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I've cut through the plastic cover, added elbows and a shut-off. A real PITA to do. Is the problem a leaking needle and seat or you are in fear of it leaking in the garage and filling the space with explosive fumes?
Most of my customers buy a plastic tray, similar to one used for muddy boots and shoes, and place it under the thrower to contain any oil leaks or fuel leaks. You MUST check the dipstick every time you use the thrower as any leaks past the needle and seat may end up in the crankcase which with an electric start will hydraulic your rings and break them. When a non-electric start engine is almost impossible to pull, it means 99% of the time that fuel has entered the cylinder and crankcase. Any dipstick that is past full and smells like gas has a leaking needle and seat and it must be addressed.


Anything can be done, just add time and money to the equation, and the fact that it will look Rube Goldberged too.
 

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While a fuel shut off valve is definitely a nice feature to have. I would not worry too much about adding one. If you either drain the tank/run it dry at the end of the season and always use a quality stabilizer like Star Tron or Marine Stabil (probably don't have to run it dry I sometimes don't, another method is to keep the fuel tank full to avoid moisture build-up when storing). I have a 15 year old Briggs Vanguard engine on my lawn tractor it doesn't have a fuel shut off. Knock on wood, using 87 octane gas and what I mentioned above, have not had any fuel related issues with the carb.
 

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I like having a shutoff, I run it dry after every use. I also run stable in all the gas I put in. That is until it snows weekly, then I don't bother, but could be weeks between snow here, so I do that as a precaution.

I added one to my last blower for this reason.

Are there pictures of the engine that can be posted? Who makes a 2X26?......never mind it's Cub Cadet. Looking for pics now.
 

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In 2011 when I bought my 21m214 Briggs And Straton or my repower, it didn't have a fuel shut off. So I installed one before I mounted it. It wasn't hard, but just a little time consuming because I had to a few trial runs to cut the correct amount of fuel line so that the shut off would sit correctly in place. It is well worth having.
 

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I can tell you my 2016 CC 3X 420CC doesnt have a fuel shut off valve. It would be easy to add but you would probably have to trim the engine shroud. I will just drain the gas and run it empty at the end of the season. I would wait till the warranty is up to add the shut off valve personally. The Powermore engines are Chinese, made by Zongshen.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all of the ideas and comments. Think I will wait until end of warranty period. All have a great Christmas and a heathy New Year!!!
Ron
 

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Thought on a fuel shut off.

Remove the plastic shroud that covers the fuel line, install an inline shut off exactly as vmax29 shod, reinstall the shroud, drill a hole in it, cut a slot in a 1/2" metal rod, or bolt to fit over and around the fuel shut off handle, insert through hole in shroud to turn off turn on (with no psychedelics, hey I'm a child of the 60s).
 
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CC has left off the shut off valves, AND the fuels filters. CC Tech support are all scratching their heads on this. I have a fuel tank inlet strainer coming in today. I'll let you know if it fits. My tankmay be different from yours. I will be adding a 90 degree B&S shutoff to my 3x 30 HD at the end of the line where it enters the engine. I'll post pics once it's done.

CC Tech supports says run it dry, get some Tru Fuel (no ethanol) and run the machine with a little Stabil in the Tru Fuel for 10 minutes prior to long term storage.
 

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I've cut through the plastic cover, added elbows and a shut-off. A real PITA to do.
Please share pics as I am considering one of these machines. As for the utility/validity of having one and the dubious assistance offered by CC tech support, here is my two cents.

A fuel shutoff valve is absolutely necessary for the following reasons:
1. If the carburetor float valve fails, all of the fuel from the tank will not leak in your garage or other enclosed space.
2. If you are anticipating not running it for a while, but still within season, you can run the carb dry without emptying the tank.
3. Unless the fuel tank is kept meticulously clean, gunk from the bottom will eventually get sucked into the carburetor. This may not seem to be a big deal when the engine is new, but eventually there will be stuff in the bottom. At the end of the season, I run my tank down fairly low, add stabilizer to the fuel, mix well, shut off the valve, and run the carb dry. Easy peasy.
 

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3. Unless the fuel tank is kept meticulously clean, gunk from the bottom will eventually get sucked into the carburetor. This may not seem to be a big deal when the engine is new, but eventually there will be stuff in the bottom. At the end of the season, I run my tank down fairly low, add stabilizer to the fuel, mix well, shut off the valve, and run the carb dry. Easy peasy.
This is why I like plastic tanks, less problems with sediment. What I do with metal tanks, and I will do with my new machine, is coat the inside of the tank. This keeps it from rusting, and corroding, keeping the sediment to a minimum. It's a 3 step process, clean, etch, and coat. It needs 3 days for it to dry. I do the same for steel carb bowls.

I also install in line fuel filters.

I never had to replace a carb on one of my machines.

A little prevention/preparation saves a lot of trouble down the road.
 

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less problems with sediment.
"less" being the operative word. I haven't seen a steel fuel tank in about 30 years. Nevertheless, I have cleaned gunk out of various plastic tanks I've owned. I agree regarding an in-line fuel filter, but in this case there is barely enough room for a valve, let alone a filter.
 

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"less" being the operative word. I haven't seen a steel fuel tank in about 30 years. Nevertheless, I have cleaned gunk out of various plastic tanks I've owned. I agree regarding an in-line fuel filter, but in this case there is barely enough room for a valve, let alone a filter.
The 3x 30 HD has a huge steel tank. I was able to use an MTD filler inlet strainer without any problem. I'll be taking apart the housing to see where I can fit a valve in. Looks like I have rood for a disc-type filter right before the engine fuel input port. I'll post pictures once it's done.
 

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A steel tank? really? Then I stand corrected. Well, perhaps they're cheaper in China than a rotomolded plastic one. You learn something new every day.
 
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