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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - could someone point me to where I can find the resistance specs for a 34443D CDI solid state ignition module? It is for an Ariens 524 (Model 932036) with Tecumseh HSSK50 engine (spec: 67416U). I suspect mine is bad, but I'd like to test it before ordering a new one. I have checked all the documentation I could find (Ariens owner's manual, parts manual, repair manual, service manual and Tecumseh technician's handbook), but don't see the specs listed in any of them. I've been looking on the internet, including here, but so far no luck.

Also, can I test the coil while still attached, or do I have to physically remove it to get correct readings?
 

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+1 on the coil, but I would first remove the ground wire from the coil and check for a spark. It is possible that the grounding wire is bared and grounding out somewhere other than the designated engine stop connection. Also check that you have a proper gap from coil to pickup and surfaces are clean, sometimes it can get reduced due to corrosion, etc.

Just a thought to be thorough.
 

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Yes, thanks for the link. I know these aren't expensive (at least the ones from 3rd parties)...I've already looked. Well, I'm a bit on the fence about this, because I have a spark sometimes, which is why I wanted to see if I could test it first. I'm not sure if a bad coil could also mean a "sometimes spark" condition. I'm assuming an ignition coil could only be working intermittently if it's going bad, so that it doesn't need to be either always a spark or no spark ever, but am not 100% sure about this. Can anyone confirm?
 

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I'm assuming an ignition coil could only be working intermittently if it's going bad, so that it doesn't need to be either always a spark or no spark ever, but am not 100% sure about this. Can anyone confirm?
Snowman,

For sure, any solid state circuitry can become intermittent for some indefinite period of time, until it outright "gives up the ghost" entirely. This is particularly true of circuits that are subjected to extremes of temperature change. When your snowblower is sitting outside in the winter, that module is pretty darn cold. After the engine is running for a while it will naturally heat up. On many types of power equipment, the module is located adjacent to the flywheel, not only to generate a voltage from the rotating magnets, but also so that it can benefit from the air stream produced, to prevent it from overheating.


I have a machine right now that fires right up on the first pull all the time. Will run like a champ until I stop it or it runs out of gas. If you immediately start it back up again-- no problem, but if you wait until after it has been shut down for maybe five minutes, it will refuse to start back up.

Now, why would this be? :smiley-confused013:

Well, what has happened is, the cooling effect from the flywheel is obviously no longer there, but the module is attached to the frame of a very hot engine. The heat migrates its way back to the flakey module and causes a failure. Allowing it to cool for an hour or so, and it fires right back up on the first pull.

So can a failing module act in an intermittent fashion?
He11 yeah.....:wink2:

Jack's right......grab another one. If it turns out to be a grounding or other wiring issue which may take you more time to troubleshoot, then worse case is you have an extra module that set you back less than 15 bucks. :grin:
.
 
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