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Since I am doing a complete overhaul on my Ariens,I started thinking, is it worth the trouble to put in 1/16 plastic lining in the chute like the yamaha has, Does it help that much or is it just a slight upgrade. I would LOVE to be able to put the snow on the other side of the street when clearing the sidewalk LOL, But will the lining really help in distance or is it more to just stop the wet stuff from sticking.
 

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I think it will help stop rust, and stop snow from sticking. There is a recent thread about the material to use. I believe that UHMW is recommended.
 

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Since I am doing a complete overhaul on my Ariens,I started thinking, is it worth the trouble to put in 1/16 plastic lining in the chute like the yamaha has, Does it help that much or is it just a slight upgrade. I would LOVE to be able to put the snow on the other side of the street when clearing the sidewalk LOL, But will the lining really help in distance or is it more to just stop the wet stuff from sticking.
The stock Yamaha's have closer to a 1/8" formed piece of Teflon for the chute, the 1028 and 1332 have about a 1/4" piece lining the impeller housing also.

I used a 1/16" sheet of UHMW plastic during my rebuild for several reasons. First, it will protect the paint and metal from premature damage and rusting; it most definitely prevents snow and ice build up, especially after the type of sticky snow we had today, my chute remained perfectly clear after several hours of heavy use; due to the ultra low friction properties and added abrasion resistance of both Teflon and UHMW it most definitely aids in snow evacuation and increased throwing distance but by how much I cannot say. I can certainly see a distinct snow pattern when turning the chute side to side created by the plastic liner when shooting straight up. The benefits outweigh any reason not to install it. The hardest part is fitting a template and cutting it to shape in the plastic sheet. Increasing the distance is best gained by an impeller modification either with a liner to reduce clearance or zero clearance extensions on the impeller itself. Good Luck!
 

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Of course "stopping the wet stuff from sticking" would go a long way toward improving distance. And, in my opinion, is more important than distance. I think the answer comes in your evaluating your machine. If snow is sticking to the chute, your effectiveness is being impacted and there's several things you can do including a chute lining. If on the other hand, your chute's not clogging improving the chute is of little consequence in terms of distance..
 

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Improving the Chute is of LARGE Consequence. Chute Upgrade on 10000 series is like Night and Day for Throwing Distance.
 

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The stock Yamaha's have closer to a 1/8" formed piece of Teflon for the chute, the 1028 and 1332 have about a 1/4" piece lining the impeller housing also.

I used a 1/16" sheet of UHMW plastic during my rebuild for several reasons. First, it will protect the paint and metal from premature damage and rusting; it most definitely prevents snow and ice build up, especially after the type of sticky snow we had today, my chute remained perfectly clear after several hours of heavy use; due to the ultra low friction properties and added abrasion resistance of both Teflon and UHMW it most definitely aids in snow evacuation and increased throwing distance but by how much I cannot say. I can certainly see a distinct snow pattern when turning the chute side to side created by the plastic liner when shooting straight up. The benefits outweigh any reason not to install it. The hardest part is fitting a template and cutting it to shape in the plastic sheet. Increasing the distance is best gained by an impeller modification either with a liner to reduce clearance or zero clearance extensions on the impeller itself. Good Luck!
Where did you purchase the sheet of material?
 

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Improving the Chute is of LARGE Consequence. Chute Upgrade on 10000 series is like Night and Day for Throwing Distance.
Jackmels, you're emphatic and obviously knowledgeable on what you say so I'd appreciate your helping me out with this because I'm not familiar with 10000 series chutes. What is it about these chutes that make them so susceptible to sticking snow that adding a liner would always make a substantial improvement?
 

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You can Google it, you can order online from Walmart, Home Depot, many plastic places even locally, Grainger's. It's polyethylene, very common, even comes in colors though white is the most common, black next. You can get it in different widths, sheets, as tape, and with an adhesive backing. You may be able to attach it with a contact cement or construction adhesive but generally best would be attached with #6 stainless machine screws using washers and torque nuts or similar.
 

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Your Quote "improving the chute is of little consequence in terms of distance" is Incorrect. Anyone who Mods their Own equipment Knows this.
 

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Your Quote "improving the chute is of little consequence in terms of distance" is Incorrect. Anyone who Mods their Own equipment Knows this.
Jackmels, I certainly don't mind being quoted and say plenty of things that are incorrect, but I don't like someone taking only part of what I said to give the impression I'm incorrect and then criticize me for it.

What I said was:
If on the other hand, your chute's not clogging improving the chute is of little consequence in terms of distance.

The concept I was trying to make is entirely correct: if the chute is not a problem, correcting it will be of little consequence. And note that the original question concerned degree of improvement so what I said is entirely correct.
 

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First, it will protect the paint and metal from premature damage and rusting;
Protect from damage yes, that's obvious..but protect from rusting? hmmm..im not so sure.
it seems that the lining could trap water (often salty water) between the lining and the chute, which could actually cause and accelerate rusting,
because you cant get to the water to wipe it down, and it cant easily evaporate..

just throwing that out there! ;)

Scot
 

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Jackmels, you're emphatic and obviously knowledgeable on what you say so I'd appreciate your helping me out with this because I'm not familiar with 10000 series chutes. What is it about these chutes that make them so susceptible to sticking snow that adding a liner would always make a substantial improvement?
I don't think JackMels was referring specifically to the 10000 chutes that make them susceptible to sticking snow, I took it as adding a liner to any chute would make a difference, a substantial improvement to reduce friction thus both throwing the snow further which may not be an issue nor necessary but the clogging issue and wet snow issue is a problem. With any wet snow you generally have to put the blower in a lower gear thus slowing down your time getting the job done.
 

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Can someone please do a little write up of what exactly they used, and the procedure that they used to adhere it to their chute. I have wanted to do this, but it seems like there are too many options of what material to use.

Thanks !
 

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Can someone please do a little write up of what exactly they used, and the procedure that they used to adhere it to their chute. I have wanted to do this, but it seems like there are too many options of what material to use.

Thanks !
Search GregNL as he has extensive experience regarding liners. He has experimented and failed and found the best way to do it. He attaches it using either #4 or #6 stainless machine screws and nylon locknut. I prefer oval locknuts or centerlock nuts.
 

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Where did you purchase the sheet of material?
Since you're in Nova Scotia, visit your local Acklands Grainger, they can order it through the Grainger division in the US. I ordered UHMW plastic "film" as it's 1/16" thick, 24" x 24" was the size.


Protect from damage yes, that's obvious..but protect from rusting? hmmm..im not so sure.
it seems that the lining could trap water (often salty water) between the lining and the chute, which could actually cause and accelerate rusting,
because you cant get to the water to wipe it down, and it cant easily evaporate..

just throwing that out there! ;)

Scot
No missing paint from rock chips or snow/ice abrasion, no rust. It's not 100% fail safe. That's like saying you rust proofed your car with any type of product be it liquid or rubberized and expecting it to eliminate 100% of the rusting, not happening but it will dramatically reduce the amount that would have formed if it were not protected, at least if living in any location that relies heavily on salt during the winter or has high year round humidity like in NL. I get what you are saying about water being trapped between the liner and the chute and it may pose an issue, that's something I'll have to keep an eye on. For now I've been spraying Teflon down between them. I'm just following Yamaha's lead and design concept on their new machines and so far it's working. If I can go 1 or 2 winters or more without having to sand, prime and repaint the chute then to me it's doing what it's supposed to. If it was new factory paint or powder coat then I'd expect it to last even longer from damage or rusting.

Can someone please do a little write up of what exactly they used, and the procedure that they used to adhere it to their chute. I have wanted to do this, but it seems like there are too many options of what material to use.

Thanks !
I originally posted the modification in my Yamaha YS624 Rebuild thread. It's not step by step but it will give you an idea how to proceed.

It's also been discussed here http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/snowblower-repairs-maintenance-forum/107521-what-type-plastic-snow-sleds-carpet-made.html?highlight=uhmw and here http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/snowblower-repairs-maintenance-forum/107289-using-roll-up-plastic-snow-sled-material-line-chute.html?highlight=uhmw
 

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Protect from damage yes, that's obvious..but protect from rusting? hmmm..im not so sure.
it seems that the lining could trap water (often salty water) between the lining and the chute, which could actually cause and accelerate rusting,
because you cant get to the water to wipe it down, and it cant easily evaporate..

just throwing that out there! ;)

Scot
No missing paint from rock chips or snow/ice abrasion, no rust.
ok, well that's a valid point.
but only if the paint is pristine to start with! ;)
if you have any pre-existing scrapes or gouges, I could see where adding a plastic liner could potentially make rusting worse, because of holding in the moisture.

just something I considered, and wanted to add it to the mix..

Scot
 

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To solve the water penetration problem, run a thin bead of clear or white caulk along the edges. Or better yet, before you tighten it, smear some caulk, a very thin layer on the fastening side before tightening down.

Paint does not rust, metal rusts, and it rusts when it is exposed. The metal gets exposed when it wears from abrasion in a spot, or chips, then water gets behind and moves along getting behind the paint rusting further and lifting the paint. By the insertion of a plastic liner over a good surface that is already good or has been properly prepared and painted using an oil based paint then caulked, there shouldn't be any rusting or deterioration of the metal.
 

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ok, well that's a valid point.
but only if the paint is pristine to start with! ;)
if you have any pre-existing scrapes or gouges, I could see where adding a plastic liner could potentially make rusting worse, because of holding in the moisture.

just something I considered, and wanted to add it to the mix..

Scot
Definitely a good point! Personally, I'd highly recommend removing all and any rust, then priming and painting, even clear coat for added protection prior to installing a liner. Then again, some people may not be up for that project and just want the liner in place as snow is sticking in the chute.

Another added benefit, it reduces the chute size/area, which can be important on the older models, as it helps channel the snow better and can aid in increased throwing distance, much like the tall narrow chutes on many newer machines. It worked great on my father's 80's model John Deere. My Yamaha had a torn up black plastic slide as a liner bolted in place when I bought it. I just installed a new one that fit much better and should also be longer lasting.

Paint does not rust, metal rusts, and it rusts when it is exposed. The metal gets exposed when it wears from abrasion in a spot, or chips, then water gets behind and moves along getting behind the paint rusting further and lifting the paint. By the insertion of a plastic liner over a good surface that is already good or has been properly prepared and painted using an oil based paint then caulked, there shouldn't be any rusting or deterioration of the metal.
Proper preparation is key in that. I don't expect the paint on my chute to last indefinitely before rusting again as I only removed what I could by sanding and with a wire wheel, not sandblasting or the use of a grinder to 100% new steel. The use of etching/zinc primer and a rust application paint will go a long way in providing protection though I expect it bubble out or rust to creep to the surface at some point.
 

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The chute that I am using on my machine now is an Ariens 23" chute with my original 11" chute added as an extension. I need this to get the snow over the fence down along my driveway. The paint inside the 23" chute is fine. There are some small and minor scratches or dings, what ever you want to call them. No paint is missing. When there is a little paint missing, I touch it up.

The original chute after 40 years of snow going through it, did lose paint, so I painted it. They get waxed a few times every summer and before a big storm. It takes care of the inside area just fine. I do not see why any one would have to add a plastic or metal sheet or... any thing like this?

If your chutes inside is worn, repaint it and maintain it. Unless you have a gravel driveway, I do feel sorry for you guys who have to clear them. I would not know how to solve the problem of clearing them and keeping the damage down to a minimal, unless you just keep an eye on how much damage you get over the winter and then make corrections during the summer.
 

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You pointed out exactly why one would want to install one, to eliminate painting it every time you get a rock chip or scratch. A micron film of wax is not going to protect the paint from such debris, especially if it's been repainted with just spray can primer/paint.

I was doing a neighbours driveway and sucked up a 2-3" piece of asphalt from the EOD the plow hooked up from a small newly formed hole in the road just a few feet away. I'm sure that scratched my now worn impeller housing that had pristine paint at the beginning of this season but my lined chute still looks new. I'm not about to remove the liner either as if I had a sudden change of mind that it serves no purpose. In fact, I plan to line the impeller housing as well. Unfortunately pristinely paved roads, curbs and sidewalks are not always the norm around here and perfectly flat driveways never stay that way so you never know what you'll encounter.

I've seen first hand on multiples machines the benefits, primarily paint protection and increased throwing distance.

What may be the ultimate solution to some is not always needed for others. That's like saying why pay for hand warmers when you can just wear gloves or options like LED lights when you can just turn on your outdoor lights. It's all in what you need to solve what's seen as an annoyance or problem.

Yamaha installs Teflon liners at the factory, for that I applaude them!
 
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