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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
So I bought a Stens scraper bar coming via Amazon. I just spent longer than I thought getting those skid shoes and old scraper bar off so I can do some sanding, priming, painting and then install poly shoes from Detroit Thermo. The smaller 5 nuts along the scraper bar came off with an impact. The freakin larger 4 nuts on the skid shoes were tougher, and only after 4 yrs! I had wire wheeled the threads clean last night and gave a good douse of PBlaster. Thought that would do it but they were still feeling like they were going to round out the square frame holes. Got a vicegrip on 3 of the carriage heads and finally worked those nuts off with an impact. On the 4th, still wouldn't budge and wasn't getting a good hold with vicegrips so finally gave up and ground it down/cut it off from the inside with an angle grinder. Sheesh sparks flying etc just to get the damn skid shoe off a 4 yr old blower. I will MOST DEFINITELY apply a good amount of antiseize on the threads of the new hardware when I install the poly shoes. On one of the 4 square frame holes it started to round out but hopefully I can get it tight while still using a stainless carriage bolt.
 

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If you go with another carriage bolt, just put a serrated washer over the carriage bolt before putting it in ... that will grab the carriage bolt from spinning while tightening. Or just put in a regular bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If you go with another carriage bolt, just put a serrated washer over the carriage bolt before putting it in ... that will grab the carriage bolt from spinning while tightening. Or just put in a regular bolt.
That's good advice. The Detroit Thermo poly skids come with 4 carriage bolts, stainless, so I would like to use those for aesthetics (aesthetics on a snowblower, I know) rather than a hex head bolt if it works. 3 of the holes are still mostly square, and one is like a square with rounded corners so that is the one that might not work with only the carriage bolt.
 

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Or if you have a welder, just give it a tack ... :)

They use carriage bolts there probably in case the bucket gets skewed, the auger end would slide over the carriage bolt, instead of possibly catching a normal hex bolt. ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
You guys were right - those axles are both stuck on the wheels. I was out messing around today and used my new grease gun to grease the auger zerks on my 17 yr old 7524 first time (oops - I should have joined this forum in 2004...) and also took off the wheels and put a smooth layer of Permatex Purple Ceramic Brake Lube all over the axles. I know some people like Antiseize but that stuff is so messy and I've read about it drying up and flaking so I went with the greasier coating. Opened the belly pan for the first time and wow my main axle drive gear on the 7524 is PLASTIC! I was surprised by that one. I didn't see any grease there and the manual didn't indicate it, and figured grease would eat away at the plastic so just left it.

Any tips on freeing up the wheels from the axles on my new Deluxe? The right one is okay since the small shaft pulls out so I figure I can put a socket in the other side and tap it out. But the left side basically wants to pull the whole axle out toward the left so I need to free that one while leaving the axle in place. Would you leak a little PBlaster in the axle/wheel area and then wiggle the wheel around some?

The wheels on the 2017 Deluxe 24 have more rust on them than my 2004 7524. This guy must have either had his outside at some point, or that tarping it in the garage sealed in the moisture and made a nice little steam room for the rust, or got it all slopped with salty snow whereas I didn't as much. Dude also enjoyed pumping his zerks but I don't think he ever opened the belly pan because he had a LOT of grease pumped in there around the transmission differential. I wiped some of the excess away.

I bought a can of Rustoleum Allis Chalmers Orange and one of Rustoleum Chevy Engine Block Enamel, and did a test spray on the old scraper bar I had pulled off. I would say both colors would be fine but maybe the Chevy is slightly closer - a little brighter orange than the Allis Chalmers which looks a little more pumpkin-y.

Snowblower nerd in May haha
 

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I work on blowers all year ... I may sell some in the fall if I need room, I fix some, and have been known to do some complete restorations. I am surely addicted, but I enjoy it as a hobby.

Yes, truly addicted ... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
So I got the axles free, cleaned them up well, and got a nice thin coating of Permatex ceramic brake lube all over. That should prevent them from seizing on again. I also soaked the clips overnight in vinegar and salt and got all the rust off. Rubbed a nice coating of Sil-Glyde on them and that should help them stay nice and rust free. I am going to wire wheel that outside part of the wheel too but ran out of time. I may spraypaint the wheels too as they are rusted around the edges a bit.

Do I need to oil the idler pulley (not the outside obviously, but where it is mounted and rotates) as shown in the picture - the one that presses in to engage the auger belts? It turns, but it isn't a frictionless turn. The manual doesn't say anything about oiling that piece and I can't tell if it is mounted on a plastic or rubber bushing or something that shouldn't get oil. Any thoughts? (see bottom picture)

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Those idler pulleys usually have a sealed bearing. Like Yanmar stated, I am sure its from sitting, and I also would let it "wear" in.

I would probably squirt a little penatrating oil on a rag, and wipe the outside of the idler pulleys, just to arrest the rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Those idler pulleys usually have a sealed bearing. Like Yanmar stated, I am sure its from sitting, and I also would let it "wear" in.

I would probably squirt a little penatrating oil on a rag, and wipe the outside of the idler pulleys, just to arrest the rust.
Yeah thanks guys - I figured out the sealed bearing thing after I posted the original question. I took off the pulley and cleaned off a lot of the rust inside and outside of that pulley wheel with some vinegar and salt. It spins just fine...I'm sure that is how it is supposed to spin with a sealed bearing like that...not 100% frictionless but it spins without any issue so I will just go with it. Somehow the way the prior owner stored it really caused rust! I was also able to take a wire wheel to that auger box cover plug and it shined up really nice without any paint needed. I got the rusty edges of the bucket cleaned with the wire wheel and put metal primer on there, brush on for good thickness. Last step is to spray the orange engine enamel, and then once that is all dry, get the wheels off and get rid of the rusty edges and then paint those. Then it will truly be "my new" snowblower as if I got it from the factory haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Guys just FYI - some of you prob know this - but the Rustoleum Engine Enamel Chevy Orange IS THE PERFECT MATCH as far as I can see. I also tested the "Allis Chalmers Orange" on the old scraper bar I removed and it is a little more pumpkin-orange than the brighter, slightly redder orange on my Ariens. A lot of people posted on here that the Allis Chalmers is a great match, so I wanted to offer my different opinion. The Chevy Orange is so perfect that while I masked everything off to begin with, when I removed the tape and blended out a few areas I was able to just spray spray spray and it blends completely. For example on this picture, the front few inches and bottom 5 inches are new paint while the rest is original factory. I literally cannot see a difference, which makes it excellent for touch ups/blending. Hopefully if someone else is needing to paint they will benefit from this picture and info.
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
And one more recommendation - I was looking to repaint the wheels - in the pictures above you can see the rust on the edges etc. I was going to go with a charcoal gray gloss enamel but then saw this Automotive Wheel Paint in the store, a nice metallic graphite color, and decided to try it. Really like it! Sprays and flows really evenly, has a nice look, a little darker than the factory paint but looks sharp in my opinion and better matches the darker color of the metal on the wheel clips. And it says it dries in 30 mins too. Here is the first side of the wheels done. I masked them off and then also took a piece of thin cardboard and cut a hole slightly larger than the rim and just set that over the top to avoid any overspray onto the tires. Once this is all dry then I bolt on the new scraper bar, and the new Detroit Thermo poly shoes, and this baby is ready for action! And by action I mean sitting in the corner of my garage only to come out a few times a year max haha! Funny thing is, I know THIS WINTER the first time it snows more than 2 inches I will be the one dude on the street pulling out his snowblower so I can try her out o_O

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Thanks man! First time doing snowblower cleanup and yeah I am happy with how this one cleaned up. It wasn't bad to begin with but now feels like it is a new unit for me!
 

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I disagree with the advice to just let the roughness in the idler pulley "wear itself in". Roughness in a bearing NEVER gets better. You may get the bearing to spin freely for a while but all you are doing is destroying the bearing.

Think about it for a minute. Sealed bearings only have grease inside when new. What are the few things that can get in the bearing and cause roughness? Water and dirt.

Let's talk dirt first. If dirt got in there and runs through the balls and race, it creates a fine grit that is emulsified into the grease creating a paste that is similar to valve grinding compound. Everyone knows how effective valve grinding compound is at low speed on hardened surfaces, think about how much material it could remove at 3600 rpm. Once the clearances are widened, the balls can ride out of the race and jam and the unit is destroyed.

When it comes to water, it kills the lubricity of the grease and accelerates the formation of rust, because the emulsified grease/water mixture creates even more opportunity for rust to form. Once again, rust forms to the point that it interferes with the smooth rotation of the pulley and you are creating the same type of situation mentioned above.

My question to the original poster is this. If the project is intended to result in a clean well running machine, why skip bringing a major component up to spec now instead of waiting til the bearing fails while snow is on the ground?
 

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PS. Hopefully your salt and vinegar solution didn't infiltrate the seals or you just made things much worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
PS. Hopefully your salt and vinegar solution didn't infiltrate the seals or you just made things much worse.
I made sure not to get the salt and vinegar into the area where the bearing is. I just wiped and then used a wire brush, and when I let certain areas sit then I just had it in a shallow dish where only the rim of the pulley was in vinegar and the bearing area wasn't. Yeah I realized you don't want to submerge the whole thing and ruin the bearing.

It turns just fine. I guess I don't have another to compare it to but it isn't like a nearly frictionless bearing where if I spin it it will spin freely for 30 seconds on its own like a top, but my guess is that none of them do that. I will use it and then check it again periodically. From the smooth feel of it now, feels premature to buy a brand new pulley
 
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