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I was asked by a customer if I could stop and look at his blower and give my thoughts, mind you he gave me no indication as to what the problem was even when I asked, he replied you just need to look at it.
When I got there and he opened the garage door what I saw was his big simplicity pro machine looking like it was playing the game chubby bunny like kids do with marshmallows, except not marshmallows but Great stuff expanding foam,big gap and crack filler of course, to the tune of 9 cans. I immediately went for my camera to which he said absolutely NOT!!! NO PICS!! I guess it kinda of dimmed his sense of humor..

With him being a carpenter/ contractor , his wife needed the truck and took the bag with the foam out of the truck and set it on the ground near the garage, later that night 3 weeks ago we received 5-6 inches of snow. His 14 yr old son had a snow day from school and was instructed to go ahead and blow out the drive as dad had to go to work.
The blower ate the bag and all the cans some by the augers and some by impellers by the way it looks, this stuff was clear up the chute, and totally engulfed the augers and bucket. The son stated the blower did not stop and he shut it down because of the racket/ noise, he then wheeled it into the garage, ( of course heated) then left it until later that night to tell and show his dad of the problem.

The dad said it was glued to floor and looked like an alien being lurking in the shadows !! Collateral damage was garage siding and door and window, sons boots,and snow gear all being the worst. Luckily it was only cans bursting not exploding (flames).
He is turning it into his Ins. co.
When he told his wife what had happened because she left the bag on the ground her reply was... well is that foam really expensive!!!

I will see how this turns out. Oh and no names were used to protect the innocent!! Still want a PIC though.
 

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Cut out as much as you can. Use plastic putty knife( so not to scratch the paint) and start scraping. You can also try plastic razor blades. Try acetone to loosen it. May take several attempts. Steam will remove it.

 

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NINE cans??!!! :surprise:


:eek:mg: I'm glad I wasn't there, because I think it would've taken a heart of stone, not to laugh.....:devil:
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Discussion Starter #5
Yea I went over some cleanup options with him but he is just sick as this was purchased brand new the last week of Oct.2018. It was only the 4th time being used and was $2965.00 with all his options. 32" simplicity pro
I pushed a stick into the foam and it still has foam not activated and starts oozing out.
there is also very sharp metal shards embedded and sticking out of the foam.
With the cover off foam is present in the trans area and belt area not sure how or from what opening.
I did tell him though that I would be interested in the unit if it became a salvage item. and as well interested in doing the repair if that is what it comes to.
 

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I don't know, are you sure that won't just buff out?

:)

Pretty amazing story, and probably worse than most of us can even imagine. Maybe a little extreme but I suppose it is just possible that the machine is actually 'totaled' due to the parts and labor required to restore it to being a snowblower. Maybe a day or so snow-blowing...... well, I guess golf balls, would clean it out?

I was asked by a customer if I could stop and look at his blower and give my thoughts, mind you he gave me no indication as to what the problem was even when I asked, he replied you just need to look at it.

<snip>

I will see how this turns out. Oh and no names were used to protect the innocent!! Still want a PIC though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
On a not so funny note.

My wife just told me that the son (via his mom) as of 2:00 today has been referred to a advanced optical clinic down state for what they said was several fine spatters of the foam to both eyes that came in contact with a dry eye surface and attached. And that they fear in the cornea area could be permanent eye damage.
They thought that his eyes were puffy and redish because at the same time of the blower incident he started helping a neighbor feed and take care of cattle and horses for the winter so thought that allergies from the hay etc was at play.
Not the case.
 

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Wow, that's horrible. I would be crying like a baby if that happened to my new machine.

I would imagine that his insurance will total out the machine as that foam probably got into EVERYTHING. I remember using that stuff to fill a crack in the wall and was amazed at how much a 1/2 second depression of the trigger expanded. I can't imagine what 9 full cans would do.
 

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On a not so funny note.

My wife just told me that the son (via his mom) as of 2:00 today has been referred to a advanced optical clinic down state for what they said was several fine spatters of the foam to both eyes that came in contact with a dry eye surface and attached. And that they fear in the cornea area could be permanent eye damage.
They thought that his eyes were puffy and redish because at the same time of the blower incident he started helping a neighbor feed and take care of cattle and horses for the winter so thought that allergies from the hay etc was at play.
Not the case.

That's a shame, especially for someone so young. Hopefully he'll be alright.


This puts a whole new spin on how "expensive" those 9 cans of foam were...….
 

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On a not so funny note.

My wife just told me that the son (via his mom) as of 2:00 today has been referred to a advanced optical clinic down state for what they said was several fine spatters of the foam to both eyes that came in contact with a dry eye surface and attached. And that they fear in the cornea area could be permanent eye damage.
They thought that his eyes were puffy and redish because at the same time of the blower incident he started helping a neighbor feed and take care of cattle and horses for the winter so thought that allergies from the hay etc was at play.
Not the case.

Oh no.....that poor kid! :surprise: Especially since this was not his fault........
Anyone who's used that stuff knows that if you get it on your skin and it dries, it's pretty tough to remove without removing some skin with it.

Sounds like the lad unfortunately has some eye surgery in his future....:icon_blue_very_sad:
The heck with the snowblower....but hopefully their homeowners insurance will cover that.

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I'm sure it can be removed but from my experience with it the paint would have to come too. It doesn't just buff out and I haven't tried it but I'm guessing it would clog sandpaper pretty quickly. Not sure if you could take a wire wheel on a drill to it and then a dremel for the small stuff.

You really needed to sneak a couple pictures for "insurance" purposes. :devil:


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how about trying to use a 3.000 psi power washer 0 deg tip and cut it out, if we can cut steel with high pressure jets why not foam?

hope the kids eyes are ok yet ask how did he not hear it? must have made one heck of a racket .
 

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I'm sure it can be removed but from my experience with it the paint would have to come too. It doesn't just buff out and I haven't tried it but I'm guessing it would clog sandpaper pretty quickly. Not sure if you could take a wire wheel on a drill to it and then a dremel for the small stuff.
They have sandpaper that is a mesh, holes in it. It comes in different grits as sandpaper does. It's used for plaster which immediately clogs sandpaper, also used for drywall joint compound.

Body shops use a flat grater stick, 1 1/2" x 12", to quickly remove body filler. This would work. Of course start with a saw in a saw holder. This allows the pointy part of the saw to get in to tight places, a sheetrock hole saw would be the best.
 

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Once you get the bulk of the it out, Scotchbrite might be useful to remove stuck-on foam without damaging the paint.
 

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WOW is all I can say. Workplace safety is something that must be taken seriously. I have a few stories of things my wife did similar to this, but never with many thousands of damage, just one K at a time. Foam is a hazardous chemical. All *responsible* members of the family must be educated to keep these away from children, pets, and wives. It's funny how it always takes a few very small mistakes, which compound into a safety disaster with possible injury to people.

I'm a contractor. I would let the foam SET first fully. If you poke it while wet, it will turn into a thick gel enamel substance which takes FOREVER to dry and fills metal voids like epoxy. It's best to rip it out in large dry sections, and then scrape the rest. Use "brush cleaner", it's a milder acetone mix with some other chemicals that seems to take it off easily for minor mistakes or overspray.
 

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I wear eye glasses when foaming in tight spaces, upside down, joist bays, crawlspaces, etc. Other guys laugh and say that's overkill. I will steer all of them to this thread from now on.
 

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I wonder if pump gas would eat through that foam. You need a can and try to experiment with different solvents till you get something that breaks it down.

Terrible news about the son. Hope for the best outcome possible for him.
 

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On a not so funny note.

My wife just told me that the son (via his mom) as of 2:00 today has been referred to a advanced optical clinic down state for what they said was several fine spatters of the foam to both eyes that came in contact with a dry eye surface and attached. And that they fear in the cornea area could be permanent eye damage.
They thought that his eyes were puffy and redish because at the same time of the blower incident he started helping a neighbor feed and take care of cattle and horses for the winter so thought that allergies from the hay etc was at play.
Not the case.
This is a good reason to wear eye protection when snowblowing. I just started to wear goggles this year. I was drilling into some wood this fall and it hit my eye hard enough to splatter liquid onto my cheek. Fortunately I just had a sore eye for about a month, but I hope I've learned my lesson. Zoro.com has decent Uvex goggles and they are not very expensive.
 
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