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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Single stage blowers drag their paddles on the ground to propel themselves forward. The EGO's paddles do not touch the ground and are smaller to conserve battery and provide better throwing, which they evidently felt was necessary due to its limited power.
To be clear, your Toro 721 was self propelled in the manner I explained. The more you lift up/push forward on the handlebar, driving the auger into the ground, the more it propels itself. That is why it had rubber paddles, metal ones would cause damage. It should have also cleared right down to the pavement for the same reason, unless there was icy hardpack, the scaper was not adjusted correctly, or the paddles were worn down. The EGO does not have any self propel and that is by design to conserve power. If you want a self propelled electric single stage, your options are limited. The downsides to the self propel models are less battery life and the rubber paddles are a consumable part which require periodic replacement.

They did, though. Same as EGO with metal augers. Only the new models this year have gone back to self propel rubber augers. I would expect EGO to follow suit soon as it is a common complaint.
Thanks for this. I don't fully understand. Are you saying that the EGO with rubber paddles does or does not move itself forward by contact with the ground? It sounds like you're saying that the METAL AUGER is my main problem---that a metal auger cannot touch the pavement. That would make sense. I really wasn't aware of this issue when I bought the machine.
 

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Thanks for this. I don't fully understand. Are you saying that the EGO with rubber paddles does or does not move itself forward by contact with the ground? It sounds like you're saying that the METAL AUGER is my main problem---that a metal auger cannot touch the pavement. That would make sense. I really wasn't aware of this issue when I bought the machine.
Sorry I wasn't aware that EGO now makes that too, but it appears that they do, calling it Auger Propelled. So yes, that model would be propelled similar to your old Toro, with the rubber auger touching the ground.

The EGO Auger Propelled looks like an interesting design, more of an auger shape. I wonder how it compares in use to Toro's design which is more of a paddle.

Edit: corrected terminology.
 

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Thanks for this. I don't fully understand. Are you saying that the EGO with rubber paddles does or does not move itself forward by contact with the ground? It sounds like you're saying that the METAL AUGER is my main problem---that a metal auger cannot touch the pavement. That would make sense. I really wasn't aware of this issue when I bought the machine.
Perhaps some pictures are in order so we can all be on the same page. I find it impossible to diagnose issues without a specific model number, (not the model name, the model number right next to the serial number.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I just spent an hour reading the reviews for the EGO steel auger snowblower, and I do clearly see quite a few comments about how difficult it is to push this machine, especially uphill. My bad! I thought I had researched this snowblower very carefully and compared it to all of the competition, but I missed that one important complaint. I'm enlightened. Thanks to all for your explanations---very helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Sorry I wasn't aware that EGO now makes that too, but it appears that they do, calling it Auger Propelled. So yes, that model would be propelled similar to your old Toro, with the rubber auger touching the ground.

The EGO Auger Propelled looks like an interesting design, more of an auger shape. I wonder how it compares in use to Toro's design which is more of a paddle.

Edit: corrected terminology.
I wasn't aware of the auger-propelled model. A review: "The SNT2125AP auger-propelled snow blower is a step up to my previous basic EGO+ blower, it moves easier and have more blowing distance. However, the auger-propelled mechanism is only marginally better and you still have to push it."
 

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I just spent an hour reading the reviews for the EGO steel auger snowblower, and I do clearly see quite a few comments about how difficult it is to push this machine, especially uphill. My bad! I thought I had researched this snowblower very carefully and compared it to all of the competition, but I missed that one important complaint. I'm enlightened. Thanks to all for your explanations---very helpful.
OK, you have the EGO SNT2110 correct? Finding the right model helps. The bad news is it looks like you purchased the wrong blower for your local conditions. This model looks as if there is zero ground contact save for the scrapper bar. I can see why you might be having a less than pleasant experience with this machine on your local conditions. The bottom line is that if there is no rubber on the pavement, then all forward locomotion is supplied by YOU, the operator. The steeper it gets, the more elbow grease required (note: unit supplied without special cold temp elbow grease).
I didn't even know they made this model, and for the life of me, can't understand what niche it may fill other than clearing level wood decking without destroying it.
The possible good news is: you may be able to retrofit the rubber auger from the sister model if you can find the replacement parts.
However, I don't know if this will completely solve the problem because it looks like even the rubber auger model lacks good ground contact.
If you wish to supply less elbow grease, the rubber needs to contact the pavement enough to provide traction.
 

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I. AM. DONE. WITH. GAS. Fumes, noise, temperamental engines, heavy, expensive gas, broken pull cords, dirty carburetors, air filters, oil. All done. Fini. Finito. Fertig. законченный.
Quit beating around the bush and tell us what you really think.:)

I can sort of understand your aversion to gasoline engines. My father, an electrician, hated them with a passion. He even bought a corded electric lawn mower made by Sunbeam in the late 1950's or early '60's that even he had to later admit was a worthless POS. Some of my relatives feel the same way. But to me, and many others, gas engines are an interesting and pleasurable tool, and I for one derive much satisfaction in using a well-tuned gas engine and repairing one that can be repaired.

I really think that for snow blowers, electric just is not "ready for prime time" because the energy density of batteries just isn't there compared to a gallon of gasoline. I'm not anti-electric for OPE; I have an electric battery powered string trimmer, two different electric hedge trimmers, and a blower used only for grass after mowing. I'm thinking of an electric mower, but for my size yard they too aren't "there yet". Maybe in a few more years.

But snow blowers are much more demanding of power because they have to move a lot of heavy weight, much farther than a lawn mower, and quickly. I'm thinking for a snowfall of a foot or more any electric would be hopelessly underpowered and if it even got to the end of the driveway without overheating the battery would be exhausted by then. Ariens rates their snowblowers by "tons per hour" of snow moved - I have no idea if that is a standard engineering measure or mere marketing. (I'll grant it's probably the latter.) But even cutting it in half that's moving a lot of weight as anyone who has ever shoveled snow is well aware. I shoveled a lot of it growing up which is why I'm so grateful to own the Ariens snow blowers I have now. They are truly wonderful machines! And having been familiar with the care and feeding of gasoline engines since childhood I rarely have any problems with them.

Best of luck with the electric battery powered snow blowers. I think you're going to be consistently disappointed in them until at least the next breakthough in battery energy density, or maybe two more. The power a snow blower needs to run on a battery just is not there yet and I don't see it happening for at least another decade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Quit beating around the bush and tell us what you really think.:)

I can sort of understand your aversion to gasoline engines. My father, an electrician, hated them with a passion. He even bought a corded electric lawn mower made by Sunbeam in the late 1950's or early '60's that even he had to later admit was a worthless POS. Some of my relatives feel the same way. But to me, and many others, gas engines are an interesting and pleasurable tool, and I for one derive much satisfaction in using a well-tuned gas engine and repairing one that can be repaired.

I really think that for snow blowers, electric just is not "ready for prime time" because the energy density of batteries just isn't there compared to a gallon of gasoline. I'm not anti-electric for OPE; I have an electric battery powered string trimmer, two different electric hedge trimmers, and a blower used only for grass after mowing. I'm thinking of an electric mower, but for my size yard they too aren't "there yet". Maybe in a few more years.

But snow blowers are much more demanding of power because they have to move a lot of heavy weight, much farther than a lawn mower, and quickly. I'm thinking for a snowfall of a foot or more any electric would be hopelessly underpowered and if it even got to the end of the driveway without overheating the battery would be exhausted by then. Ariens rates their snowblowers by "tons per hour" of snow moved - I have no idea if that is a standard engineering measure or mere marketing. (I'll grant it's probably the latter.) But even cutting it in half that's moving a lot of weight as anyone who has ever shoveled snow is well aware. I shoveled a lot of it growing up which is why I'm so grateful to own the Ariens snow blowers I have now. They are truly wonderful machines! And having been familiar with the care and feeding of gasoline engines since childhood I rarely have any problems with them.

Best of luck with the electric battery powered snow blowers. I think you're going to be consistently disappointed in them until at least the next breakthough in battery energy density, or maybe two more. The power a snow blower needs to run on a battery just is not there yet and I don't see it happening for at least another decade.
Thanks for the way you explained things, especially "Snow blowers are much more demanding of power because they have to move a lot of heavy weight, much farther than a lawn mower, and quickly. " To be clear, my Toro 721 was powerful but incredibly noisy and the engine was a dud. I suspect that the previous owner ("I used it only 3 times") left gas in it over the summer. I didn't run right even after I had the carb cleaned etc.

For a foot of snow or more I don't mind going out more than once during a storm.

I urge you to consider an EGO lawnmower. I love mine. It was a game changer. I get more mowing done in less time. My lawn is one acre, divided into a lot of different sections with all sorts of obstacles and hills. The EGO mower has all the power I need and it runs as long as I want to mow (about 45 minutes). I have no complaints at all about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
The tradeoff as I see it is: You can get the steel auger and be able to handle the ice at the bottom of the driveway but not have self-propulsion, or you can get the rubber paddles and have self-propulsion but the ice will tear up the paddles.
 

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The tradeoff as I see it is: You can get the steel auger and be able to handle the ice at the bottom of the driveway but not have self-propulsion, or you can get the rubber paddles and have self-propulsion but the ice will tear up the paddles.
Not necessarily, you'd be surprised how tough rubber actually is....there are even outfits that produce polyurethane paddles for even more durability. I've found the best way to deal with ice is to clear early and often. Not having to cut through any, is the best way to deal with ice...unfortunately that's not always possible so I understand. Having a slope and ice, makes things miserable, so I understand your concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
OK from that pic it appears there is one pitiful little scrap of rubber on the center paddle (the section that actually lifts the snow). Does that rubber make ground contact? I don't know whether that's adjustable or designed not to be, but if it doesn't contact the surface, I can see that making a world of difference in terms of propulsion assist.
Are you looking at the right photo? The 2112 has no paddles; it's an all-steel auger.
 

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I know that single-stage snowblowers aren't self-propelled. I previously owned a Toro 721 single-stage (gas) that actually had a bit of self-propulsion. I mean, as the auger bit into the snow it would pull the machine forward a bit. That made it less difficult to go uphill. I tried my new EGO 2110 single-stage (battery) for the first time today and I was surprised at how difficult it was to move it forward. Going uphill I had to put my full weight into it. Even going downhill I had to push it, whereas the Toro would pretty much go downhill on its own. Granted, there was about 8" of heavy wet snow. However, the Toro 721 performed much better in the same conditions in terms of effort. The EGO's power seemed adequate for the task---it threw the heavy, wet snow about 20'. The Toro was definitely a stronger machine, even under a heavy load. Any EGO single-stage owners here who can comment on the effort needed to move it forward?
I've been watching videos and have ordered a Toro Snow Master 824. This is an 8hp with 24” width path. It is self propelled. It is with Toro’s personal pace system.look like a two stage, but just a single stage. It kicks butt going through the snow. Check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I spent an hour and a half today dealing with a few inches of very heavy, wet snow. I didn't even try to use the EGO due to a two-foot bank of very hard snow and ice at the bottom of the driveway. It was brutal doing this by hand. I think the error that people in the Northeast make is thinking that heavy wet snow is an exception here. It's not. It's the norm. I can well imagine that the EGO would do well in light, dry snow, but I can't remember the last time I saw such snow. Live and learn!
 

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I spent an hour and a half today dealing with a few inches of very heavy, wet snow. I didn't even try to use the EGO due to a two-foot bank of very hard snow and ice at the bottom of the driveway. It was brutal doing this by hand. I think the error that people in the Northeast make is thinking that heavy wet snow is an exception here. It's not. It's the norm. I can well imagine that the EGO would do well in light, dry snow, but I can't remember the last time I saw such snow. Live and learn!
When I moved into my neighborhood most of my neighbors had single stage machines. Our driveways aren't that big, 2-3 cars wide and 30-50 feet long. For most snowfalls they worked well but the problem is when you need something more it can make for a very miserable time. Today they all have 2 stage machines. EGO and Toro both make electric two stage blowers, but they really only compare to entry level gas machines. As much as I would love to be able to blow snow at 6:00 in the morning without waking up the neighborhood, they just aren't where I need them to be yet. They will be at some point.

If I need a new mower it will almost certainly be electric. Trouble is that there has never been anything wrong with my 15 year old Toro Super Recycler and electrics, while good enough, still can't beat its performance. So I just keep waiting.
 
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