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Good afternoon gang. I was cleaning my garage and moving my blower around today. I noticed on the gas tank that the dealer placed a sticker that states to us 91octane, non ethanol fuel only.

I use non ethanol 87 octane, not 91. Is this just a suggestion or does the manufacturer recommend this? I can't find it in the book anywhere. I will need to either empty the tank or buy an octane booster.

Thanks in advance!
 

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:iagree: I can't say I know what the manufacturer recommends but until you get into a high performance engine (turbocharged, Supercharged, high compression) there isn't a need for the higher octane. It might be in that area non ethanol is only available in the higher octane ? 91 won't hurt, there just isn't any benefit on a stock small engine.

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FWIW …. I have never used non ethanol, but I have always used Stabil and half the rate of Seafoam in all my 5 gal. cans as soon as I fill them. Never had a gas issue in all my years, and I never run them out after each use.

I have found it always beneficial to periodically run all my equipment, even out of season stuff. I never feel it iis good to let a piece of equipment or car to just sit idle for any great length of time.


JMHO
 

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Non-ethanol is good, if available. But I'm skeptical of the 91 octane requirement. I'd check your owner's manual, I'd expect that it will show that 87 is OK. Like K4aF said, 91 octane is typically required for high-compression engines, but snowblower engines usually don't fall into that category.
 

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I'd rather pay the small premium for non-ethanol gas(which is readily available in my area) then buy gas with ethanol and rely on extra cost additives to offset the negative effects of ethanol laced gas.
 

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:iagree: It's not that you don't want to run 91 it's that you WANT to run whatever is non-ethanol whenever possible.

Even with non-ethanol, like oneacer I add some sta-bil (measured that is) and some Lucas FI cleaner to each 5 gal can. I just have too many machines to keep track. I always try to run them dry before storage but .......
The sta-bil and Lucas are cheap insurance IMHO.

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd rather pay the small premium for non-ethanol gas(which is readily available in my area) then buy gas with ethanol and rely on extra cost additives to offset the negative effects of ethanol laced gas.
I agree. If you re read my post I was referring to the benefit of 91 octane over 87, both of which would be non ethanol. I understand the benefit of non ethanol, and use it in all my machines. Also, I still use Seafoam and Stabil. I have never had any issues but was a little thrown off by the 91 Octane requirement.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I agree, always non ethanol for me in every machine, everytime. It's easy to get around here. However, there is only one station in the area that I know of with higher octane, non ethanol stuff.
 

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In Ontario Canada you can get ethanol free gas in 91 octane at all gas stations. The 91 octane is usually better because it includes more cleaners and ethanol has less btu's. Ethanol free gas lasts for years without degrading enough to affect performance of small engine. No stabilizers or any other stuff required, just use up the fuel over time.

Ethanol gas at 5% seemed OK in Canada, but when the ratio was increased to 10% we had major problems that fuel stabilizers could not correct so most here switched to ethanol free and the 91 octane came along for the ride. No counting of days of use or adding stabilizers. The extra cost is noticeable. But compared to trying to start a snowblower at minus 30 C and colder to find globules of water absorbed into the ethanol that will not burn is full redemption.

Sounds like the dealer for the OP is used to cold weather issues with ethanol. If winter means -30 C temperatures then he deserves to be listened to.
 

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Personally, I typically run higher octane 90+ in lawn equipment or anything that doesn't go through fuel quickly. Most of those engines don't need the higher octane under normal operating conditions, but fuel does lose octane as it sits. And it's not uncommon for me to end up running 6 month old (stabilized) fuel, so I figure starting with higher octane is cheap insurance.

Keep in mind, between the lawnmower and snowblower, I rarely go through more than 10 gallons in a year. And I store equipment with a full tank during the off season, so for the snowblower, when I fire it up in November, that's fuel that's been in there since April and was probably purchased in February.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all of the replies. I'll stick with my 87 non ethanol and not worry about it. It's down the road and only about $0.30 more a gallon and good insurance. Happy New Year!
 

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I still maintain it is a complete waste of time to even worry about it. How many of you ran stabilizers etc and then stopped? I used to be religious about stabil etc but haven;t bothered with it for a really long time now. I buy gas with ethanol, have for decades. I have never had a problem with ethanol fuel, never. I store things seasonally with no treatment what so ever and thus for zero ill effects. So seek out and pay for these gimmicks, they might make you "feel" better but they are not doing anything tangible to benefit your engine.
 

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I agree, always non ethanol for me in every machine, everytime. It's easy to get around here. However, there is only one station in the area that I know of with higher octane, non ethanol stuff.
I’m just curious, because I have never seen a pump with non ethanol gas, how much does it cost per gallon? The nearest station to me is a Sunoco that’s about 15 miles away. Currently, in my area, 87 octane is around $2.59 and 93 is $3.09
 

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a friend

Good afternoon gang. I was cleaning my garage and moving my blower around today. I noticed on the gas tank that the dealer placed a sticker that states to us 91octane, non ethanol fuel only.

I use non ethanol 87 octane, not 91. Is this just a suggestion or does the manufacturer recommend this? I can't find it in the book anywhere. I will need to either empty the tank or buy an octane booster.

Thanks in advance!
According to my friend who runs a gas station you should (in Norway) use the high octane gasoline since it is a better fuel and the engine starts easier as well.
I will start doing this after I refill next time.

Dag
 

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According to my friend who runs a gas station you should (in Norway) use the high octane gasoline since it is a better fuel and the engine starts easier as well.
I will start doing this after I refill next time.

Dag
I would be concerned about having friends like that! ALL gasoline in the US for sure is loaded with detergents and additives. You do get more additives to raise the octane number in the "premium" grade fuels. The problem is, the higher the octane rating, the more resistant to ignition the fuel is. This can actually rob a low compression engine with conservative ignition timing and low operating speed of power. The only one benefiting in that scenario is the guy who owns the gas station selling you a higher priced product...

The power loss will be more pronounced with higher altitude as well. We had older snowmobiles that ran substantially better on 85 than the 91 recommended for the newer, higher compression models.
 

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gas

I would be concerned about having friends like that! ALL gasoline in the US for sure is loaded with detergents and additives. You do get more additives to raise the octane number in the "premium" grade fuels. The problem is, the higher the octane rating, the more resistant to ignition the fuel is. This can actually rob a low compression engine with conservative ignition timing and low operating speed of power. The only one benefiting in that scenario is the guy who owns the gas station selling you a higher priced product...

The power loss will be more pronounced with higher altitude as well. We had older snowmobiles that ran substantially better on 85 than the 91 recommended for the newer, higher compression models.
Thanks for the input Brent.

He will not sell me any gas so that is not his goal:wink2:
But what he says is that the 95 octane sold in Norway are ****, and he 98 octane will be better for my machine. But I can and will reconsider after what you just said. So far I always used 85 (what you call 85 I guess)

Dag
 

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I would be concerned about having friends like that! ALL gasoline in the US for sure is loaded with detergents and additives. You do get more additives to raise the octane number in the "premium" grade fuels. The problem is, the higher the octane rating, the more resistant to ignition the fuel is. This can actually rob a low compression engine with conservative ignition timing and low operating speed of power. The only one benefiting in that scenario is the guy who owns the gas station selling you a higher priced product...



The power loss will be more pronounced with higher altitude as well. We had older snowmobiles that ran substantially better on 85 than the 91 recommended for the newer, higher compression models.


I agree completely. I have had a Honda lawn mower bought new 9 years ago. The first couple years,when new, it ran horribly. Rough, surging and fouled the plugs. This was when I was using 91 premium gas.

I changed out the plug, added 87 octane to the tank (did nothing to the carb) and it’s ran terrifically for the 6-7 years since.

High octane is not always best for these small engines.
 
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