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Discussion Starter #1
On a new model ( mine) is it designed so that if traction is good and I'm trying to go through heavy , bucket height + of snow , the friction part should slip to protect the rest of the drive train to the wheels from too much stress ?
 

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The wheels on my (nearly new) 24" Platimum just keep turning.
 

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The wheels on my (nearly new) 24" Platimum just keep turning.
That's what I thought , but being new to snowblowers I just wanted to check. My only real experiences with friction drive are from an old snapper comet 30 , the only thing that would stop it was a loss of traction trying to push over saplings after they got close to 2" diameter :rolleyes: The only wear on the drive disk was because I liked to put it into high gear , dump the clutch , and see how far I could ride a wheelie :D
 

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This is what I was trying to blow yesterday . Bucket + depth , full bucket width , snow that has been there a while and has had snow blown on top of it .

 

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Just remember one thing. You own a snow blower and not a plow. The drive train is designed to move the machine around and not plow snow. You should always match your drive speed with the depth and weight of the snow. Let the front of the machine process the snow and just use the drive to move it as the snow clears.

You and your machine will both be much happier if you go easy on it.
 

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The transmission should be able to transfer power in excess of your traction. In other words it should not slip, it is not an overload clutch and traction should break at the ground. Any axles, pins, chains etc. should be capable of handling anything the systm can develop.

Something as simple as wind blown snow wetting the drive disc surface will make these transmissions slip.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just remember one thing. You own a snow blower and not a plow. The drive train is designed to move the machine around and not plow snow. You should always match your drive speed with the depth and weight of the snow. Let the front of the machine process the snow and just use the drive to move it as the snow clears.

You and your machine will both be much happier if you go easy on it.
Thanks ! I am just learning here :eek:
The drive speed was at the lowest setting , but the snow is settled and heavy ( my dog weighs close to 80# and those are his tracks on top of the snow) . By half way into that short run the front of the machine was still processing the snow very well , but that's when slippage started. After that I tried just tapping the drive handle , or backing up a foot or two and trying again ( tapping the drive ) . The bucket never came close to needing time to process the little bites I was taking , nothing at scraper bar level except the heavy snow , but the wheels would stop turning. I gave up because I didn't want to wear out the disk .
I know I was asking a lot out of it , but wanted to get the snow off my frozen sump pump line.
Guess I just didn't buy the right machine for my needs. :rolleyes:
 

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"Any axles, pins, chains etc. should be capable of handling anything the systm can develop."

Well, up to a point. Trying to do too much is how those things do get broken.
In normal operation everything is designed to work properly but it's also the reason they put in shear bolts or soft bolts in the wheel drive system. So they break before something else does because the engine can produce enough torque to damage the axles, chains, gears, etc in the system when someone exceeds the machines abilities.
 

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"Any axles, pins, chains etc. should be capable of handling anything the systm can develop."

Well, up to a point. Trying to do too much is how those things do get broken.
In normal operation everything is designed to work properly but it's also the reason they put in shear bolts or soft bolts in the wheel drive system. So they break before something else does because the engine can produce enough torque to damage the axles, chains, gears, etc in the system when someone exceeds the machines abilities.
Ground ground engagement is the "overload clutch". The tires should spin before the drive train can hurt it's self.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK , so clearly I was asking too much by trying to go through snow that has been there for over a month. I'll just make sure that I only use it for fresh snow and not ask it to anything heavier. Glad I don't have the eod stuff to try and move.
 

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Ground ground engagement is the "overload clutch". The tires should spin before the drive train can hurt it's self.
Unless you really try to break it! :rolleyes:

My second snowblower was a first-generation Ariens with no differential: the wheels were keyed to the axles.

One spring day I was using it to remove a snowdrift - the wheels had chains on them and were on bare pavement so they got crazy grip. And the snowdrift was highly compacted so the wheel drive was really being taxed trying to push the machine into the drift.

I find out just how much it was being taxed when I heard a cracking noise and suddenly there was no drive to the wheels. Both wheel hubs had split in half!

I welded them back together and was more careful from that point forward, and got several years' more good use out of the machine.
 

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Phil, no one is saying you asked too much from the machine but you likely are taking it to it's limit.
What we are talking about is if the wheels quit turning something is wrong as either the friction disc or belt is slipping. Even going into that month old packed deep snow you should still have the wheels trying to dig in.
Something needs an adjustment.

The second thing "we" were kicking around is that traction to the ground is the weak point and they should slip before something breaks. From some of the threads you can see that isn't always true and somehow people seem to find a way to break things.

You and your machine should be able to eat into that pile of snow. I've needed to widen an area from time to time and like you took my machine into a lot of more or less really deep packed snow and it takes some time but it eats it. And that's an old, well used MTD.

Your NEW Ariens might just need an adjustment to tighten up the drive belt or the pressure on the friction wheel when it's applied.
 
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