Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, New here. First snowblower I ever owned... Just bought a used Ariens 8526. Literally bought it and took it in to get serviced as it hasn't been touched for a year and a half. any advice to make this thing last a lifetime, help with performance or accessories I should get, please let me know
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,715 Posts
Just keep it well maintained,... grease oil levels, etc.

Periodically check nuts and bolts, for anything loose or broken.

The place that is servicing it will give you pointers in person when you pick it up. I take it you are not that mechanically inclined then, as most hear service there own equipment, which is fine … either way, it is crucial to keep it serviced, and running smoothly.

Wear appropriate clothing.
Never , ever stick your hand or feet near a running machines moving parts.

It will take a few runnnings to get the proper travel, where you blow the snow etc … After the snow comes at you once from the wind blowing it back at you, you will know all about the chute crank …. :)

Enjoy your new machine, your going to enjoy it. Stay safe, and welcome to the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Hello Snowjob!

Congratulations on your first snowblower! Like Oneacer said, be safe first, keep hands and face away from the chute!

Also, if you want to learn to maintain your blower, follow threads here and learn. There are very knowledgeble people here to help you!

Have fun and let it snow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Just keep it well maintained,... grease oil levels, etc.

Periodically check nuts and bolts, for anything loose or broken.

The place that is servicing it will give you pointers in person when you pick it up. I take it you are not that mechanically inclined then, as most hear service there own equipment, which is fine … either way, it is crucial to keep it serviced, and running smoothly.

Wear appropriate clothing.
Never , ever stick your hand or feet near a running machines moving parts.

It will take a few runnnings to get the proper travel, where you blow the snow etc … After the snow comes at you once from the wind blowing it back at you, you will know all about the chute crank …. :)

Enjoy your new machine, your going to enjoy it. Stay safe, and welcome to the forum.
Hey thanks guys. Im actually pretty mechanically inclined... built my own autocross car, modify all my vehicles, etc. This being my first snowblower or anything with such a small engine I wanted a pro to go completely over it properly, after which I will be taking over all maintenance. is there anyway to make these little engines pump out more or are they already tapped out for max performance? this machine is already way overkill for the tiny area that I have but I got it at what I believe was a great deal so I got it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,203 Posts
Hey guys, New here. First snowblower I ever owned... Just bought a used Ariens 8526. Literally bought it and took it in to get serviced as it hasn't been touched for a year and a half. any advice to make this thing last a lifetime, help with performance or accessories I should get, please let me know

Read your owners manual cover to cover. If you don't have one you can download one from Ariens. I just bought an 824 and the seller made a CD operator's manual for me. It shows the maintenance schedule and setup guidlines. Your manual will tell you everything you need to know but most important is the safety section which is usually the section that is most often ignored, apparently.

Enjoy your new machine!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Just keep it well maintained,... grease oil levels, etc.
What he said. It is also where most snow blower owners screw up and keep small engine mechanics employed over the winter. Read, no, study, the owner's manual and keep it oiled and greased, do whatever is appropriate for your area regarding the fuel system in the off season, either preservative or drain all fuel - and since you built an autocross car you know your way around an engine.

Regarding "hopping up" the engine, I would tread carefully there as doing that can affect reliability, which I would regard as the most important characteristic in a snow blower engine. No matter how powerful it is once it is started, if it is a pain to get going I don't want it. I want reliability and not have to fool around with wrenching when there's a foot of snow on the ground and more coming. Done that, it wasn't fun, but your tastes may differ.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I recently found a great deal on a nice used Ariens blower myself. Mine had been through the shop last season, previous owner had a $300 receipt from the dealer. Other than a general clean up it has not needed a thing. I have put a couple hours on it this year and I think it is going to be a great addition to my small snow arsenal. Research out your model a little, especially on the Ariens site by one of the members here, lots of good info. As far as hopping it up... I did find that sometimes the same displacement engine comes in several ratings. Like the 358 Techumseh on my blower. The same engine comes as a 9, 10 or 11 hp version. Some claim the difference is from running the high end of the rpm range ie the 9 hp runs 3400, 10 runs 3600, 11 runs 3800... Hard to verify and I do not have a tool to even check the rpm setting on my machine. A little investigating might show carb differences too, depends on your model but there could be some room to bump the power a little. The other thing I like about bumping the rpm just a little is the potential for better throw distance. The new super high output machines run a higher impeller speed to improve performance. I have heard that these engines are good for 6000 rpm in something like a go cart so a bump from 3400-3600 is unlikely to adversely affect the reliability much. Or you could go whole hog and do a repower, not as difficult or expensive as it sounds. Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
I don’t like doing eod snow last it leaves more salt on machine. I leave a section of my drive with snow to blow after I do the salty snowplow eod. This kinda removes the salty snow. I also park machine with bucket scraper on a piece of pvc pipe to get it away from wet concrete. My 2 cents.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hey thanks guys. Im actually pretty mechanically inclined... built my own autocross car, modify all my vehicles, etc. This being my first snowblower or anything with such a small engine I wanted a pro to go completely over it properly, after which I will be taking over all maintenance. is there anyway to make these little engines pump out more or are they already tapped out for max performance? this machine is already way overkill for the tiny area that I have but I got it at what I believe was a great deal so I got it.
A cold air intake?

Sorry couldn't resist. :grin:
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top