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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I am looking for someone who would be able to mill, take about 1/4 the material off each side of the runners on these commercial skid shoes, so I can install them on my ST824. At the moment they are too thick to install. It would also be good if the mounting hole slots could be extended a bit further as well. Can someone on this forum with the proper machinery take care of this for me. I can ship them out, or if you happen to live nearby in New Jersey and I can bring them by, even better. I already put a set of these on my 10,000 series and love them and would like to do the same for my ST824. If not anyone know of a good machine shop in Central Jersey I can take them too? I tried taking the material down with my angle grinder, grinded for a good 10 minutes and barely any material came off. Thanks.
 

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I am not familiar with your machine, but if your problem is the scraper bar is too high with the thick skid shoes installed, then the scraper bar can usually be lowered using the slotted holes in bucket. If the scraper bar is worn out a new one may be a better option than thinner skid shoes.
 
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I have not used steel skids in many years, I use only the poly roller skids on most of all mine, or the poly elongated slides on a couple of the MTD manufactured longer bottom flimsy bucket..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
probably be cheaper to purchase the right skids for that machine.
I'm not concerned with the cost. I do commercial snow removal and I need skid shoes that last longer than those stock thin ones. I get about one sides use per storm before their worn out already, two sno storms and I already have to order another pair, I have a set of these on my 10,000 series and I barely wore them down at all the whole length of the storm I used them in, it will save me money, a lot of money in the long run. I ordered the commercial shoes, because I do commercial snow removal. Just need a little of the material removed so I can bolt them up thats all.
 
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I'm not concerned with the cost. I do commercial snow removal and I need skid shoes that last longer than those stock thin ones. I get about one sides use per storm before their worn out already, two sno storms and I already have to order another pair, I have a set of these on my 10,000 series and I barely wore them down at all the whole length of the storm I used them in, it will save me money, a lot of money in the long run. I ordered the commercial shoes, because I do commercial snow removal. Just need a little of the material removed so I can bolt them up thats all.
If thats the case I would fabricate my own or weld metal onto existing ones. there are You tube videos on this.

I don't do this but have seen a handful of machines where the owners have.

other than that , sorry can be no help to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am not familiar with your machine, but if your problem is the scraper bar is too high with the thick skid shoes installed, then the scraper bar can usually be lowered using the slotted holes in bucket. If the scraper bar is worn out a new one may be a better option than thinner skid shoes.
Again these are the commercial grade skid shoes, they fit the newer units no problem, because nothing on the bucket is impeding them. My scraper is adjusted property, at the moment these will not bolt up because they are just a bit to thick and are getting in the way of the area where the side of the bucket bumps out. I do commercial snow removal, those stock thin ones are totally worn out after two storms, I have two buy a new set of shoes evert two snowstorms, its ridiculous. I have a set of these on my 10,000 series and they work awesome, they last way longer than those stock residential shoes, like 10x longer. I just need about 1/4 of the material cut down on each side so they can bolt up. I'm going to take them into a machine shop and have them remove a quarter of the material on each side, than they will fit and still be 3x thicker than the stock ones. Not only are these thicker, but their cast Iron the stock ones are steel, they wear out fast, these barely wear at all in 1 storms commercial use. I was just trying to find out if anyone knew a way I could remove some of the material, I tried an angle grindee for 10 minutes straight, it bately made a dent, thats how strong these are, or which good local machine shop folks local to me reccomend I can take them too, that can take care of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If thats the case I would fabricate my own or weld metal onto existing ones. there are You tube videos on this.

I don't do this but have seen a handful of machines where the owners have.

other than that , sorry can be no help to you.
I don't weld and do not have a welder, plus I already forked out the $50 bucks for these ahwile ago, so I gotta use them. I'll have them milled down at a local machine shop.
I was trying more to see who local knew of a good place I could take them, to help save time finding a place or how I might be able to shorten them myself. Thanks anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Or just elongate the bolt slots a tad...?
That would be fine in order to get them to line up and bolt up, but where the bucket bumps out, the shoe can only go up so high along side, before that stops it because of that, the shoe is keeping the bucket far too high off the ground as a result so about 1/4 the material has to be cut off. I'm going to tale them into a machine shop and have them take care of it. I was hoping another NJ native like JLawrence would have chimed in on where a good machine shop that can handle this for me is located. Ite all good, I'll find one. In the meantime down the road if anyone native to central Jersey know of a good machine shop, please let me know. Thanks.
 

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What if you placed a couple large washers of the thickness you need between the shoes and the bucket to prevent the shoes contacting the bump out on the side of the bucket?
 

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I'm not concerned with the cost. I do commercial snow removal and I need skid shoes that last longer than those stock thin ones. I get about one sides use per storm before their worn out already, two sno storms and I already have to order another pair, I have a set of these on my 10,000 series and I barely wore them down at all the whole length of the storm I used them in, it will save me money, a lot of money in the long run. I ordered the commercial shoes, because I do commercial snow removal. Just need a little of the material removed so I can bolt them up thats all.
purchase or make roller skids out of UHMW poly and you'll be good to go for the entire season or more.
much easier to maneuver the machine as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What if you placed a couple large washers of the thickness you need between the shoes and the bucket to prevent the shoes contacting the bump out on the side of the bucket?
The material still has to be chopped down, because the scraper is almost a half inch off the ground with the skids set to their lowest point. I have to go to a machine shop this week to have my new bearings pressed on to my trucks differential carrier. I'm going to gave them take care of it while I'm their. Pretty sure they can, its a machine shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
purchase or make roller skids out of UHMW poly and you'll be good to go for the entire season or more.
much easier to maneuver the machine as well.
Oh yea one thing I forgot to mention. We do not want poly/roller skids on our machines. Doing commercial snow removal, sometimes we get driveways that are not paved or are stone. We need good ole fashioned skids I can just adjust down in that scenario, plus I'm not a believer in those, they started making poly skids to deal with the newer ariens that cant hold a straight line because of that autoturn and rollers, that may be okay if you have a perfectly flat paved driveway, but those are not ideal for what we put our machines thru, which is all different terrain, sidewalks that are all unlevel, up and down, paving stone, grass, rock driveways, those rollers cant deal with that. Its gotta be good ole fashioned metal skids, thats what these machines were made to have thats what their getting, all I wanna do is put a pair on that are thicker and will last us longer, we obviously go thru parts much faster than someone just using their machine residential, belts, shear bolts, skid shoes, scrapers, oil, but thats just the nature of the beast when you use a machine commercially, I just wanna try to get some parts like skid shoes to last as long as possible. I'm taking them into a machine shop later this week when I bring my bearings in to have them pressed on my differential carrier. I'll have them remove material off the runners and I'll be good to go. Thanks for the tip, but sorry poly/rollers just aren't for me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm taking them into a machine shop later this week, I'll let ya know how it goes. If they take care of it and do a good job, I'll leave their information for others in central jersey if they ever need a machine shop for something they need done, where machining is required, like pressing things on and off, etc.
 
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is there any adjustment in the scraper blade to get rid of that 1/2" gap or would a new scraper blade fix the issue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
is there any adjustment in the scraper blade to get rid of that 1/2" gap or would a new scraper blade fix the issue?
Nope, no further adjustment. Scraper still has almost all of its meat. Its because of how thick the skids were. See comment below.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I managed to cut them down to size, simply by marking them and than cutting across with an angle grinder. Their still 2 to 3x thicker than the stock ones except now they'll fit that ST824. I just gotta touch them up with paint. The machine shop could have done it for me for $10 bucks, but I figured I would try it with a $4 grinding wheel and it got the job done. Next time I'll probably have them do it. But it would have been another 25 minute drive each way, so I figured what the heck.
I don't know why I didn't think about doing it that way until today, instead of grinding them from the bottom up to where I needed them like I tried the first, time. Just cut across and now they'll work perfectly. Suprised no one suggested it to me before I finally figured it out. Kinda a shame you cant get the whole 1/2 thickness of each runners use off them, but they won't fit when their that fat. Gotta make do with half that thickness for them to work. Will still last far longer than the stock ones. They are some really thick shoes.
 

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as long as your happy with the outcome. personally i would have never done that. i would have drilled new holes in the bucket or had the machine shop extend the slots. the way you did it seems like a bit of a waste of good skids.
 
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