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1977 Yard Man Snowbird 8/26
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Tecumseh HM80 that I'd like to repaint in the summer, and am looking for a few tips. I know there are a lot of Youtube videos on the subject...I'm looking for input from my trusted friends here!

The engine is that off-black paint common on this type of engine: it's mostly black, but has a subtle green/blue tinge. I'm leaning toward just using a quality black engine paint, but being OC, this means I'll want to repaint all parts to be consistent. My goal is to make it look fresh and also hold off rust.

Without cracking open the crankcase, it looks like I'll have to take apart most of the engine, apply a paint remover, sand, mask, and paint. I'm looking specifically for a good paint remover that won't ruin the crankcase gasket, as well as a decent engine paint (gloss) that will hold up on the aluminum and steel parts, and resist the occasional gas/oil drips.

Thanks, and I'll post pics when I do this.
 

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Really all depends on how much OC you have, and to what time and effort you are willing to put in.

Usually I will pressure wash it, then I usually take off most stuff like gas tank, cowl (flywheel cover), heater box, carburetor, etc. .... then I seal all openings as not to damage engine, then I clean and prep with an orange de-greaser, brush and scraper where needed ... then I wipe down with isopropyl alcohol, then prime it, then paint it. .... I don't normally use high temp paint on engine itself, but If you decide to paint the rusted muffler, make sure you use high temp paint.
 

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+1 on what Oneacer described. Proper prep is critical, and I would be leary of paint remover on seals, etc. Most engine paints are fine.
 

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1977 Yard Man Snowbird 8/26
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So with the paint that's currently on the engine: sand away the loose stuff, maybe use a brass wire brush, clean it, and paint?

For things without seals, like the heat box and cowling, I suspect paint remover would be the step before the items listed above?

Thanks!
 

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I wouldn't use stripper, sanding should be plenty. You can smooth out the pits that way and paint will adhere to a scuffed surface. If it's bad, start with 120, finish with maybe 220 grit. Purple power is a highly effective, economical degreaser. Treat rust before painting if you have any, naval jelly is a good, easy to use product, or electrolysis if you want to go all out. 3 part paint from an auto shop is the best you can get without powder coating or Kynar, I used some on my aluminum rims several years ago and it still looks flawless many thousands of miles later through salt, grease, and grime, but most would say anything over a rattle can is overkill for the average small engine. I just use Rustoleum on all mine. The 2x is a good product, usually best to prime first even though it says it's 2 in 1.
 

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I have never been as fussy as you are planning to be but have had good luck with Rusoleum engine paint. I ususally remove loose paint. I may wire brush or pressure wash if very dirty/greasy. with a some purple power or similar. I never prime. Maybe I should but the Rustoleum engine paint seems to adhere well to bare Alum and Steel and holds up well enough. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I'm attaching a couple pics to show the current state. If anyone has specific tips based on what you see (e.g., best way to prep the head fins) then please offer your ideas. I have a jug of Evapo-Rust that can be put to use on the steel parts.
 

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Thanks for all the advice. I'm attaching a couple pics to show the current state. If anyone has specific tips based on what you see (e.g., best way to prep the head fins) then please offer your ideas. I have a jug of Evapo-Rust that can be put to use on the steel parts.
Use a good automotive primer and paint for any parts made of steel. Any aluminum parts should be primed with self etching primer-such as rustoleum self etching primer - and then automotive paint. Any parts with fins-don’t paint. The fins are for for cooling purposes. Hope this helps.
 

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GM has a color called gunmetal grey that is very close to that engine, I do not know if it comes in a high temp air dry enamel.
 
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