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Anyone know the thread size of the oil plugs on the engine? I'm going to put a 90 degree bend,on/off valve, and a cap. Just getting the machine prepped for this winter
 

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I think the 10 MM drain zit is the correct one, but I never got one to actually figure it out. I don't remember what I researched for the thread pitch, but if you find something cheap that works do share for the rest of us.
 

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on one of my greyhound engines which uses the same 10mm standard thread, I re tapped the hole to 1/4" npt. the hole is close enough in size that you can just run the tape through it slowly. I packed my tap with grease to help capture any aluminum chips. I did mine when the engine needed an oil change. Put the engine on and incline away from the drain hole remove the drain plug and tap it. after taping it put your 1/4" nipple in the hole and drain the old oil out. I strained my old oil and ran it through the engine again just to flush out any possibility of there being any left over chips from the tap. after the old oil drains put the cap on you pipe and refill with new oil.
 

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That Drainzit looks like a great idea. But it seems a little expensive at $20.

The drain plug thread on the Predator is a M10-1.25 straight machine thread.

Carl has a good idea on re-tapping it for a 1/4 NPT as he did on his Greyhound.

But ...You need to make sure there is enough wall thickness to open it up!

The tap drill for a 1/4 NPT is 7/16 and the OD of the thread is .540.

As an alternative you could use an adaptor that goes from the Male M10-1.25 to 1/8 NPT (or similar) as the one shown in the link. From there you can put an elbow and appropriate length nipple on it. Or use a hose barb and put on a rubber hose like the DrainZit concept. Such adaptors are often found at a good auto parts store or a plumbing supply.

Just some ideas that are a bit more economical and allow you to optimize it for your application.

http://www.brakeconnect.com/product-category/thread-changers
 

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That Drainzit looks like a great idea. But it seems a little expensive at $20.

The drain plug thread on the Predator is a M10-1.25 straight machine thread.

Carl has a good idea on re-tapping it for a 1/4 NPT as he did on his Greyhound.

But ...You need to make sure there is enough wall thickness to open it up!

The tap drill for a 1/4 NPT is 7/16 and the OD of the thread is .540.

As an alternative you could use an adaptor that goes from the Male M10-1.25 to 1/8 NPT (or similar) as the one shown in the link. From there you can put an elbow and appropriate length nipple on it. Or use a hose barb and put on a rubber hose like the DrainZit concept. Such adaptors are often found at a good auto parts store or a plumbing supply.

Just some ideas that are a bit more economical and allow you to optimize it for your application.

Thread Changers - BrakeConnect

For Pete sake It's only $20. And the time and effort saved in not having to run around just looking the parts and then buying them to make your own Drainzit kit is worth way more than just $20 to me.

Yes, I too am sort of cheap (Predator repower instead of buying a new snow blower). But this is sort of like buying double ply toliet paper and splitting it into 2 rolls for the same price. Not worth it to me because just buying the parts alone let the time saved putting a drain kit togather for the convenience of the premade ready to bolt on drainzit kit are definitely worth $20.00 cost of the item.

Here is were I saved my money. I made my own bailer belt impeller kit for my snowblower for way less money than $36.00 that Clarence sells his kit for. It cost me about $5.00 in parts and works every bit as good as his kit does and I save $31.00. Plus you still got to install the Clarence kit into your snowblower unlike the prethreaded to the correct size just bolt in the drain hole of your engine and your done of the Drainzit. The Drainzit is a great deal!
 

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Wow...with all do respect I never expected such a strong response! I do understand your points.

I am only giving people information and ideas that work for a variety of situations. Folks can use them as they see fit. Or not.

If you only change the oil once a year, as many do, it is not that big of a deal. So it may get a bit messy. If you can easily take the wheel off and put down a piece of sheet metal, alum foil or wax paper. It doesn't seem too bad for a once a year activity.

Every one has a different financial situation and time constraints. If you are changing your oil several times through out the winter it may make a lot of sense to use the drainzit or make your own. I am not judging anyone, but for me, the $26 (with the shipping) is not worth it.

Less than 10 bucks in fittings from your local plumbing supply or auto store and you can achieve the same thing.
 

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I guess it is not so popular as I expected. Sorry if you feel mislead.

I know it is somewhat common size for oil plugs.

In light of this the Drain Zit wins.

I just did a quick Goolge and come up with this drain plug that comes in a m10-1.25. It has a valve built-in and a barb for a hose connection. It is more money than the drain zit and it is not clear if it would actually fit on a Predator sitting directly on the deck with out a riser.

Check out Fumoto F124N. I doubt this will be in your auto parts store and would likely be an internet purchase.

F124N | Fumoto Engine Oil Drain Valves

Next time I go to my local Auto part store I will take a look for such fittings and let you know what I find.
 

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Found the Drainzit Oil Drain Hose on Amazon same price but if you have Prime shipping
is free.Here is the link for it.

Hope this helps.

 

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Wow...with all do respect I never expected such a strong response! I do understand your points.

I am only giving people information and ideas that work for a variety of situations. Folks can use them as they see fit. Or not.

If you only change the oil once a year, as many do, it is not that big of a deal. So it may get a bit messy. If you can easily take the wheel off and put down a piece of sheet metal, alum foil or wax paper. It doesn't seem too bad for a once a year activity.

Every one has a different financial situation and time constraints. If you are changing your oil several times through out the winter it may make a lot of sense to use the drainzit or make your own. I am not judging anyone, but for me, the $26 (with the shipping) is not worth it.

Less than 10 bucks in fittings from your local plumbing supply or auto store and you can achieve the same thing.
I kind of agree, even in my climate a snow blower just doesn't get used enough to warrant it. I could see in a commercial setting or a lawn service that was changing the oil once a week...Frankly I'll just make a mess once, maybe twice a year. That's why they make oil dry :)
 

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I kind of agree, even in my climate a snow blower just doesn't get used enough to warrant it. I could see in a commercial setting or a lawn service that was changing the oil once a week...Frankly I'll just make a mess once, maybe twice a year. That's why they make oil dry :)
If you find a reasonably priced 10mm 1.25 threaded pipe please post it for others to buy. I tried 3 places that sold plumbing supplies and threaded fittings and no one sold a 10mm 1.25 threaded fitting. Otherwise $20 is much better than going all over looking for an uncommon fitting that no one seems to sell.
 

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If you find a reasonably priced 10mm 1.25 threaded pipe please post it for others to buy. I tried 3 places that sold plumbing supplies and threaded fittings and no one sold a 10mm 1.25 threaded fitting. Otherwise $20 is much better than going all over looking for an uncommon fitting that no one seems to sell.
Oh $20 is totally worth it not having to go high and low to find what you need to make the device. I was just saying I'd rather go without it all together then spend $20. Like I said it would only go on something I changed frequently like in a commercial setting. We average over 100"/year here and other then initial break in, the blower will most likely get a once a year change for me. For the record I have what I would consider to be a "normal" driveway and not a private road that some have to blow.

$20 is like 4-6 seasons of oil for the amount of hours most put on their blower. Of course that changes if you're using fancy oil which I do but deep down inside know is completely unnecessary for the application...
 

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Oh $20 is totally worth it not having to go high and low to find what you need to make the device. I was just saying I'd rather go without it all together then spend $20. Like I said it would only go on something I changed frequently like in a commercial setting. We average over 100"/year here and other then initial break in, the blower will most likely get a once a year change for me. For the record I have what I would consider to be a "normal" driveway and not a private road that some have to blow.

$20 is like 4-6 seasons of oil for the amount of hours most put on their blower. Of course that changes if you're using fancy oil which I do but deep down inside know is completely unnecessary for the application...
Why is using a high quality synthetic oil a waste. I use Amsoil in all my engines. Yes it is any where from $8 to $10 a quart yet I feel it has saved me at least the amount in additional expense in keeping my equipment in great shape. I have 347000 miles on my according to certain members on the forum worst of the worst car Hyundai Elantra.

I also own a 1986 Force 50 HP that I needed to replace the head gasket on this summer and both cylinder bores were smooth and looked like new. Also my 1996 Polaris XLT broke a bearing in the crank shaft in 2010 at 7200 miles and I was told that the engine would most likely need a total rebuild with all new pistons. Two days later I recieved a phone call from the shop. They asked me which oil I was using because they could not believe it and ran the calipers up and down the
Cylinders twice and they were still in specs and you could see the original hone marks yet on the cylinder walls.
 

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Why is using a high quality synthetic oil a waste. I use Amsoil in all my engines. Yes it is any where from $8 to $10 a quart yet I feel it has saved me at least the amount in additional expense in keeping my equipment in great shape. I have 347000 miles on my according to certain members on the forum worst of the worst car Hyundai Elantra.

I also own a 1986 Force 50 HP that I needed to replace the head gasket on this summer and both cylinder bores were smooth and looked like new. Also my 1996 Polaris XLT broke a bearing in the crank shaft in 2010 at 7200 miles and I was told that the engine would most likely need a total rebuild with all new pistons. Two days later I recieved a phone call from the shop. They asked me which oil I was using because they could not believe it and ran the calipers up and down the
Cylinders twice and they were still in specs and you could see the original hone marks yet on the cylinder walls.
Jesus man you might want to read my post closer. I didn't say it's a waste in everything. You seem quick on the trigger to argue. In a small engine with no oil filtration using one of the best synthetics you can buy is a waste. It can be beneficial in an extreme below zero cold start, that's about it.

PS I use AMSoil in everything too and like I said, it's overkill in my mower and snow blower :D

I use it in my car as well but I don't put more then 10k-15k a year and don't keep my cars for 20 years so it's actually overkill in those as well. Wal-mart supertech would get me to 150k just fine but I enjoy just changing my oil once a year with a quality synthetic which is probably overkill as well. I bet AMSoil signature series with their extended drain filter would test fine after 2 years in my vehicle with normal driving.

I tend to go big or go home, just like my snow blower purchase...but if you're on a tight budget running modern dino oil meeting the minimum required standards for the engine, and changing at least once a year will likely net you decades of reliable service on your blower, or lawn mower in a typical residential application....
 

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Jesus man you might want to read my post closer. I didn't say it's a waste in everything. You seem quick on the trigger to argue. In a small engine with no oil filtration using one of the best synthetics you can buy is a waste. It can be beneficial in an extreme below zero cold start, that's about it.

PS I use AMSoil in everything too and like I said, it's overkill in my mower and snow blower :D

I use it in my car as well but I don't put more then 10k-15k a year and don't keep my cars for 20 years so it's actually overkill in those as well. Wal-mart supertech would get me to 150k just fine but I enjoy just changing my oil once a year with a quality synthetic which is probably overkill as well. I bet AMSoil signature series with their extended drain filter would test fine after 2 years in my vehicle with normal driving.

I tend to go big or go home, just like my snow blower purchase...but if you're on a tight budget running modern dino oil meeting the minimum required standards for the engine, and changing at least once a year will likely net you decades of reliable service on your blower, or lawn mower in a typical residential application....

Over the years I met with many people who are sceptical of a High quality synthetic including members on this forum. Amsoil has proven it self time and time again and I use it in everything that requires an engine oil or 2 stroke oil. I'm going to drive my car until it has over 400,000. Unfortunately mine was made before Hyundia had the Elantra's with the timing chain. It may be overkill for a small engine but what the heck I don't buy cheap oil anyway. I even use Amsoil in my mini bike With the predator 212 cc engine. And my wife's sister drove it and she said that the fastest minibike she's ever ridden. A small engine has splash lubrication only and AMSOIL film strength is up to 10. times stronger than cheap non synthetic oil
 

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I guess we have gotten a bit off topic, albeit interesting.....

I see the major benefit of a synthetic oil in a snow blower is the cold weather starting benefits. That alone is enough for me to justify 20 oz. a year. When it comes to which brand is better etc. every one has an opinion. I like to stay away from this one. Just go on Bob is the oil guy and you can find tons of info...... and opinions.

Back to the topic on the thread title, as I want to follow up.

I went to a few local auto parts stores in the past few days and could not find an appropriate fitting in stock.

I few ideas did come to mind. I am not judging these on the practicality but just that they will they work. Everyone can decide how practical they may be for them.

1. Get a M10-1.25 oil plug. Drill it out and weld or braze on a steel tube or appropriate fitting.

2. Parker Hannafin makes face sealing fitting with machine threads and 3/8 hose barb on the other end. I Did not see an M10-1.25 but they make a 7/16-20 UNF. The tap drill is .3906 or 25/64. Which pretty much co-insides with the OD of an M10. (.394). If you tap the hole for this thread you are only removing the tread and adding the new 7/16 thread created by the tap.
Much less material removal than tapping it for the 1/4 NPT. Parker Hannifan Part number 685HB-6-4 or 1695HB-6-4 for a 90 degree elbow.

Other options which remove a bit more material but less than the 1/4 NPT approach are using an M12 x 1.5 face sealing fitting. Part number 68HB-M12

Again, Parker Hannifin has these fittings in their catalogue under SAE straight thread to barb, or Metric thread to barb. Start by looking at page 18 on the link below.

The o-ring is only rated to 160 degree F. That may be ok but you can replace it with a conventional oil plug fiber washer if you have a concern.

These fittings may be hard to find at an auto parts or hardware store. More than likely they would be at an industrial supply or order on line. I have not looked but please share where you may find them.

http://www.parker.com/literature/Brass%20Products/3501E-I.pdf
 

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This had come up last year and someone posted a link to a fitting on ebay that had m10-1.25 male threads with 1/4" NPT female on the other end. Unfortunately the fitting was around $15 and the link went dead.
 

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This had come up last year and someone posted a link to a fitting on ebay that had m10-1.25 male threads with 1/4" NPT female on the other end. Unfortunately the fitting was around $15 and the link went dead.
Well, I will say it again, "By the time you are done getting all the parts or drilling out or modifying an existing oil plug to accept a threaded tube or a threaded in oil fitting adapter let alone the value of your Time in putting this all togather:rolleyes:. Looks like the Drainzit At $20.00 wins again in cost effectiveness and sure simplicity and ease of use.

I have already bought 2 of them and you only have to thread it into the oil drain hole once and an oil change is easy and clean to do. Just remove the end cap on the hose and drain the oil into a container.

Now if someone could find a cheap threaded fitting for only a couple of dollars or so to extend it past the snowblowers body then you would have a winner. Until then the Drainzit wins.
 

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"Now if someone could find a cheap threaded fitting for only a couple of dollars or so to extend it past the snowblowers body then you would have a winner. Until then the Drainzit wins." [/QUOTE]

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I thought I would fuss with the idea a bit and made these up this morning. I used 5/8" 6061 Aluminum hex bar stock. They have the M10 x 1.25 thread on one end, and in this case, a 1/4 NTP thread in the other. The through hole is .250 . That is a large as I dared to go, with the M10 thread.-- John

 
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