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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone mess around with salt dissolving sprays for cleaning cars, plows, and snowblowers?

There are commercially available concentrates such as salt-a-way, salt-x, salt-off.

And the homemade variants

Vinegar, little car soap, and water in a spray bottle.
Baking soda, little car soap, water " " "
 

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To be honest, I didn't even know these were a thing :) How are they different/better than just water?

If I was trying to get off salt at the end of the season, I'd probably just spray it with a hose, but I've never given it a lot of thought.
 

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Looks like they are mostly water, with a bit of corrosion inhibitor and "buffering agents" added. The SDS for Salt-X shows the pH as 5.06, which is a little acidic, but not that bad.

It it were me, I'd still use water for a rinse, if possible, then a bit of WD-40 for keeping rust at bay until a thorough cleaning/lubing/rust protecting in the spring.
 

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I just hose mine off and use this stuff on them, seems to work well and doesn't hurt paint or plastic.
I also use fluid film on my blowers / mower decks and hedge trimmer blades. I buy in bulk by the gallon and apply with an undercoat gun.
 

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I use Salt-Away on my outboard boat motors . . . It dissolves salt and minerals very well. A bit pricey to be using on a snow blower though. Not sure it is really needed, given the relatively low concentration of salt that might remain on a snow blower after its use.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Fluid film has been talk a lot about, I'm going to have to try it out. I've noticed quite a bit of surface corrosion and a salty film on my Honda aluminum components. I've owned it for two years and have never gave it a good wash or sprayed any rust inhibitor. My plan is to give it a good cleaning before I put it into storage.
 

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Yeah, for snowblower use, IMO these kinds of products are a solution without a problem..
I do live in a "heavy salt use" area..in the winter, our roads are often bright white with salt residue..
but I always do three things with the snowblower to minimize salt impact:

1. Always clear EOD first, because that is the snow that contains all the salt, then after that is done do the rest of the driveway which is "clean" snow, straight from the sky..that clears out all the salty snow.

2. Always brush off the excess snow when i'm done using the snowblower.

3. Rinse down thoroughly with a hose in the spring..there will be no salt left at that point.

I see no need for any of those products..

Scot
 

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Yeah, for snowblower use, IMO these kinds of products are a solution without a problem..
I do live in a "heavy salt use" area..in the winter, our roads are often bright white with salt residue..
but I always do three things with the snowblower to minimize salt impact:

1. Always clear EOD first, because that is the snow that contains all the salt, then after that is done do the rest of the driveway which is "clean" snow, straight from the sky..that clears out all the salty snow.

2. Always brush off the excess snow when i'm done using the snowblower.

3. Rinse down thoroughly with a hose in the spring..there will be no salt left at that point.

I see no need for any of those products..

Scot
WD40 is basically the same thing and will work well. I disagree straight water will not remove salt and the other chemicals they use on the roads now. If you hose your car down with a hose without using soap, you still see the salt left over. So what I do is hit my machine with wd40 liberally everywhere after use. That pretty well covers it. Plus waiting all the way until spring too hose it off is a bad idea, it gives the salt a lot of time to eat away at the corrosive metal. Its best to hit the machine with wd40 the next day. I waited a week one time and I could see the rust already building. Salt and those chemicals they put down on the road are the worst thing for under-bodies of cars, snowblowers, any machine made of metal and metal itself. It has to be hit with that stuff right away or it will start rusting and corroding fast and you definitely need more than just water. If you going too use water, I would spray it down with purple power first then hit it with the hose. I would still spray it with wd40 or an anti rust lubricant after for sure, especially the auger and the belly, thats where the rust builds and sits the worst, in the bucket, basically you want everything lubricated with the anti rust, especially all areas that don't have paint, nuts bolts, in and on the chute, the worm gear and gears, all the bolts, the chrome lined handle bars, muffler and engine component's the rims, tire chains need it for sure, I'm sure I missed many spots, basically anything you see that can be rusted up, you want to spray down with wd40. The 20 oz can of wd40 for 8 bucks will save you hundreds of dollars or more down the road, as you are saving the machine from rotting away. Especially the newer thin made metal machines, but even the old solid thick metal machine's need it. WD40 is your best friend in this situation.
 
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