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Quick question for you guys, I have a 1232 that's been in the family since new. It's probably only had one or two oil changes in its life. I'm going to change the oil, is it okay to go full synthetic or should I just stick w regular dino? They call for 5w30
 

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Depends on the age of the unit. Older engines had seal and gaskets incompatible with synthetics. I'm not certain when the cut-off was but I'd guess about 15 years ago. If you are in doubt use conventional. With the amount of use a snowblower gets conventional is fine. I use a synthetic though I doubt I'll live long enough to see the benefit.
 

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my 521E is a 1986 and I switched to synthetic oil with no problems afterward
 

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I have been running 10w-30 full syn. in all O.P.E. equipment for years now. From my 1967 Craftsman snow blower , 1969 Craftsman lawn tractor, 1982 JD 111 tractor, 1987 Bolens snow blower, etc. with no leakage and less oil consumption. Merry Christmas.......:)
 

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might be opening a can of worms but im gonna go for it anyways... :)
why 10w30 in NJ vs manufacture spec of 5w30?
 

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might be opening a can of worms but im gonna go for it anyways... :)
why 10w30 in NJ vs manufacture spec of 5w30?

"why 10w30 in NJ vs manufacture spec of 5w30?[/QUOTE]"... Good question. I'd like to know the relational as well.
 

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From... Car Bibles : The Engine Oil Bible

"There was a time, years ago, when switching between synthetic oils and mineral oils was not recommended if you had used one product or the other for a long period of time. People experienced problems with seals leaking and high oil consumption but changes in additive chemistry and seal material have taken care of those issues. And that's an important caveat. New seal technology is great, but if you're still driving around in a car from the 80's with its original seals, then this argument becomes a bit of a moot point - your seals are still going to be subject to the old leakage problems no matter what newfangled additives the oil companies are putting in their products.

Read more: Car Bibles : The Engine Oil Bible "
 

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10w30 synthetic gives better protection and flows the same as 5w30. TRUST ME run the 10w30 stuff it does not get freaky cold out there in snookie land / jersey shore.
 

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Quick question for you guys, I have a 1232 that's been in the family since new. It's probably only had one or two oil changes in its life. I'm going to change the oil, is it okay to go full synthetic or should I just stick w regular dino? They call for 5w30
With only one or two oil changes in its life there are some things that may need to be considered. If you have had to occasionally add oil, assuming you have a Tecumseh engine, you might want to stick with dino oil. If you have had to add oil it might be wise to do a piston soak with a product like MMO, your engine will last longer with clean rings than dirty rings.

Is it safe to assume that this snow blower is a 1998 model, with only 1 or 2 oil changes you may have some deposits inside your engine that could lead to problems if you start using synthetic, might not happen. If this machine was getting yearly oil changes then I would have no problems saying synthetic oil is the way to go.
 

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If it's only had occasional oil changes I'd use an oil that's known for cleaning like conventional Pennzoil (the one in the yellow bottle) on a few short oil changes to help clean out the engine. Change the oil, blow snow 2-3 times, change again. Use cheap oil first to get the engine cleaned up, then use full synthetic for longer changes.
 

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What happens is the detergents in synthetics are superior to dino, so the seals/gaskets get cleaned-out more and expose leaks or weak gaskets that are already there. Synthetics do not cause damage or oil leaks directly, only indirectly through their better cleaning properties. Stick with 5w30, not 10w30 for winter use in your blower. Nothing wrong with a quality dino oil, remember your engine can't read labels.
 

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I would break-in a new engine using just dino oil ... but it's not what you might think. New OPE engines shed a LOT of metal when brand new and I will change it 3 times before the 10-12 hour mark. No sense in running synthetic then dumping it after just a few hours. Run the dino to start then switch to synthetic when you are ready to go "normal" oil change intervals (or an entire season).

However, I don't think the engine will not break-in properly using synthetic. I just don't buy it. Looking at UOAs for a decade, I don't think you get lower wear with synthetics. They simply take temperature extremes better ... and last longer (especially when filtered properly).

Even with older engines, newer synthetics have better seal conditioners than they used to (the original PAO formulations from decades ago had all sorts of problems).

Still a bit leery? Then use a "High Mileage" synthetic oil ... they are designed to be used with older engines and older seals.

I broke my machine with "whatever" leftover oil and now use Yeti Blood:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee149/BrorJace/Oil%20Analysis/Chevron_Delo_0W-30_large.jpg
 

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"10w30 synthetic gives better protection and flows the same as 5w30."

All things being equal, 10W30 should be a bit more shear stable than 5W30 which (should) use a few more polymers to bridge the gap between the base number and the at-temp number. Again, all things being equal, the greater the spread, the less shear-stable the formulation will be.

Except that things are almost never equal ... just remember that. ;)

As for cold flow, the 5W30 (should) flow a touch better in the extreme cold.

I say "should" because oil formulations are subject to changes every several months and the ratings are subject to marketing as well. Some companies like Amsoil, Red Line Oil, etc ... sell straight weight synthetic oils (with no polymers) that would easily qualify as multi-vis oils. But the hardcore racers want a straight weight, so that's how it's labeled. :)
 

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Go ahead, switch to synthetic, it wont affect oil consumption, but even if it did there's all of 2 seals involved anyway both of which can be replaced without taking the short block apart.
 
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