Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious what other users do if they rarely used their snowblower this winter.

I'm planning to put my snowblower away for the season. I live in Southwestern CT, so only ran it once this season for about 30 minutes to remove around 4 inches of wet snow. I always drain the gas tank and then run the engine dry, but am wondering if I should still drain the oil even though I only ran the engine once this season.

The oil was last changed the previous spring when I put it away for the season. I only use synthetic oil and the machine is a 15 year old Ariens 926 Pro in excellent condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
I live in Ct, as well, so my situation is similar to yours. I see no reason to change the oil but most other maintenance is a good idea including dealing with gas and applying lubricant as typical. Also, put a nice wax on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,698 Posts
I also live in CT, and would not change any 5W30 Full Synthetic oil.

I never drain any tank or empty any carburetor on any of my many small engines. I always have Stabil and half the rate of SeaFoam in all my gas. Been fine doing that my whole life, never had any issues with gas what's so ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Throwing out the welcome mat for your first post.Hearty greetings from Gettysburg
 

·
Account closed by member request.
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
Just Leave It In There It will Be Fine. ALOHA From The Paradise City. :smiley-rpg027::smiley-rpg027::smiley-rpg027::smiley-rpg027::smiley-rpg027:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I also live in CT, and would not change any 5W30 Full Synthetic oil.

I never drain any tank or empty any carburetor on any of my many small engines. I always have Stabil and half the rate of SeaFoam in all my gas. Been fine doing that my whole life, never had any issues with gas what's so ever.
Do you periodically run your snow blower engine during the summer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
I'm in NJ and under use, 3-5 times a year, I change it every 5 years. I haven't used it for 2 years so I'll skip it for those 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
thanks everyone for the quick responses! And hope everyone has an opportunity to enjoy the nice spring weather we'll be getting!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,803 Posts
thanks everyone for the quick responses! And hope everyone has an opportunity to enjoy the nice spring weather we'll be getting!
is it garaged or outside.? I'm thinking condensation if left outside in sun. I usually change my oil in late fall but you should be okay after one use. be sure to check it before starting after a long lay off next winter.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
I'd leave it and in the fall fire it up for just a few minutes and see how it looks. If it's getting a bit milky or hazy then you might want to change it out while the weather is still nice. If it's still clean looking, I'd run it another year. Will likely do it myself this year as the one blower has barely been used and the other one not at all.


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
If the water content in oil is too high then the oil needs to be replaced. It's less likely that the oil would have accumulated too much water if seldom operated during the Winter.

The engine crankcase is vented to atmosphere which generally has much less humidity during the Winter. As the hot engine cools down, hot air inside the crankcase cools. The air molecules within the crankcase move closer together as they become cooler, therefore, this air inside the engine would take up less space within the fixed volume of the crankcase.

As a result, the air pressure inside the crankcase becomes lower than the atmospheric pressure outside the crankcase. This causes outside air to enter the crankcase via the vent; equalizing the respective air pressures. As the engine cools, any humidity in the atmosphere then condenses into liquid water which contaminates the oil; warranting oil replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I just finished reading an article where someone ran their machine for 10+ years without an oil change for an excuse to buy electric, . Doing a story for Popular Science, a sample of the oil was sent to a special lab for testing to see how corrupt the oil had become. The final verdict? The oil was fine. It showed to be a little high in Silicone but that could be from the intake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,313 Posts
I just finished reading an article where someone ran their machine for 10+ years without an oil change for an excuse to buy electric, . Doing a story for Popular Science, a sample of the oil was sent to a special lab for testing to see how corrupt the oil had become. The final verdict? The oil was fine. It showed to be a little high in Silicone but that could be from the intake.
Good. What I thought. Why I change it every 7 years, 5 if I've used it 5 times a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I did my first oil change on a new machine after about 4 hours use but used a cheaper brand of oil from NAPA called "Husky" I think. Anyone heard of that one? I'm thinking I might just get it out of there and put a quality name in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I just finished reading an article where someone ran their machine for 10+ years without an oil change
To be honest, I just changed my oil on my 2002 Murray Craftsman last fall for the first time, so 17 years without an oil change. No sign of trouble, the oil was a little dark, that was all. I had a few years of heavy use with Nor'easters, but other years with no use at all not far from the Jersey Shore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
On new machine this year, I changed oil after 1st 4 hours of use. Then through lack of snow, I only ran it another 2 hours at most. It's synthetic 5W30. I'm leaving it in for next year.
I tend to change the oil in my small engines every year, but I'm borderline OCD. It doesn't cost much, and it feels traditional. As others have mentioned, you probably don't need to be so attentive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Most engine maintenance recommends oil changes based on either hours of operation or calendar time - whichever occurs first. The general calendar interval is 12 months.

Even if the engine has sat lightly used for 12 months, as others here have noted the oil can become contaminated with water (due to condensation) and even a few hours of operation can cause the oil to change its pH. Both can be rough on the engine, particularly seals. And as far as timing goes, you should change the oil in your snowblower engine when it is going INTO storage, so potentially contaminated oil doesn't sit in there for months and months.

Oil is cheap. Changing the oil is about the least expensive insurance policy you can possibly invest in for your engine. It's also not hard to change. Heck, on these engines there isn't even the expense of an oil filter. There's no really good reason not to change it, and a really good reason (protection of your engine) to do it.

YMMV, but I change my oil every single spring. Without fail. Takes ~10 minutes and under $10.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top