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Discussion Starter #541
It occurs to me they might care more about freeing up the space if they just bought 7 new ones.
 

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could always see what they want for them as a lot and see if it is even worth your time to go check them out. heck being a business they might even just sell them to you dirt cheap just to get them gone and not have to deal with any headache. i would guess they can write them off as a business expense or somethings
I agree.they would have to be real cheap. i hate commercial machines. they are usually trashed by minimum wage operators. only good for parts and half of the machine goes to the dump. my back yard looks like one. my neighbor toldme that and i told him its still a free country ( for now ) and suggested he put up a fence.
 

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I've been buying, refurbishing and reselling 2-stage snowblowers since I retired about four years ago. I thought it might be fun to share and compare tips, lessons learned and processes with others who do the same thing.

I don't make much money doing this but it's been a great way to stay active once the hot summer months wind down. In the past I've completed 10- 14 units each season but I've gone completely overboard and now have 25 units I'll be selling this fall and winter. Here are some of my observations. Tell us about your experiences and I'd love to hear your feedback on my observations.

* I've narrowed my focus almost exclusively to 2-stage snowblowers. I've concentrated mostly on Ariens because parts are easily available and the build quality is typically above average. I can find the Operator's Manual, Parts Manuals and (sometimes) the Service Manual on Arien's web site. Limiting my focus has made my parts inventory more standardized and lowered the learning curve to making repairs. I avoid MTD and the other economy brands. At least in my part of the world, Ariens units are easy to find but Toros are far less common. Besides Ariens, I currently have 1 Snapper and 2 John Deere (Murray/Briggs), 2 old Gilsons and 1 Cub Cadet. Yes, I know Cub violates my "no MTD" rule but I couldn't resist this big old bruiser (1333SWE).

* Most of my units are 5- 25 years old as buyers don't seem to be interested in the much higher quality Ariens units from the "good old days". I love the older 924's but buyers don't. I'll never work on another "932" with the plastic wheel rims (what was Ariens thinking?) or a "926" that requires 4 factory modifications (double drive belts, drive pulley travel limit, sealing plate and chute). Granted, the 926 is a decent machine with the mods but making those mods eliminates almost any margin for profit.

* I've developed a 35 point "checklist" of tasks I do for each unit. Since I usually have 2 - 4 machines in some stage of refurbishment, the checklist helps me remember what I've done and what's remaining.

* I use an old IBM laptop running Windows 10 to store all of the manuals and reference materials. I don't have reliable Internet access in my barn and I was weary of printing everything.

* The vast majority of my machines have carb problems. I now have a "one attempt" policy for cleaning an original carb before a $10 Chinese carb is installed. I disassemble the original carb, use carb cleaner, torch tips for the orifices and compressed air. Then it goes in my Harbor Freight ultrasonic cleaner for 3 heat cycles. If that doesn't do the trick, I'm not wasting any more time messing around with it.

* Speaking of Harbor Freight, their 1000 pound lift table is an absolute must-have. I've made some modifications to my table and I'll include some photos later if anybody is interested. Getting a machine up to eye level has made this so much easier that I just couldn't live without it now.

* Aside from replacement carbs, I try to buy Ariens / Stens original equipment parts when possible. I buy common things like spark plugs and fuel lines in bulk. I buy a lot of parts from Jacks and eBay. I prefer Jacks when I have a large order and eBay when I need one or two things quickly. I'd like to find other good parts sources aside from Jacks and eBay but haven't taken the time to research the alternatives.

I have much more but I'll stop here since I'm not sure if this thread will be terribly useful to many readers. I'll add more if there's demand.

Carburetors! OK, I agree some should be replaced but there are no working parts in those beasts to wear out. My first line of attack is to pull the carb's cup to gain access to the main valve. I recommend torch cleaners to ram into the valve and purge the poop out. My approach is to clamp an end of #18 bare copper wire into my vice, wrap the extended end around a pipe, stick or whatever I can get my hands on and pull. I find stretching the wire I can make my own ''torch cleaner'' to accommodate those main valves I have come across. And what a difference that makes! Engines that would not start for the most part start on the first pull.

That is one heck of job reducer over ordering and installing a new carb which sometimes is a PITA. But to each his own.
 

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3 inches of snow last night and nothing to sell. I did rush service a blower yesterday that was on the back burner and sold it within a hour. also gave away a nice old Honda 50 yesterday to a very nice family. That was actually a nicer feeling than selling the other Honda at a good price.
 

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Discussion Starter #545
I delivered three machines this weekend. Two were for family members and one sale so just two remaining to sell. I declined two free walk-behind mowers yesterday....it's nice freeing up space in the barn and I already have enough winter projects. I think I'll start maintenance on my own snow fighting gear this week.
 

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I delivered three machines this weekend. Two were for family members and one sale so just two remaining to sell. I declined two free walk-behind mowers yesterday....it's nice freeing up space in the barn and I already have enough winter projects. I think I'll start maintenance on my own snow fighting gear this week.
That's funny. I still need to service my old Honda HS80 and start check 2 of my single stages. another 520 and a 621.
Isnt that usually the case? Your own equipment get neglected. I did do pre winter checks on my 3 vehicles though about a month ago.

Check them over pretty good.new wipers , fluids ready . CB radios working.Extra food/water in cooler/blanket , shovel, first aid kit , fire extingusher and more. A lot of stuff I carry for other people for emergencies.

Old Boy Scout habits nver go away.
 

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Discussion Starter #548
Rod330- I’m just east of you in Peninsula. See your machines all of the time. Nice work.
Thank you, I appreciate your kind words! It's been a great way to keep myself busy this year with the pandemic.
 

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went to the honda dealer today. both area dealers have NO 2 stage Honda's in stock. busy busy trying to get a couple good used units done to sell. will go top dollar no problem.
 

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Carburetors! OK, I agree some should be replaced but there are no working parts in those beasts to wear out. My first line of attack is to pull the carb's cup to gain access to the main valve. I recommend torch cleaners to ram into the valve and purge the poop out. My approach is to clamp an end of #18 bare copper wire into my vice, wrap the extended end around a pipe, stick or whatever I can get my hands on and pull. I find stretching the wire I can make my own ''torch cleaner'' to accommodate those main valves I have come across. And what a difference that makes! Engines that would not start for the most part start on the first pull.

That is one heck of job reducer over ordering and installing a new carb which sometimes is a PITA. But to each his own.
any chance you play or know someone who plays guitars? old strings make real good carb cleaners .
 

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any chance you play or know someone who plays guitars? old strings make real good carb cleaners .
I have an ultrasonic cleaner and a small brush/cleaner set I got when I ordered a "knock off carb", but my favorite "go to" for cleaning carb jets is a piece of wire I found holding a tag to a junk snow blower I picked up. It fits most jets (Tecumseh, Honda and Briggs) and is long enough I haven't lost it yet.
Foggysail, your so correct about the "poop" in these carbs.
All that said, how many are having issues getting Carb rebuild kits right now?
 

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I have an ultrasonic cleaner and a small brush/cleaner set I got when I ordered a "knock off carb", but my favorite "go to" for cleaning carb jets is a piece of wire I found holding a tag to a junk snow blower I picked up. It fits most jets (Tecumseh, Honda and Briggs) and is long enough I haven't lost it yet.
Foggysail, your so correct about the "poop" in these carbs.
All that said, how many are having issues getting Carb rebuild kits right now?
most places are slow now. 3-4 weeks or more if they have the parts. plus prices are higher
 

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Discussion Starter #555
On the topic of tools for resellers, I snagged this little Milwaukee tire inflator a few days ago from Home Depot's Black Friday sale (link below). I've been skeptical of them but decided to give it a try- and I'm positively thrilled with it. Just two days later my wife called to say one of her delivery vans had a flat. It wasn't just low- it had no air pressure whatsoever. She's got a pancake compressor at the shop but I decided to give this a whirl. In less than 5 minutes that Ford Transit tire went from zero to 42 pounds and I was off to the local tire store. All you have to do is set the desired pressure and walk away. In addition to our cars, it will be very convenient for my snowblowers, garden tractors, etc. I was so impressed I bought one for our son and son-in-law as Christmas presents.
Considering how powerful and reliable my battery tools have become, I may sell off my barn air compressor in the spring.

Inflator.jpg


 

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considering the voltage you would almost think they would include a cigarette lighter cord for it also so you could run it off 12v or charge the battery while on the go. i usually use just a standard 12v inflator that plugs into the lighter port when not at home. i have been pretty happy with the current one that i bought about 1 year ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #557
considering the voltage you would almost think they would include a cigarette lighter cord for it also so you could run it off 12v or charge the battery while on the go. i usually use just a standard 12v inflator that plugs into the lighter port when not at home. i have been pretty happy with the current one that i bought about 1 year ago.
I like the idea of having a 12v adapter to charge the M12 battery- maybe the next version will have that. I've owned a couple of little 12v inflators that were pure junk but I'm sure there are good ones too. In the meantime, I really like the idea of taking this anywhere in the field or my barn without depending on 12v or AC power.
 

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when i use to do landscaping we use to have Milwaukee radio that would run off the battery when not plugged in and would charge them when plugged in. it was definitely nice to have multiple power options. most of the time i am withing reach of a 12v lighter port or if not i usually have my boost pack which is pretty portable. not quite as small as that but does the job pretty good and is pretty cheap.
 

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Just wondering, how large a power inverter (seems so many carry them now) would be needed to run this.
Did some quick "Google" research and this seems to be a top of the line tool, but lacking the plug in option.
And of course, Milwaukee seems to be a 110 AC charging system.
 

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Discussion Starter #560
Just wondering, how large a power inverter (seems so many carry them now) would be needed to run this.
Did some quick "Google" research and this seems to be a top of the line tool, but lacking the plug in option.
And of course, Milwaukee seems to be a 110 AC charging system.
For what it's worth, this guy is easily charging 3 Milwaukee M12 batteries with a cheap 200w inverter.
 
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