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Hello all,
1st post. Own Craftsman model 247.88790 and looking to see the possibilities of using the power feed from the lighting coil to power a car power window motor (as seen on many youtube videos) to move the chute. The videos all power with a 12-18 volt DC power tool battery. The lighting feed puts out 17 volts AC. I guessing that would have to be converted to DC to operating the car window motor? Any thoughts are welcome.

Please take this the right way..I can't believe I joined a snow blower forum. My daughter (16 y/o) almost disowned me when i showed her (not cool department). I'm thinking what has my life come to ...a snow blower forum? Maybe I should get out more? lol. But I have no regrets thus far. Read a bunch of posts, got some good ideas, see the wealth of knowledge here. But I'm still not telling any friends... lol. Thanks in advance for the help.
 

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You need to find out how many watts or amps the light coil produces, you probably can if it produces enough amps.
You'll need a regulator/rectifier added to the circuit to covert AC to DC and maintain 12-15V
 

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Welcome to the forum! Embrace the shame ;) There's a lot of good info here.

Using a battery helps ensure a sufficient supply of amps/watts when needed. Depending on your motor amperage/wattage draw, just the lighting coil may not be able to supply enough power.

One possibility could be a battery, connected to the coil, after converting the AC to DC, as you said. The coil could help keep the battery charged while running, and the battery could supply a bunch of amps when required. Any time you aren't turning the chute, the coil would be charging the battery.

This assumes that what the coil is putting out is a suitable voltage for keeping the battery charged, however. If you converted the coil's output to DC, you could also use a DC->DC voltage regulator to reduce the voltage to something like 13V, if you opted to use a 12V lead-acid battery.

To be honest, just using a battery is probably simpler, and stick it on the charger between uses. And for conversions like these, people have mentioned keeping some way to control it manually. If, during a storm, the motor fails, a wire comes loose, etc, you don't want to realize you've gone from a manual chute control, to NO chute control, because the motor won't turn the chute.
 

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Two 6V SLA batteries wired in series should be plenty of power. Then trickle charge them. I use two of them for starting in a Toro 21 Personal Pace lawn mower. They are $15-$20 each, depending on Amp hrs. Or a motorcycle battery if you have the mounting space.
 
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