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Hello,
I have a Noma 27” 8 HP snow thrower. When I put it in reverse I can’t just put it back into first gear because it will stay in reverse. I have to put it in gear 3 or 4 to go forward again. Than I can put it in first or second gear. Any ideas why?
Thank you,
Earl
 

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Welcome to the forum! It sounds like you have some slop or play in the speed-control mechanism, and/or it needs to be adjusted.

It's almost certainly a friction disk drive. You change speeds by moving the position of a rubber wheel over a spinning friction disk. Position the rubber wheel to one side of the friction disk, and you go forward. Move it further towards the edge of the disk, and you go faster. Position it over the other side of the disk, and you go backwards.

It sounds like you have enough play in the system, or it's sufficiently out-of-adjustment, that going to Forward 1, from Reverse, puts the rubber wheel basically over the center of the friction disk. So nothing really happens (other than kind of grinding a flat spot on the rubber wheel). When you go to Forward 3, then back to Forward 1, you've taken up enough backlash in the system than the rubber wheel ends up in the proper location.

You could tip the machine on its nose, and remove the bottom cover, to take a better look.

Or, as at least a short-term fix, you could adjust the speed-control mechanism to bias things more towards the forward direction. If forward 4, as an example, pulls on a linkage more than forward 1 does, then adjust it so you've pulled the linkage a little more than it does now.
 

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Cable or rod adjustment. Follow RedOctobyr.
 

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You want to be careful on just "
tipping it on its nose.
Fluids tend to pour out, often gas from the carburetor and fuel tank and possibly engine oil.

You may need to drain the fuel tank and carb and possibly the engine oil drained.

Its possible to hydro a cylinder if left that way too long with oil leaking around the rings.
 

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Agreed, follow your owner's manual's procedure for tipping the machine forward onto its nose.

On mine, I close the fuel shutoff, so gas won't pour through the carb. Running the carb dry first also helps. If I have more than maybe a half-tank of gas, I risk gas coming out through the vent in the gas cap. So I put a plastic sandwich bag over the opening to the tank, then screw the cap down over it.
 

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Agreed, follow your owner's manual's procedure for tipping the machine forward onto its nose.



On mine, I close the fuel shutoff, so gas won't pour through the carb. Running the carb dry first also helps. If I have more than maybe a half-tank of gas, I risk gas coming out through the vent in the gas cap. So I put a plastic sandwich bag over the opening to the tank, then screw the cap down over it.
That or a latex glove works well for putting under the gas cap. I haven't had any problems with fluids once I did that.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

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I have tried a latex glove on my Ariens that has the LCT engine. In my case, the teeth on the cap are pretty sharp and shredded the glove when I screwed it’s back in, allowing for some gas to dribble out.

I picked up a $10 siphon on Amazon and couldn’t be happier. It’s two hose ends with a bulb in the middle. Wished I’d had it years ago instead of trying the dreadful mouth method to siphon.
 

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I'm fortunate that my Tecumseh tank threads are fairly large and smooth, so they don't tear things up while installing the cap.

I thought gas kind of attacks latex? I wonder if nitrile gloves might hold up better, if available. Polyethylene bags have worked well for me, polyethylene is what the tanks/gas cans are often made of.

I have a basic siphon pump, which works nicely, but I'll admit I usually just seal the cap. Not that I have to do it often.

Draining the tank is certainly a more guaranteed approach, no worries about whether something gets a hole in it. And the caps on some tanks are apparently kind of finicky, so putting something under the cap might be extra tough.
 

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While you have the machine tilted on its bucket and the bottom cover off, check the hex shaft that the friction disc travels on is lubricated slightly. Move the friction wheel to one side and grease the hex shaft and then move the disc to the other side and grease the rest of the shaft. Over greasing may allow grease to fly off the shaft and contact the drive disc so grease sparingly.
 

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However you get to look inside the drive area check the hex shaft for tilting side to side. That Murray/Noma style system uses interior mounted bearings that wear and can bind. Like Town mentioned do the greasing of the hex shaft. I've seen dry shafts people horsed around shifting and pop the ends out of the bearings. They really are more like wobble bushings and wear pretty quickly. If the hex shaft has excessive play or tilt it can bind the shifting like you describe.
 

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The Noma you have was made by Murray, same as my Brute which has a shifter rod adjustment problem… But... if yours has to be put in "3" or "4" to go forward, I'm thinking that it could be because of like "RedOctobyr" said, some wear (or slop) in the linkage mechanism.
Good luck,

Claude.:)
 

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While you have the machine tilted on its bucket and the bottom cover off, check the hex shaft that the friction disc travels on is lubricated slightly. Move the friction wheel to one side and grease the hex shaft and then move the disc to the other side and grease the rest of the shaft. Over greasing may allow grease to fly off the shaft and contact the drive disc so grease sparingly.
I would be more inclined to think it is a case of the disc hanging up on the shaft but that's just a guess. Cleaning up the shaft and adding a little bit of oil or grease might be the cure.


.
 

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I would be more inclined to think it is a case of the disc hanging up on the shaft but that's just a guess. Cleaning up the shaft and adding a little bit of oil or grease might be the cure.
Exactly, that is what happens if the hex shaft is not greased and dries out, it is quite hard to move with the shifter. There are many possibilities for the OP's symptoms so the greasing of the shaft is just one. Can't do any harm to check since I have fixed one or two that behaved like that.

The "plastic" bearing surface that allows the friction disc shifter to slide on the hex shaft does not work well without grease. I would not use oil.
 

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Is there a good grease for those hex shafts? I don't remember if I used my wheel bearing grease, or my snowmobile grease, on mine.

But in either case, it is somewhat tacky and sticky. Seems like there is probably something that would glide better, while avoiding getting flung off, onto the friction disk.
 

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I'm a fan of use a spray graphite or other similar dry lubricant for the hex shaft duty. It doesn't sling off while spinning, and doesn't get herded to one side and the other when you change speed selection. Be sure to mask off the other rotating bits of course. I had mine apart for some work on the little planetary drive boxes, so the shaft was out on the work bench anyway. FWIW, the manual for the machine sez never to add grease to any of the rotating bits in the drive box. Probably why I was in there replacing the bearings in the little planetary drives and the shaft they ride on... The new needle bearings are packed with long-fiber synthetic wheel bearing grease now, and will hopefully last longer than the original ones did with [limited-]lifetime [no] lubrication from the factory.
 

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White lithium grease works well, apply only a thin coat. I've also used general purpose grease and 00 grease, those worked as well.
 

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White lithium grease works well, apply only a thin coat. I've also used general purpose grease and 00 grease, those worked as well.
+1 on the white Lithium. Een using it for years and never had a.problem.
 

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Thanks. Next time I have the cover off I'll try one of those. I do also have some dry bike lube which I like, it goes on as a liquid, then dries. That could be an option, as long as I shielded it from dripping onto the friction disk while applying it.
 
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