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My next door neighbor just brought home a Toro CCR powerlite single stage (16" , 98cc 2 stroke) which he inherited from a family member. It apparently sat around for a number of years and won't start. He's used my Toro 2450 and thought that between the two of us we'd get this thing going. Base on experience I know the carb will need a cleaning or a cheap chinese replacement one. The fuel tank also has a lot of built up oil residue so we'll be cleaning that. I went to pull the plug and it required a lot of force even after a soaking with liquid wrench. I eventually got it out with a slow back and forth movement. The new plug, however, does not want to go in easily. It gets hung up real quickly and won't cleanly start. My gut tells me that it was probably cross threaded in the past. I don't want to ruin the head on his "new to him" machine so I didn't try to force it in. I thought about getting a spark plug chaser to clean up the threads but I have honestly never used one before. I know I need a 14mm one and to keep any shavings from entering the plug hole. It appears to be pretty staightforward, but I thought I should seek advice before actually doing it. Any do's and don't's I should be aware of? Thanks.
 

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My next door neighbor just brought home a Toro CCR powerlite single stage (16" , 98cc 2 stroke) which he inherited from a family member. It apparently sat around for a number of years and won't start. He's used my Toro 2450 and thought that between the two of us we'd get this thing going. Base on experience I know the carb will need a cleaning or a cheap chinese replacement one. The fuel tank also has a lot of built up oil residue so we'll be cleaning that. I went to pull the plug and it required a lot of force even after a soaking with liquid wrench. I eventually got it out with a slow back and forth movement. The new plug, however, does not want to go in easily. It gets hung up real quickly and won't cleanly start. My gut tells me that it was probably cross threaded in the past. I don't want to ruin the head on his "new to him" machine so I didn't try to force it in. I thought about getting a spark plug chaser to clean up the threads but I have honestly never used one before. I know I need a 14mm one and to keep any shavings from entering the plug hole. It appears to be pretty staightforward, but I thought I should seek advice before actually doing it. Any do's and don't's I should be aware of? Thanks.
These thread chasers work. Use grease on the thread to capture the shavings. Use patience. After done pull starter rope a bunch and it will blow out any shavings that may have fallen in cylinder.
I have only done this 3-4 times with success. I'm sure others will come along with more tips.

good luck.
 

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There's also plug thread chasers called a "backtap" that you insert and expand, allowing you to chase from the inside out.

I have used this but not very good. results . I used a cheaper model. If you get one buy the best you can find. Perhaps works better.
 

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Either or works, grease is a definite need as stated. Me...it's a simple 2 stroke, I'd pop the head off and chase it, you may not hurt the gasket at all. You'll then have zero worries of filings in the cylinder.
 

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Two stroke means you have a big exhaust port low in the cylinder. Put the piston at the bottom, block the carburetor with masking tape. Use compressed air to push any shavings out. Do the grease trick of course -- a couple turns maybe, and the chaser comes out and the dirty grease gets replaced with new. The back in for another couple turns.

A good thread chaser re-forms the old metal threads back towards where they used to be, so in theory there should be no shavings. More shavings means less original metal to hold the plug. There are metal thread inserts available for aluminum heads if you can't get the threads correct with a thread chaser.
 

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Old timer taught me to put piston at just past BDC, on the upstroke. Fill the cylinder with shaving cream, the cheap foamy stuff. Grease the tap, tap, then crank the motor.

The shaving cream will hold any chips the grease misses, and dispel them out the plug hole when cranked.
 

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I'd pull the head. Then you can chase the threads from the inside out using a regular tap. Much lower chance of cross threading the tap this way than going in from the side that was damaged. I've never used the back out chaser, and I think it would take a bit more skill and experience to use it correctly.
 

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I wouldn't use any grease and use a vacuum.
 

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Try some Free-All, I bought some last year at Mills Fleet Farm, truly amazing stuff, all my other cans of penetrant is in a box on the lower shelf now this stuff works so good to loosen nuts and bolts.
 

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geesus , why remove the head when these other tools usually work. removing is the last resort.
Because there are no valves, no springs, no rockers no rods. Removing a head on a Tec hsk600 series is easier than all the valve stem grinding, "pull the carb", and leak down tests suggested every day on here.

Rectangle Font Circle Number Screenshot
 

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Because there are no valves, no springs, no rockers no rods. Removing a head on a Tec hsk600 series is easier than all the valve stem grinding, "pull the carb", and leak down tests suggested every day on here.

View attachment 183452
Thanks I get it. But maybe I should have clarified my response. Generally speaking Most blowers have heads with all that garbage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions. My neighbor picked up a chase at O'reilly's this morning. We mulled over the options and decided to grease it up (anti-seize) and give it a go. His machine so he did it. It was a tad stubborn at first but it worked well and had it rotating smoothly in no time. There weren't to many pieces of metal on the chase when done. We used the shop vac with a inlet reducer for a super suck final clean-up. The new plug threaded right in. It turned out to be a drama free experience! The carb parts soaked over night in some mineral spirits so we'll finish cleaning that this morning. Sprayed the inside of the gas tank with some carb cleaner and it did quick work of the dried oil residue. Cleaned the inside of the fuel line as well. Checked the paddles, belt and pulley's which all looked OK for now but the scraper bar may need replacement. Hopefully we'll have this little machine fired up this afternoon! Thanks again.
 

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My next door neighbor just brought home a Toro CCR powerlite single stage (16" , 98cc 2 stroke) which he inherited from a family member. It apparently sat around for a number of years and won't start. He's used my Toro 2450 and thought that between the two of us we'd get this thing going. Base on experience I know the carb will need a cleaning or a cheap chinese replacement one. The fuel tank also has a lot of built up oil residue so we'll be cleaning that. I went to pull the plug and it required a lot of force even after a soaking with liquid wrench. I eventually got it out with a slow back and forth movement. The new plug, however, does not want to go in easily. It gets hung up real quickly and won't cleanly start. My gut tells me that it was probably cross threaded in the past. I don't want to ruin the head on his "new to him" machine so I didn't try to force it in. I thought about getting a spark plug chaser to clean up the threads but I have honestly never used one before. I know I need a 14mm one and to keep any shavings from entering the plug hole. It appears to be pretty staightforward, but I thought I should seek advice before actually doing it. Any do's and don't's I should be aware of? Thanks.
Run that sucker in with an impact. You’ll never need to replace it.
 

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Just as well, run it in that hard, you'll never get it out again.
Or it will fall/blow out next time the engine runs. Leaves a nice smooth-bore hole where threads used to be. Slightly easier to inspect the top of the piston though. ;)
 
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