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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that single-stage snowblowers aren't self-propelled. I previously owned a Toro 721 single-stage (gas) that actually had a bit of self-propulsion. I mean, as the auger bit into the snow it would pull the machine forward a bit. That made it less difficult to go uphill.

I tried my new EGO 2110 single-stage (battery) for the first time today and I was surprised at how difficult it was to move it forward. Going uphill I had to put my full weight into it. Even going downhill I had to push it, whereas the Toro would pretty much go downhill on its own. Granted, there was about 8" of heavy wet snow. However, the Toro 721 performed much better in the same conditions in terms of effort.

The EGO's power seemed adequate for the task---it threw the heavy, wet snow about 20'. The Toro was definitely a stronger machine, even under a heavy load.

Any EGO single-stage owners here who can comment on the effort needed to move it forward?
 

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Had the same no pull issue with the TroyBilt 21 inch Squall..... was always a battle using for the 2 years I had it. (bought new from Lowe's) Sold it (happily) and bought a Toro 721QZE before last year snow fall. There is a huge difference between the 2. I believe the difference was the angle of attack / placement of the scraper bar to the wheels distance. The Toro scraper was spring loaded allowing the auger to dig in to propel..
 

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When the Toro was sold and the EGO was purchased, were you expecting a better machine?
The Toro had 50+ years worth of refinement engineered into it.
This falls in to the "You Should Have Known" category :)
 

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I believe part of the problem could be the design of the paddles. My neighbors EGO has significantly smaller paddles both in overall diameter and height of the blade (help maintain RPM's?) compared to my Toro single stage. It also didn't look like the Ego had much of it's paddles actually touching the pavement (barely scrapes it). With the Toro if you lift on the handle a little it greatly helps with forward motion and bite. The EGO didn't seem to respond to that and required a constant push by the operator as mentioned. I'm wondering if that's an intentional design issue to possibly keep the machine from bogging and to maintain maximum RPM.
 

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I'm wondering if that's an intentional design issue to possibly keep the machine from bogging and to maintain maximum RPM.
Now why do you suppose they'd do something like that? It would never be because they want to keep the motor wattage and battery platform amp hours low to achieve maximum run time on a single charge for an affordable price point, would it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So it sounds like this problem isn't my imagination. The strange thing is that I don't recall any reviews that mentioned that the EGO required too much effort, and I read a large number of reviews. I will have to wait for some less wet and heavy snow to see if that makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When the Toro was sold and the EGO was purchased, were you expecting a better machine?
The Toro had 50+ years worth of refinement engineered into it.
This falls in to the "You Should Have Known" category :)
I gave away the Toro due to constant engine and other mechanical problems and the horrific noise it made. I bought the EGO because I wanted to switch from gas to electric. I definitely have no regrets about that switch. Should have known what? There are hundreds of reviews of the EGO. Upon rechecking, I see only a few that mention it needed effort to push, and the videos don't show that either. That makes me think maybe mine is set up wrong, or the problem was the heavy wet snow, or I need to wax the chute and auger. I'm thinking that snow sticking to the auger could made the machine hard to push, and just the weight of the snow sticking to the auger, the chute, and the whole machine could make it feel like I'm having to push it hard. Also, when the auger is full and the snow isn't exiting the chute fast enough, it builds up in front of the scraper, which could increase the effort. Still, the Toro definitely had a forward creep that the EGO doesn't have. The Toro had good creep going uphill in heavy wet snow. It was a powerful thrower too. But its faults weren't tolerable (to me).
 

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Still, the Toro definitely had a forward creep that the EGO doesn't have. The Toro had good creep going uphill in heavy wet snow.
Yes, as already mentioned, the EGO does not have self propulsion like nearly all gas single stage blowers have. Single stage blowers drag their paddles on the ground to propel themselves forward. The EGO's paddles do not touch the ground and are smaller to conserve battery and provide better throwing, which they evidently felt was necessary due to its limited power.

The only electric single stages that I am aware of that are self propelled are the new Toros with "Power Propel". I would assume they are going to have less run time, but imagine they did that because larger, more expensive batteries are now available.

And also yes, the maintenance gas requires is not for everyone. Personally, I have had no issues keeping my small gas engines running well for decades.
 

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  • "I was surprised at how difficult it was to move it forward",
  • "The problem could be the design"
  • "They want to keep the motor wattage and battery platform amp hours low to achieve maximum run time on a single charge for an affordable price point"
  • "It should be fine in cold snow. Try and clear early morning if possible, or after it sets up at dusk. These electrics don't like mid-day clearing" (LOL)
  • "Snow isn't exiting the chute fast enough, it builds up in front of the scraper. "
  • "The problem was the heavy wet snow" (which = a big problem if you live on the eastern seaboard)
All these issues and restrictions dont make it seem worthwhile switching. And a lot of extra work put on the operator.
  • "There are hundreds of reviews of the EGO. Upon rechecking, I see only a few that mention it needed effort to push"
Who knows how many Green Weenies are submitting bogus rave reviews for this machine! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, as already mentioned, the EGO does not have self propulsion like nearly all gas single stage blowers have. Single stage blowers drag their paddles on the ground to propel themselves forward. The EGO's paddles do not touch the ground and are smaller to conserve battery and provide better throwing, which they evidently felt was necessary due to its limited power. The only electric single stages that I am aware of that are self propelled are the new Toros with "Power Propel". I would assume they are going to have less run time, but imagine they did that because larger, more expensive batteries are now available. And also yes, the maintenance gas requires is not for everyone. Personally, I have had no issues keeping my small gas engines running well for decades.
My Toro 721 was not self-propelled. It simply had some natural forward creep from the paddles that the EGO lacks. My EGO cleans the snow down to the pavement much better than the Toro did---I always had to shovel after the Toro but not the EGO. Also, my EGO has a steel auger, not rubber paddles. So I'm still not clear on what the problem is with the EGO and whether the effort required with my machine is characteristic of this model or a problem with my particular machine.

Things went a bit better today with slightly drier snow---no clogging, but still a lot of effort going uphill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
  • "I was surprised at how difficult it was to move it forward",
  • "The problem could be the design"
  • "They want to keep the motor wattage and battery platform amp hours low to achieve maximum run time on a single charge for an affordable price point"
  • "It should be fine in cold snow. Try and clear early morning if possible, or after it sets up at dusk. These electrics don't like mid-day clearing" (LOL)
  • "Snow isn't exiting the chute fast enough, it builds up in front of the scraper. "
  • "The problem was the heavy wet snow" (which = a big problem if you live on the eastern seaboard)
All these issues and restrictions dont make it seem worthwhile switching. And a lot of extra work put on the operator.
  • "There are hundreds of reviews of the EGO. Upon rechecking, I see only a few that mention it needed effort to push"
Who knows how many Green Weenies are submitting bogus rave reviews for this machine! :)

I don't know why you're LOLing ""It should be fine in cold snow. Try and clear early morning if possible, or after it sets up at dusk. These electrics don't like mid-day clearing." I noticed exactly that on the first day. Early morning went OK but by the time the sun hit the snow in the afternoon it got heavier and was harder to throw it very far. HillnGullyRider actually made a valid point about this. Your response is going to be: "Get a powerful gas machine and you won't have this problem." At some point there will be no more gas snowblowers, lawnmowers, etc. In the meantime, it's expected that battery machines will go through a long development phase. I waited until last year to get a battery snowblower because before that they weren't good enough. Same with single-stage---they've come a long way. And battery lawnmowers, specifically EGO, have really come very far. I never had so much fun taking care of my yard as last summer with a new EGO mower. First time ever that I finished all yardwork by the fall---more work, less effort. I can't wait to add an EGO string trimmer and blower. I can live with the imperfections of battery machines because the advantages vastly outweigh the disadvantages.

I. AM. DONE. WITH. GAS. Fumes, noise, temperamental engines, heavy, expensive gas, broken pull cords, dirty carburetors, air filters, oil. All done. Fini. Finito. Fertig. законченный.
 

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Yes, as already mentioned, the EGO does not have self propulsion like nearly all gas single stage blowers have. Single stage blowers drag their paddles on the ground to propel themselves forward. The EGO's paddles do not touch the ground and are smaller to conserve battery and provide better throwing, which they evidently felt was necessary due to its limited power.

The only electric single stages that I am aware of that are self propelled are the new Toros with "Power Propel". I would assume they are going to have less run time, but imagine they did that because larger, more expensive batteries are now available.

And also yes, the maintenance gas requires is not for everyone. Personally, I have had no issues keeping my small gas engines running well for decades.
It would have been silly for Toro to develop a new blower that was less efficient (e.g. propulsion wise) than their gas model SS. I think the other electric companies maybe shooting themselves in the foot by ignoring this feature and what Toro is doing. They are probably the only electric blower I would consider because they are well aware of the necessary and desired operating characteristics most customers would be looking for. Until electric units are equal too or better than my Toro gas single stage I see no reason to replace it as well.
 

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My ion18sb has self propel (paddle assist to be more accurate). It works only to an extent that the accumulation you are clearing is not saturated with water and it's not above the axis of the paddle (about 5 inches) beyond this any self propulsion becomes far less effective. It's a hybrid machine so when conditions like that stall it, you can plug in the cord and it will have more power than a fully charged 40v battery.
I paid $99 for it on a black Friday deal and extra batteries are $55. Is it worth having even though it's not a one blower cures all ills solution? You bet...It's 35 lbs and clears nuisance snows incredibly fast. Super easy to store, and move around when not under power. Is it made for sloped driveways? Nope. gravel? Nope, compacted tire tracks? Nope...It is what it is.
I've tried a lot of blowers over the years, from big pro models to these battery lightweights and the best one size fits all, at least for me and the local conditions encountered, Is the Ariens 932500, which drives much like a single stage but has accuracy and tunneling ability of a 2S, It's still happy whether you are clearing less than an inch of snow or tunneling through a 4ft frozen plow pile. It will do both if need be. If they made one with a powerful electric motor would I consider a new one? Yes...but I wouldn't ditch the gas version.

Too many people let perfect get in the way of pretty good.
 

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I think general snow blower reviews are like tire reviews, virtually worthless. I have read many tire reviews on how treacherous partcular tires were and it was, really? I have those.

Here you get a highly refined type of snow blower user so you get more accurate report (grin).
 

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I am 100% supportive of battery powered products IF they work as good as or better. Still got a ways to go.

The Marketing Manager of EGO is sitting on a beach in Aruba smoking cigars telling his buddies the secret to such a great sales performance, and it goes something like this...

"There are many consumers that have loathed internal combustion engine power equipment their entire lives. And the goverment is pushing hard to go electric for everything. So all we had to do was put some cool looking products on the market and they will buy them. Even if they don't work very good, it's like stealing candy from a baby right now."
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've now used my EGO for the third time, and I'm less enthusiastic about it than initially. Snow in my area is very often wet and heavy, and I don't think the EGO excels in that. I do like that the steel auger works on the crud at the end of the driveway, although the throw with that is very short, like 5 feet. I rate it a zero going up a sloped driveway. I also noticed that because the power is only moderate, it loses the battle against the wind. My driveway is about 15 feet wide. The EGO does not have the ability to throw the snow all the way across 15 feet without dropping a lot of the snow into the driveway. Result: gradual buildup up of snow on the far side in the driveway, which the EGO can't handle well. To avoid that I first blow a path down the center and then blow to each sides from the center. That means blowing against the wind. Full admission: this afternoon I used the shovel in the end and to be honest, it was more effective. However, I can't say strongly enough how much I disliked the gas Toro single stage. I will keep the EGO and see if there are times when it's more useful, like with dry snow. Maybe I'll learn to work with its foibles.

Now comparing the snowblower with the EGO non-self-propelled lawn mower, I'm glad I didn't get a self-propelled mower. The standard mower work just fine, great in fact, and it's a lighter, simpler machine. I guess it's obvious that a snowblower needs some way of moving through the snow---either self-propulsion, or the auger pulls it forward a bit, or you push it.
 

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My Toro 721 was not self-propelled. It simply had some natural forward creep from the paddles that the EGO lacks. My EGO cleans the snow down to the pavement much better than the Toro did---I always had to shovel after the Toro but not the EGO. Also, my EGO has a steel auger, not rubber paddles. So I'm still not clear on what the problem is with the EGO and whether the effort required with my machine is characteristic of this model or a problem with my particular machine.
To be clear, your Toro 721 was self propelled in the manner I explained. The more you lift up/push forward on the handlebar, driving the auger into the ground, the more it propels itself. That is why it had rubber paddles, metal ones would cause damage. It should have also cleared right down to the pavement for the same reason, unless there was icy hardpack, the scaper was not adjusted correctly, or the paddles were worn down. The EGO does not have any self propel and that is by design to conserve power. If you want a self propelled electric single stage, your options are limited. The downsides to the self propel models are less battery life and the rubber paddles are a consumable part which require periodic replacement.

It would have been silly for Toro to develop a new blower that was less efficient (e.g. propulsion wise) than their gas model SS.
They did, though. Same as EGO with metal augers. Only the new models this year have gone back to self propel rubber augers. I would expect EGO to follow suit soon as it is a common complaint.
 
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