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Troy Bilt 2420
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone: New member and first time snow blower owner here. I live in the mountains of Arizona at about 6000 feet elevation. While we don’t get snow often in winter, when it does snow it can really add up - often over a foot. As a septuagenarian, shoveling a 200 foot driveway that goes uphill to the street, is not something I should do anymore. Duh! So, I’ve joined the club here, and ordered a Troy Bilt 2420 that has not been delivered yet. Waiting out the supply/delivery chain issue like everyone.

I am trying to get my arms around some concerns about tires (comes with 13” x 4” X-Trac tires - I believe optimal pressure is about 20 PSI), specifically how to handle the temperature extremes and storage in the off season. While not bitterly cold here, it is usually below freezing here at night most of the winter months, but in the summer the temperature often is close to 100 degrees in the daytime. Sure, during operation in winter the tires will be inflated per recommended specs. But other than snow season, the snowblower will be kept in the garage out of our harsh sunlight and other weather extremes. So, I’m thinking that I may have to adjust the tire pressure depending on the seasons and temperature norms when not in use. Should I reduce the pressure a bit in the summer (the garage gets hot in daytime) and perhaps block the snow blower off the floor to avoid flat spots while in summer storage? Would love to have airless tires to avoid this hassle, but not offered in this wheel size that I know of. I guess I should admit that I am a little fearful of flat tires when I really need the snowblower.

One last thing, I’d rather not “over-buy”an air pump for these tires as I have no other uses for one. Since the tires would be inflated to about 20-22 pounds or so, can I get by with a bicycle pump (with a Schrader valve attachment)? Thanks in advance for your feedback. Looking forward to learning from you all. >> Jim
 

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The 20 pounds is max ........ I usually keep mine 17-18 lbs.

I have a compressor in my shop as well as my attached garage up at the house.

A hand pump would work ... Mine are stored just parked normally .... I do periodically start all my equipment throughout the year.

I use 5W30 Full Synthetic oil in all my equipment of all seasons and all my 5 gallon gas cans get 2oz of Stabil and 2oz of SeaFoam.
 

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Tires will be fine..I have the same tires..no flat spots.
The problem with alot of blowers with off season storage and fuel that contains alcohol....forget the sticker that says 10 percent alcohol is ok...its not for storage.
Finde some alcohol free fuel for the machine...invest in a good jug that is air tight.
Be sure the oil is full before starting it.
Buy some wax...and wax the inside of everything...bucket..gear box..augers and chute...snow can stick to the machine if it's around the freezing mark....especially if the machine is above freezing when you go to blow snow...like being kept in a garage.
Start it up once in a while off season...every few weeks or so.
When you know snow is coming...go out side and pick up anything on the ground where you will be blowing snow ...objects are pretty rough on the machines.
Blow the snow as soon as you can...fresh snow is a breeze...after it been driven on not so much.

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I've got a Honda HS828. Every spring I siphon the gas out of the tank, then start it up and burn the gas out of the carb. When the engine quits, the snowblower is put away for the season. I've never done anything to the tires, but I never fill them to the max pressure anyway.

Wax? Can you buy spray wax? A lot of guys here recommend using Fluid Film (available at Hopot) to spray down the inside of the auger housing/auger, chute areas before each use. Someone even suggested, WD40 or penetrating oil before using the snowblower. I'd suggest you be careful where you spray anything. Petroleum distillates can cut grease and you don't want to spray bearings (sealed or otherwise) or rubber boots/parts.

Bicycle pump? I doubt that will do it for you. If you have a friend who rides, borrow his pump. I have two of those larger types that have a foot bar to stand on, which holds the pump upright. A T handle is worked up and down to pump the tires up. It takes about 20 strokes to kick the pressure in my motor cycle up about 4-5 lbs. These pumps do not pump a lot of air, I think you will find the amount of pumping will be too much like work. I use a California Air compressor (amazingly quiet) to fill all my tires. The hand pumps are only used to add a pound or two. It's amazing how many uses I find for my compressor. I check car tires every couple of months, blow dirt out of the garage, run air tools, etc.

Don't forget to change the oil at the end of the season. Do not even think of draining the oil and planning to fill the crankcase next winter. Drain and fill in one session. (There is a horror story of a thread on this website of someone who might have forgotten to add oil before starting).

Good luck with your new toy.
 

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03 Simlicity 860E, 78 Ariens 922022
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I've got a Honda HS828. Every spring I siphon the gas out of the tank, then start it up and burn the gas out of the carb. When the engine quits, the snowblower is put away for the season. I've never done anything to the tires, but I never fill them to the max pressure anyway.

Wax? Can you buy spray wax? A lot of guys here recommend using Fluid Film (available at Hopot) to spray down the inside of the auger housing/auger, chute areas before each use. Someone even suggested, WD40 or penetrating oil before using the snowblower. I'd suggest you be careful where you spray anything. Petroleum distillates can cut grease and you don't want to spray bearings (sealed or otherwise) or rubber boots/parts.

Bicycle pump? I doubt that will do it for you. If you have a friend who rides, borrow his pump. I have two of those larger types that have a foot bar to stand on, which holds the pump upright. A T handle is worked up and down to pump the tires up. It takes about 20 strokes to kick the pressure in my motor cycle up about 4-5 lbs. These pumps do not pump a lot of air, I think you will find the amount of pumping will be too much like work. I use a California Air compressor (amazingly quiet) to fill all my tires. The hand pumps are only used to add a pound or two. It's amazing how many uses I find for my compressor. I check car tires every couple of months, blow dirt out of the garage, run air tools, etc.

Don't forget to change the oil at the end of the season. Do not even think of draining the oil and planning to fill the crankcase next winter. Drain and fill in one session. (There is a horror story of a thread on this website of someone who might have forgotten to add oil before starting).

Good luck with your new toy.
I love having a compressor. I'm just Joe Family guy and I counted 24 tires I have to attend too! Air tools are nice too but I use the blow gun most after the chuck.
 

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Don't over think it. The tires will be just fine and there's no need to babysit them over the summer. Come fall top them up with the bike pump and you'll be good to go.
 

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The rule of thumb I have always gone by was for every 10 degrees of temperature change, you can expect a change of 1 lb of pressure. If you inflate them to about 16lbs when it is 30 degrees outside, the pressure could get to about 23 or 24 when it hits 100 degrees. I really would not worry about those couple pounds over, seeing as how the machine would be simply sitting in the shed. Putting it up on wood or concrete blocks is probably not a bad idea, simply to keep moisture away from the metal surfaces. (More of a problem in the northeast than in Arizona.)

You would probably be able to do it with a bike pump, but in all fairness, you can get a pretty decent 3 gal air compressor and hose / attachment kit from Harbor Freight for about $50. You could also get one of those small travel air compressors that runs off of 12 volts, like from your car. Even a small one should only run about $10, probably as cheap as a bike pump, with less effort.

Good maintenance should give you years of good service with your blower.
 

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Welcome to SBF, I would never have guessed there was a need for snow blowers in Arizona :cool:

Good advice given.
I would not worry about flat spots during storage. X tracs are great tires, you do not want the airless style.
I would buy a 12V cheap compressor if you have no need for a better 120V unit.
I would inflate your tires to 15lbs once the weather gets colder and not be concerned with summer heat causing problems. Recheck the pressure the next fall
 

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Agreed with the guys... tires are the least worry. However... I suppose you could always set the machine up on blocks so that the wheels are off the ground.

As far as tire pressure you should experiment and see where you get the best grip... also agreed it's usually less than the max PSI recommended.
 

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Troy Bilt 2420
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone for your welcoming, thoughtful and detailed responses. Good info by you "grizzlied" snow veterans.:giggle: I shall try to not be so paranoid about the tires. And try to NOT go too cheap on an air pump. There is a local Harbor Freight store nearby.

My machine arrives next week sometime. I am going to go with full synthetic 10W30 which is what the Troy Bilt 2420 engine manual suggests (they specify either 5W30 regular or 10W30 synthetic.)

Got the message loud and clear about the ills of leaving E10 fuel (treated or otherwise) in the tank for too long or off season. As the blower will get infrequent use here where I live, my thinking is to use TruFuel or similar (Stihl sells it too) as it seems like it would not break down between uses. Yes, I understand that it is crazy expensive. But regular gas would go mostly unused. A follow up question - to those of you who use TruFuel. How do you handle the off season storage RE fuel? Do you still siphon out or run your tank empty?

As an aside, one response I read above was someone's surprise about snow in Arizona. Well, once one travels north out of Phoenix 100 miles or so, you're into the so-called "high country", e.g., 5500 to 8000 feet elevation. Snow is common in the winter. In fact it's welcomed as a source of fresh water replenishment. And there is skiing in Flagstaff and other locations up here in the mountains. Just 4 or 5 inches of snow (common) means I'm stuck getting out of my uphill driveway. And the Mrs. says she 'ain't' shoveling no more and to get a snowblower. 😡
Cloud Sky Snow Mountain Natural landscape
 

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Thanks everyone for your welcoming, thoughtful and detailed responses. Good info by you "grizzlied" snow veterans.:giggle: I shall try to not be so paranoid about the tires. And try to NOT go too cheap on an air pump. There is a local Harbor Freight store nearby.

My machine arrives next week sometime. I am going to go with full synthetic 10W30 which is what the Troy Bilt 2420 engine manual suggests (they specify either 5W30 regular or 10W30 synthetic.)

Got the message loud and clear about the ills of leaving E10 fuel (treated or otherwise) in the tank for too long or off season. As the blower will get infrequent use here where I live, my thinking is to use TruFuel or similar (Stihl sells it too) as it seems like it would not break down between uses. Yes, I understand that it is crazy expensive. But regular gas would go mostly unused. A follow up question - to those of you who use TruFuel. How do you handle the off season storage RE fuel? Do you still siphon out or run your tank empty?

As an aside, one response I read above was someone's surprise about snow in Arizona. Well, once one travels north out of Phoenix 100 miles or so, you're into the so-called "high country", e.g., 5500 to 8000 feet elevation. Snow is common in the winter. In fact it's welcomed as a source of fresh water replenishment. And there is skiing in Flagstaff and other locations up here in the mountains. Just 4 or 5 inches of snow (common) means I'm stuck getting out of my uphill driveway. And the Mrs. says she 'ain't' shoveling no more and to get a snowblower. View attachment 181439
Go with the 5/30 oil as you know it going to be cold with the machine in operation.
These engines are splash fed...there is no oil pump

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