Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

New member here! I just picked up a Tecumseh powered Ariens 7-24 - the model number (910008) suggests it was from the 1973 batch. I am in the process of installing a new carb and muffler.

The muffler stud that passes through the center of the muffler was already broken so the old muffler was only hanging by 1 good bolt anyways. I carefully ground the old muffler away without damaging the block
. With the muffler removed I tried heating the 2 bolts red - but they would not come free. I didn't dare turning any harder for fear of snapping them. What would you guys suggest for extracting the remains of these 2 muffler bolts/studs.

Added a photo of the dilemma:
http://imgur.com/a/TCvB6

I presume my 2 choices would be to heat the block around the stuck bolts or drilling but I'd be happy to hear from your experience!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Hi everyone,

New member here! I just picked up a Tecumseh powered Ariens 7-24 - the model number (910008) suggests it was from the 1973 batch. I am in the process of installing a new carb and muffler.

The muffler stud that passes through the center of the muffler was already broken so the old muffler was only hanging by 1 good bolt anyways. I carefully ground the old muffler away without damaging the block
. With the muffler removed I tried heating the 2 bolts red - but they would not come free. I didn't dare turning any harder for fear of snapping them. What would you guys suggest for extracting the remains of these 2 muffler bolts/studs.

I presume my 2 choices would be to heat the block around the stuck bolts or drilling but I'd be happy to hear from your experience!
Can you get pliers on the broken bolt?

First thing would be to spray some penetrating oil on them every day and try loosening them again. If still stuck after a few days, I would warm the motor up and try it hot. If you do this, you must have a way to block ambient temperature air from entering the head and warping the valve. Masking tape, or a refrigerator magnet may work. You can also try putting a good amount of torque on them while you smack the end of the bolt with a hammer

If those methods don't work, Id just crank on them. They will either come out or break. Then either jump with joy, or sharpen your center punch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,452 Posts
Weld a nut on each stud (if you have access to a welder), spray penetrating spray several times, tap the head of the stud (careful no to hit it to hard to damage the threads on the block), then try lo loosen or tighten the stud. Once it gets loose, spray more penetrating fluid and work it back and forth until is out.
If it snaps off, then an extracting set will be your best friend. Or carefully drill the stud out and clean the threads (you want to be very precise here).
I have been lucky removing studs from aluminum cylinder heads by carefully heating around the studs and spraying penetrant on the hot area to cool it down instantly (this also works very well on seized augers).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,799 Posts
Weld a nut on each stud (if you have access to a welder), spray penetrating spray several times, tap the head of the stud (careful no to hit it to hard to damage the threads on the block), then try lo loosen or tighten the stud. Once it gets loose, spray more penetrating fluid and work it back and forth until is out.
If it snaps off, then an extracting set will be your best friend. Or carefully drill the stud out and clean the threads (you want to be very precise here).
I have been lucky removing studs from aluminum cylinder heads by carefully heating around the studs and spraying penetrant on the hot area to cool it down instantly (this also works very well on seized augers).
if you have to drill the bolt in the head , what do you use to clean the threads with? I have been afraid to drill too close to the threads and damage them and then that may leave too much of the stud remaining on the threads.

if i damaged the threads i had to re tap it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,452 Posts
if you have to drill the bolt in the head , what do you use to clean the threads with? I have been afraid to drill too close to the threads and damage them and then that may leave too much of the stud remaining on the threads.

if i damaged the threads i had to re tap it.
You try to drill as centered as possible (if you have left hand drill bits, it is best, some times it'll come out on its own as you drill), then use a pick to break and remove the remains of the threads and finally run a tap for final cleaning.
Some times I drill a hole in the center of the broken bolt/stud, then heat it and cool it and it has worked lose (I suspect the hole lets the material "compress" inwards), then I'm able to remove it with an extractor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Weld a nut on each stud (if you have access to a welder), spray penetrating spray several times, tap the head of the stud (careful no to hit it to hard to damage the threads on the block), then try lo loosen or tighten the stud. Once it gets loose, spray more penetrating fluid and work it back and forth until is out.
If it snaps off, then an extracting set will be your best friend. Or carefully drill the stud out and clean the threads (you want to be very precise here).
I have been lucky removing studs from aluminum cylinder heads by carefully heating around the studs and spraying penetrant on the hot area to cool it down instantly (this also works very well on seized augers).
Thanks for the advice guys!

I will try welding a nut onto each of the studs and applying penetrating oil. I'm not typically patient enough for penetrating oil - my first reflex is to go for the torch set.
In the mean time I will order some left-hand drill bits and an extraction set. According to the engine parts list the threading is 5/16-18.

Speaking of torching - is there any aluminum I would need to be aware if I'm torching in that general area?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
If you have the time and patience, try using the oil for a couple of days first. Just use a simple propane torch to heat it some and then spray it with PB Blaster after you've taken the torch away and waited 10-20 seconds for it to start to cool. The cooling process will help pull the penetrating oil into the threads. Spray it a couple of times while it's cooling.
When you have the bolt welded onto the stud that is a good time to get a wrench on it and try to back it out.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,811 Posts
My Ariens has a small hole in the muffler and I am dreading removing it, Already have a new muffler since last winter but dread doing it and I HAVE left handed drills and helicoils AND Taps if needed LOL. May have my buddy just patch weld the old one, Only a 1/4 inch hole but god I'm dreading snapping one of the bolts....
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top