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I own a 10-year old Ariens 920 Series Sno-Thro, Model 920014 - Compact 24 LE. My nephew is interested in buying it and I'm looking to see if anyone has an idea of a reasonable price. I've never had any problems with it and have only replaced to skid plates. It's plug-in electric start and runs great with no issues at all. Any suggestions on a reasonable price? Not looking to make a bunch, but also don't want to give it away either. Thanks and take care!
 

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$150-300 sounds about right. It depends on how much you used it. In my area, the average snowfall is 18 inches a year so a 10 yr. old snowblower would be in very good shape.

I agree that selling to family can be dicey.
 

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If you are in a position to give it to him, just do that. I never sell mechanical things to family or friends, I usually just give them to them (this does not occur often).

If you wanted to sell it outright to a stranger, I would start at maybe $250, especially if it is in good shape. You can always come down a little. Just look on facebook marketplace, that will give you a good idea of average prices. Don't forget, we are coming into winter soon, the prices will hold firm, or maybe even go up.
 

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I agree with carguy20 above in that I never sell [or give for free] anything mechanical [blower, mower, tiller, car, etc.] to any friends or family, any issue with the machine will be your fault. Even the nicest cousin will not be the nicest cousin when they blow a belt and call you in the middle of a storm because the machine is broken and it's your fault, this is from direct experience, though in this case I did give it to them for free, so my response was "that is why it was free." Golden rule, NEVER give/sell anything mechanical to a friend or family member.
I am a construction Project Manager and I do not do any construction/renovation work for family or friends, it is a rule I put in place very early on in my career. I will help them as a laborer or carpenter, maybe give some advise on scope and pricing, but nothing beyond that because I get the same thing [from the two projects I did for friends/family long ago].
Just my 2 cents, maybe your family/friends are different.
 

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Sometimes even when you give things to strangers you hear from them. Although in a minority.

Have been giving away snowblowers away for free for the last 5 years. Most are rescued from landfill and it's a miracle i can get them running and working. I make sure the person knows this when they accept it.
had one guy come 50 miles for one and a couple years later he emails me that the blower had a gas line split. wanted me to fix. I said sure , bring it to me . was gonna fix for free. he asks if i could pick it up or come to his house to repair.........no money , some sob story.....

shaking my head.....you cant make this stuff up
 

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People I have given stuff to usually know that it has no guarantees. I did my best getting it together, and I tell them it will probably not last 10 or 20 years without more maintenance / repairs. They know if they get on me about something with the machine, I will no longer be their cheap helper for small projects.
 

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My advice, beware of selling to family. It can cause more problems than you might think.

If you still want to sell to family, look up the cost of snow removal service contracts in your area and use one season worth of service as a base cost. Next, divide the original cost of the machine by the ten years it has served you, to get a yearly cost. The price you sell it for should land between the two; providing your nephew with a cost reduction, and you with a return on your investment.

Consider the wear on a ten year old machine and parts that commonly fail, such as belts, that you have not yet replaced. This can play heavily into the 'selling to family' concern. Reduce the selling price accordingly.

Give a 'family discount' to reduce the price as you see fit (ex: bigger reduction if your nephew helps you when help is needed).

Offer the machine as-is without warranty, and specify that the price also reflects this.

You will probably find that figure to be around $100 to $150, which should leave plenty room for for your nephew to maintain the machine properly during his first season with it (compared to a snow removal service contract).
 

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Not worth the risk. Let them price machines on their own. If it snows a lot they will find out what toughness means, wrt snowblowers. Your esteem will go up.
Don't get me wrong, i give away everything, but, truth is, people....
 

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He's your nephew, give it to him.

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
nephew? sorry not so good with family terms. Your bothers kid? would you sell it to your own kid? it's your brothers kid $20-$50 max Free 10 years old dude?
 
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