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Discussion Starter #1
In larger Canadian cities like here in Montreal, the streets are cleared by large city snowblowers that put the snow in dump trucks, which then bring their load to snow depots. These are large vacant lots where the snow is then piled high and allowed to melt well into the summer months. Some of these piles are over 100 feet high. To pile it that high, there are special high power snowblowers designed for that purpose. They are designed as attachments to a loader and have their own engines. The spec sheet for the Larue D-97 in the pic below mentions that it has over 1000 hp and can throw snow up to 180 feet away. These beasts are built in Quebec city.

A D-87 in action:

 

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I wonder how fast the impeller spins to be able to throw the snow 180ft with that short chute (short in relation to the impeller size).
But most importantly what is the impeller tip speed and its diameter? :blush:
 

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Features

Performance


  • Capacity: up to 8,500 metric tons / hour
  • Throwing distance: up to 55 m (180 ft.)
Dimension


  • Approximate length from hitch plate: 3.7 m (144 in.)
  • Overall width: 3.2 m (126 in)
  • Overall height:
  • Working height: 1.9 m (75 in.)
  • Weight: 12,250 kg (27,000 lbs.)
Engine


  • Power: 783-858 kW (1050-1150 HP)
  • Filtration with pre-filter
  • Caterpillar C27
Impeller


  • Impeller casting: 90° total cast angle: Vertical to left, horizontal to right from the ground
  • Diameter: 1.8 m (70 in.)
  • Number of blades: 6
Impeller Casing


  • One piece shotgun-type with output resistant to abrasion of up to 500 Brinell Hardness
Options


  • Female quick coupler
  • Right hydraulic side rudder
  • Residential-type muffler

70" impeller diameter.......!!! and weighs only 13-1/2 tons......!!! :blush:
 

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A number of early snowblowers had that design, no auger just a large impeller, wonder why they abandoned it?
 

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A number of early snowblowers had that design, no auger just a large impeller, wonder why they abandoned it?
You mean like this... :blush:



Homko and Craftsman are the two I know were like that, although I think I saw somewhere an Ariens very early snowblower design kind of like it.... :blush:

But if you browse at the following link, You'll find more makers of the "fan only" style blowers.
The Gilson Snowblower Shop's Vintage Machine Showcase

My guess for the change in design perhaps was safety regulations..... and/or efficiency..... :blush:
 

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This is what I saw for an early Ariens......

Ariens Snow Blowers



The Great Depression had only been underway for a few years when an idea was sparked in 1933. Henry Ariens’s company, Brillion Iron Works, the one he had spent 40 years building, was gone in an instant. But instead of giving up and rolling over, Ariens and his three sons turned their focus elsewhere.
Using a $1,500 loan borrowed against his life insurance policy and another $1,500 raised by selling stock shares, the four Ariens built what would eventually become one of America’s premier snow blower companies, starting with America’s first man-made rotary tiller.
And now, 80 years later, winter weather dwellers everywhere are as familiar with an Ariens snow blower as they are with the season itself.

Here is the link

https://www.snowblowersource.com/promotions/history-of-snow-blowers/


 

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Discussion Starter #10
My guess for the change in design perhaps was safety regulations..... and/or efficiency..... :blush:
Or how about the limited width that can be cleared without needing a huge impeller? Railroads don't need to clear a huge swath and they still do use the rotary design:

 

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Or how about the limited width that can be cleared without needing a huge impeller?
Good point.
That thought did come to my mind, but I thought it would be covered by "inefficient".

If one was made with two impellers that would turn in apossite directions and and use a single chute, that would be more efficient :blush:
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Another issue is getting a large (thus heavy) impeller to spin at high speed requires a lot of power, easily slowed down by getting bogged down into thicker snow. Having much slower, geared down augers allows for greater torque in breaking up the snow (especially if it's been plowed and packed) and then bring the snow to a smaller impeller makes for a lower power engine still able to throw the snow at a good distance.
 

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Another issue is getting a large (thus heavy) impeller to spin at high speed requires a lot of power, easily slowed down by getting bogged down into thicker snow. Having much slower, geared down augers allows for greater torque in breaking up the snow (especially if it's been plowed and packed) and then bring the snow to a smaller impeller makes for a lower power engine still able to throw the snow at a good distance.
Makes sense :blush:
 

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RE: Fan Only Snow Throwers
We had an old Eska "Sno-Flyr" that my Dad bought from W.T. Grant and I don't remember the engine being excessively loud, but the drivetrain to get that auger to spin fast was. I could be wrong but I think it spun all the time and you didn't want to get anywhere near the front of that thing.
 

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The Leslie rotary plows in Europe have been replaced by the self propelled Beilhack snow clearers and a few Zaugg self propelled units.

A few leslie type machines are still in railway museums and there are a few working unit in Eastern Europe.

The Beilhack railway snow clearers can clear over 22000 tons per hour of snow pack with the new larger engines.
 

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