Snowblower Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys feel about oil changes people have differnt size drives. There are no hr. meters on blowers, like there are mowers. Some buy used blowers, and most do not come with a owners manual. So I, ask What is your rule of thumb for oil changes.
 

·
Registered
Simlicity 860EI, Ariens 22xxx, Powerlite
Joined
·
398 Posts
How do you guys feel about oil changes people have differnt size drives. There are no hr. meters on blowers, like there are mowers. Some buy used blowers, and most do not come with a owners manual. So I, ask What is your rule of thumb for oil changes.
Once a season, every season for me. Not many hours on it I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,658 Posts
What is your rule of thumb for oil changes.
Download the manual and follow the maintenance schedule therein. For brands that don't build their own engines, you'll need to download the engine's owners manual for that information. As Scott said, err on the side of caution and change the oil at least annually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
What is your rule of thumb for oil changes
At the end of season on each and every machine regardless of hours.
the expense is minimal so why not err on the safe side
Exactly. All of mine hold less than a quart. It also gives me peace of mind knowing any particular machine is ready to go/use (oil wise).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
Any time a machine comes to me, it gets an oil change. Always 5W30 Full Synthetic.

My own fleet of machines, each might see a once-a-year outing, so in my situation, it could be years before one performs a couple outings.

Certainly, if the average homeowner takes their machine out and works it say 8 to ten times in a season, they may want to consider changing it. If you only use it a couple times, then in my opinion, going more than one year is no issue.

Changing oil in a small machine is going to be an individual case by case basis. When you are not sure, put a piece of masking tape in an inconspicuous place and mark the date of oil change, and even its outings if you can't remember its uses.

Unfortunately, many just run it and never change the oil, and some don't even check it every time they use it, which can be detrimental on the OHV, or any engine.

BTW, common sense dictates that oil is not supposed to be black and sludge ... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,730 Posts
I AGAIN agree with Oneacer regarding oil changes. I use only synthetic oil in my blowers and Dino oil in my mowers. The latter being people give me Dino oil because it's old, not suitable for their newer car, or they no longer are changing their car or lawnmower oil anymore.

Use common sense regarding how often you change the oil based on how often you use it and how much. I look at my oil and I smell it to make the decision to change it. Where I am in NJ, I may use my snowblower 0-5 times a year. I go 5-7 years before I change my snowblower's oil. My lawnmower, I go 3-5 years because of a small lawn, 10-15 minutes, however I sell my mowers before I change the oil sometimes giving the buyer fresh oil. If I take a mower in to fix and sell, if the oil really needs to be changed, I do it, otherwise I wait until it's sold.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darby

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,191 Posts
Once a season for my snow blowers and lawnmowers.
But keep an eye on them, check level before every use.
When I do change it it looks like new, but I change it anyway.

Where can I find a can of Dino oil?
That would be nice for my shelf. :love:


Tin Ingredient Tin can Drink Wood
 
  • Like
Reactions: meierjn

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
I'm a big fan of keeping fresh oil in any stored engine, so the oil in the snow blower gets changed -at least- every spring before hibernation. Moisture and other combustion byproducts conspire to create acids in the oil, and there's no reason to let that chew on internal engine bits during the off-season.

There are very inexpensive tach/hourmeter units available for OPE. Installing one is typically as easy as adding a sense wire from the engine, wrapped around the plug wire, to wherever you mount the display. Typically less than $20 to buy, new button batteries every few years, and you have a good idea of how many hours the engine has run. Decide then on your maintenance interval. I change the oil at 20-25 hour intervals. YIMV.

Another easy way to keep track of use and wear is to change the oil after every 10 (or your number) gallons of fuel is used. With a 5-gal fuel can, this gets amazingly simple. Fuel-consumed is closely related to work done by the engine, and may be better than just run hours when planning maintenance. It still gets fresh oil before storage, as part of the pre-hibernation routine.

Like many others here, I'm a religious consumer of synthetic oil in all the motorized toys. Two of my daily-driver cars use the same 5W-20 and 5W-30 oil grades that the snow blower engine likes, so there's always a supply of that on the shelf. The 5-qt jugs of Mobil-1 are under $30 at the local Wal-Mart, and take care of the needs here. While opinions seem to vary a lot on break-in of new engines, mine is that break-in is the first stage of wear-out. So new engines get an initial short run with what they came with, then get swapped to synthetic for the rest of their lives. New car comes home from the dealer, and immediately gets synthetic swapped in. OPE gets an initial warm-up with whatever came in it, then immediately swapped for synthetic. OPE gets a second change after the first real use under load, then moves to a more conventional service schedule. No oil-related engine failures in 30+ years, including race/performance engines. Cheap insurance, even if it seems to some to be 'excessive'. Call it a learned habit, maybe.

Overall, the best guidance might be to check the oil level and condition -religiously-. The normal shutdown routine is to move the throttle to idle speed, close the fuel shutoff valve and let it run all the fuel out of the carburetor. Let the engine cool some and refill the fuel tank. Then drag it inside, check/adjust the skid shoes and the oil level. Do this after every use, and you won't get caught missing these critical steps in your hurry to go out and play in the snow the next time.

I installed a simple Hobbs hour meter under the console when I first got the machine. It connects to the alternator wires there, the ones that feed the headlights whenever the engine is running. I added a few diodes as a little rectifier to convert alternator AC to meter DC. Since then especially after reading some tips in the maintenance forum here, I'd probably go with the tach/hour meter combo give the option. But the little Hobbs is pretty bulletproof, never needs batteries, can't be accidentally reset. It will do for me on this machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Once every two years which amounts to about 2 hours of total use. It doesn't cost much so why not.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top