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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've posted a few questions recently about paint and parts for my HS828. So now comes one about dealing with the rusted impeller housing, chute, and auger housing. Over the years, if you blow the EOD ice and snow thrown into your drive by your municipalities snow plows, the salt will attack the steel and rust and pit the metal.

What techniques have you guys found to be successful in bringing the machine back to life?

Is sanding the old rust off enough? I can try Locktite's Extend and then paint on top of that. Or, have you tried filling the pits with bondo and the sanding it smooth before you paint.

I happen to have some Ospho rust remover from a motorcycle restoration. I'll use that first after some sanding, and then paint. However, any way I slice it, this is going to require a lot of elbow grease - there is simply no way to take power sanding tools to the many nooks and crannies of the machine (even with the various parts stripped down on my work bench).
 

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What timing, There was a post earlier today about using a produtct called POR-15 for restoring rusty steel. That is what I would recommend if you are planning to keep it for a while. You can read about it on their website. You do not need to buy the metal prep product they recommend. Just remove the loose mateial, clean and dry it and you can paint over the rust. If you have small holes I have used epoxy like Quick Steel or JB Weld to patch them and build up thinning material.. By small I am talking about under .25"..
 

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What I did was take rust off with electric grinder with a flap disc and air powered die grinder with small wire wheels. Then sanded and prepped metal with a degreaser like acetone or mineral spirits. Apply a good self etching or red oxide primer, then paint.

You are right, it takes some elbow grease and is a very dirty job, but necessary for a long lasting paint job.

How far you want to go with the metal finishing is up to you, keep in mind it is a snow blower not a classic car. Most important is to remove as much rust as possible, degrease the metal thoroughly and use a good primer.

The POR-15 product mentioned above sounds like a great way to save time and save yourself from the mess.

Some Photos of my 52 year old Ariens I restored this spring:

Amber Orange Colorfulness Paint Tile
Propeller Teal Machine Plastic
Rectangle Tan
Red Plastic Automotive lighting Composite material Toilet
Red Carmine Plastic Coquelicot Boot
 

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never use bondo on a snowblower especially just for pitted spots. you would be better off just using a high build primer if you want to try hiding some of the pitting and make things look smoother. it is just a snowblower after all so i wouldn't go too overboard. if you do plan on keeping the machine it might be worth looking into getting it sandblasted and powder coated. powder coating will definitely cost more but will also usually last a bit better than paint.
 

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I use rust reformer (after some scraping and sanding) then paint. You could also use a Zinc-rich paint as a base before top-coat.
 
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I am in the same camp as Ziggy, just clean it up, primer and paint.

If money is of no object, then have it sand blasted and powder coated for sure, but as others have stated, its not going to be at the Pebble Beach Concours D’Elegance.

Here are just a couple circa 60,s that I brought back from a rusted mess.

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173490

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173492
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all.
@Toro-8-2-4 - I know about POR and have used it. Many years ago I ground the rust off the bottom of my work truck, painted their primer on, and sprayed the topcoat on that. The instructions were frightening, and I put a heavy duty plastic bag over my head with a hose that led to the discharge of my wife's vacuum cleaner for positive pressure air. A complete set of disposable tyvek overalls completed my garb. The setup worked fine, but I thought the stuff was too messy to use. Back then, they wanted you to fully immerse the metal in a bath of their prep solution (phosphoric acid(?)). Great idea if you have bags of money and industrial facilities.

@Ziggy65 - Duh, how dumb can I be? I have a die grinder and 2" discs. I will have to look for flap wheels. Can you recommend a 'self etching red primer'? I remember when I could buy zinc chromate primer in spray cans but I have not seen it in years. After reading a review of paints that showed Rustoleum was no better at preventing rust than any other oil (enamel) paint, I gave up on that. However, that brand and Krylon have taken over the spray paint market.

@crazzywolfie - I like the sandblasting idea, but that will have to wait until summer. I did wonder about bondo. I know its supposed to be applied over clean, primed metal, and not over rusted pits.

@tpenfield - Can you suggest a 'zinc rich primer'? See my comment above to Ziggy. Years ago, primers were advertised as being 'self etching' or 'zinc chromate', but I have not seen that lately. Must have gone out with mercury, lead, and asbestos - all words that strike fear in the hearts of moms everywhere.

@oneacer - Nice looking work. What do you mean it's not going to the Pebble Beach Show? I might win best snowblower in show award if I were to take it there. (A cinch since it would be the ONLY snowblower there).
 

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I've posted a few questions recently about paint and parts for my HS828. So now comes one about dealing with the rusted impeller housing, chute, and auger housing. Over the years, if you blow the EOD ice and snow thrown into your drive by your municipalities snow plows, the salt will attack the steel and rust and pit the metal.

What techniques have you guys found to be successful in bringing the machine back to life?

Is sanding the old rust off enough? I can try Locktite's Extend and then paint on top of that. Or, have you tried filling the pits with bondo and the sanding it smooth before you paint.

I happen to have some Ospho rust remover from a motorcycle restoration. I'll use that first after some sanding, and then paint. However, any way I slice it, this is going to require a lot of elbow grease - there is simply no way to take power sanding tools to the many nooks and crannies of the machine (even with the various parts stripped down on my work bench).

Sure, you described a common problem that I was determined to avoid with my almost new Ariens 28 Pro. My solution is to wash the entire machine using my garden hose after every storm. I know most guys cannot do this because few leave their outside hoses and valves filled with water during winters.

My solution is not for everyone. What I did was valve off the outside faucet using a valve in my basement. Coupled to the pipe going outside is another valve that I attach my Ingersoll-Rand T30 air compressor to. After washing I shut the water basement valve, connect my air pressure hose to the other valve and purge the pipe feeding the hose along with the outside faucet and garden hose.

My machine is only a few years old, although still looking new too early to brag how well my procedure works to prevent rust.
 

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Wrenchit. I am glad you know about POR-15. It is tough to get off of your skin. I should have mentioned it is for spot painting. Only used over the rusted metal areas as it does not adhere well to bare metal or painted surface. It is more work and is t is a bit expensive. I like the recommendations from Ziggy. I have also used Rustoleum Rusty metal primer on rusted steel instead of the POR-15 with decent results. I dont know if it is a red oxide primer but it is the same color as what is shown above. Much faster, easier and cheaper but not as robust of a finish as the Por-15 route. It all depends on what your end goal may be.

I have used an Enamel top coat from Krylon. I like the results and they have some Reds that match well enough to Snapper and Toro. Plus it can be applied down as low as 40 degrees F which has been a plus for me.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sure, you described a common problem that I was determined to avoid with my almost new Ariens 28 Pro. My solution is to wash the entire machine using my garden hose after every storm. I know most guys cannot do this because few leave their outside hoses and valves filled with water during winters.

My solution is not for everyone. What I did was valve off the outside faucet using a valve in my basement. Coupled to the pipe going outside is another valve that I attach my Ingersoll-Rand T30 air compressor to. After washing I shut the water basement valve, connect my air pressure hose to the other valve and purge the pipe feeding the hose along with the outside faucet and garden hose.

My machine is only a few years old, although still looking new too early to brag how well my procedure works to prevent rust.
Not a bad solution, but fyi, plumbing supply houses (maybe even Hopot) sell frost free sill cocks. This is an outside faucet with a copper pipe soldered to the valve. They come in even sized lengths - 6, 8, 10, 12" long, and a shaft runs thru the pipe from the handle to the valve seat at the end of the pipe. When installed and screwed to the outside of the house, that copper pipe is slanted upward as it goes inside. If you turn off the water from the outside, that section of pipe will drain the water out until it is empty. Since the valve seat and last point of water filled pipe is inside the heated house, no freezing problem. It is important, however, not to leave a hose attached in freezing weather. The hose can trap water in the pipe which might freeze. Note that some of these come with a plastic wedge that goes between the house and the flange to tilt that pipe upward, and others have the flange cast with an integral wedge.

I saw somewhere that you can order custom lengths for different construction situations.

Here is a picture of one. This is a Link to a website with good info, though I do not agree with their ratings. For me, the best sill cock is one from a company that makes and sells repair parts - and both the device and parts are stocked by my local plumbing supply house. A plumber once told me Woodford is an excellent brand - made of red brass and parts are avalable. Like most other valves today, quarter turn models are available. Another link.

173504
 

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Anyone in cold climate should have the frost free spigots ... as mentioned, you want them at minimum to be going at least 6-12 inches into the cellar area from the interior sill plate.

Also you have to make sure any hose is removed or it will surely freeze.
 

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Personally when cleaning up an auger housing i start with knocking off excess rust with a wire brush. Next is to abrasive blast it with ground cinders (don't use sand). After that then use a rust encapsulation product from Eastwood, finally a good coat of Rustoleum paint. Also insure the bearings or bushings are good so the auger doesn't rattle around. That's what I did with the Searsasaurus and it's still holding solid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Personally when cleaning up an auger housing i start with knocking off excess rust with a wire brush. Next is to abrasive blast it with ground cinders (don't use sand). After that then use a rust encapsulation product from Eastwood, finally a good coat of Rustoleum paint. Also insure the bearings or bushings are good so the auger doesn't rattle around. That's what I did with the Searsasaurus and it's still holding solid.
You made a post in 2013 that I just found myself on after reading your #13 post above. In that earlier post you talked about Imron paint - a high tech (then) polyurethane paint that was widely used on aircraft and boats. It required positive pressure respirators - the fumes were deadly - and a fair amount of practice to get a good coat the first time. Rustoleum does not hold a candle to the quality or durability of Imron, however, it costs a very small fraction of what the poly paint sold for.

I'm not set up for sand blasting so I'm using a die grinder (aka body grinder) and the Ospho I mentioned earlier. It seems to be doing the job so far.
 

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To echo what others have stated, used a hand held grinder, the Rustoleum primer above, and Rustoleum engine black/orange paint for the engine/tractor/bucket, then Rustoleum appliance white paint for the handlebars - all of this two years ago to a VERY rusty machine. I laid the primer and paint on fairly thick, let everything bake in the HOT summer sun a few days before re-assembling. Then I didn't use the machine until 4 months later so I knew it was as dry/hardened as I could do it (on the cheap anyway).

No rust since (I didn't do the rakes).


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I used an epoxy primer and 2k paint/clear-coat when I restored my parent's neglected snow-thrower. I used an angle grinder with sanding discs and hand sanded all rust. I also sanded the good paint to accept the primer better. It has held up rear well so far, but chunks of ice, rocks and other debris are going to damage the paint no matter what. The key is to buy touch-up paint and cover scratches before they start to rust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Is sanding the old rust off enough? I can try Locktite's Extend and then paint on top of that. Or, have you tried filling the pits with bondo and the sanding it smooth before you paint.
I asked the same question about a week ago and was told bondo has no place on a snowblower. I should qualify that - I was talking about inside the blower housing (behind the auger). If you are talking about a concours restoration and the old machine will hold a place of honor in your living room, then of course, use bondo. IIRC, they used to wipe (molten) lead on those old Rolls then grind it smooth. I suppose that is always an option, but your longevity will suffer if you don't wear appropriate PPE. The lead will certainly hold on better than bondo.
 

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if your going to just paint it you can use high build primer to hide some of the pitting. its not worth the effort to fill the pitting with lead substitute. high build primer goes on thick and you sand it smooth so it should hopefully fill in most pitting.
 
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