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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Over the summer I rescued an old MTD snowblower from the curb, model is 310-586. An old beast that wouldn't start, but with a new carb, oil change and plug roared back to life.

Problem is, we just got our first snowfall of the season, about 2 inches of wet, heavy slop and after a few minutes of blowing it seemed like the chute kept getting clogged and the impeller jammed with ice. It got to the point where it would die as soon as I engaged the auger. It looked like the snow/ice was getting past and around the impeller. Surprising to me that a beast like this couldn't handle 2 inches of snow. I did spray the chute, auger and impeller/housing with teflon spray prior to blowing.

Anyone have any ideas on how to improve this? I know it's wet, heavy crap that lot of snowblowers struggle with but I'm a bit worried about when snow starts coming consistently in in greater amounts. Design flaw? New auger belt maybe?
 

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That heavy, wet slop defeats most snowblowers. It happens to me every 1.5 years around here. Some here recommend an impeller kit. My snowblower spits out bricks of ice for awhile before it quits.
 

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Wet heavy stuff gives most trouble, a impeller kit will help a lot especially with the impeller getting iced up but the wet heavy stuff is sticky slop that clogs most machines up.
 

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mlauson,
welcome to the forum!
what you experienced is actually perfectly normal for most 2-stage snowblowers, especially older ones, regardless of brand. They just aren't well equipped for small amounts of wet slushy snow, they aren't designed for it.

they excel at 4" or more of "dry" cold snow.. They are best at 25F ( -4C) or colder.

For most people who need a 2-stage, that kind of snow is rare, and usually only happens in early and late winter, when we get that first wet slop and slush.

IMO, the best thing to do with that kind of snow is.. nothing. ;)

When the temp is hovering right around 32F/0C, it will likely melt away naturally within 24 hours anyway.

If you live in a climate that gets *mostly* wet slush, say: Virginia, then a single stage snowblower is best for that kind of snow. That's what they are designed for.

Just wait until you get "real" snow, then your snowblower will likely perform just fine..

Yes, as others have said, can install an "impeller kit" that does help with slush.
I bought a kit about 8 years ago for my 1971 Ariens..I haven't installed it yet! ;)
because the need for it only happens once or twice a year.. 90% of the time my snowblower is fine without it. But it is an option for slush that many people say works great.

Scot
 

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the impeller kit is magical!....I did my first on an old Jacobsen that I had refurbed, and when I went to try it on 4 inches of slush...it responded by clogging and such.....a half hour in the shop and two out of four impellers worked on, and Viola! I'm throwing slush across the street. My neighbor Bub ( RIP) came out and said " What the F**k did you do to that blower???/....don't even own a blower without out the "kit"....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like the impeller kit is pretty straightforward...I won't have to take the whole front end off and all that jazz. I'll try that over the next few days and hope for better results next time!

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks. I was hoping this wasn't too strange of a result but what you're stating makes sense. Looks like with that gap between the impeller and housing the slush and ice was just being continually pushed past the impeller around the sides and gumming up the whole works.

I'll probably be putting on a DIY impeller kit; I'm sure my wife will be thrilled that I'm working on the snowblower again.
 
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