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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I store my Cub Cadet in the garage at my ski cabin. The garage is actually used for wood storage and work shop, not cars. I'm trying to figure out how to get most of the snow off the snowblower when I bring it in, to keep from having a large puddle on the floor. Most of the time our snow is pretty dense and often near freezing so it sticks to the blades and housing. I store Northern Idaho Energy Logs (AKA Presto Logs) in the garage, and they do not like damp conditions at all.

Any one have suggestions about getting a snowblower dry, without spending hours with a heat gun, air hose or towels?
 

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Maybe put it up on some wood blocks, like a couple of 2x4s cut to the width of the snowblower under the tires and bucket so it would have air circulating under and around it. Even then if the air temperature is below freezing that won't do much. That still would be a good practice so it isn't sitting in a puddle of water when the snow does melt. It would help with rust prevention and not leave rust marks on the concrete floor (if you care).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I clean off the snowblower outside before I bring it back into my shop. If it is a Sunny day, I will leave it out until any snow residue is gone ...
I left it out in the sun to dry last weekend, but during the Winter, we don't see much of the big orange ball.

My garage is normally above freezing, since it is a daylight basement. I'm mostly worried about keeping the compressed wood logs dry. They tend to disintegrate in high humidity. We burn a lot of real wood, but the Jotul really likes the compressed wood, especially if we are trying to keep a small fire.

Any other suggestions for getting the residual snow out of it. I considered turning a hose on it, since I have an outdoor hydrant now. It would be messy, and might make an ice rink in my driveway..
 

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Mine sits on a cheap H-F 4-wheel dolly, with a boot tray under the bucket. After cleaning the bulk of the snow off outside, any remaining melt-off gathers in the boot tray. You can sub a restoraunt bus tray if it needs to hold more water. If the snow doesn't melt off in your storage, it will still be there when you go to use it again. No harm really so long as the machine isn't sitting (and freezing again in,,,) the captured melt-off water. If that tray freezes, i's easy enough to pop the ice out of it outside.
 

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I never have an issue however that is likely due to the fact my garage is unheated and i have placed heavy duty 3 ft x 4 ft x 3/4 inch rubber matts on the entire floor wall to wall. My garage stays relatively cold and the snow doesn't melt too much either. This doesn't get rid of the moisture however and mats are 50 lbs each and no nylon/felt upper backing so maybe not for your use. You can use and then mop the rubber pas afterwards with a mop...but see below rubber backed felt/nylon pad below might be a much better choice.

With a warm garage i do see an issue, you could try putting down some of some light rubber backed matts, the ones with a course felt material on the upper side. The tough felt material should sop up the excess moisture, and a day after you can move the snow blower and take the rubber backed pad to another warm location to dry. When you use the snow blower once again repeat the process, it's a bit more work however will keep moisture out of the garage and firewood storage area. These types of rubber backed material pads only weight a pound or two....easily moved once the water has melted and captured by the cloth material.

I use a similar rubber backs mats for my wooden floor at the sliding glass door to my backyard for this purpose, and also use it for the front door where people come in out of the snow and place their wet, snowy boots on them so dry.
 

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After blowing, drive blower into garage as usual, BUT park over absorbent throw mat/s, let blower melt/dip over night into absorbent mat/s, next day remove wet mat outside and away from log storage area, store/hang mats outside somewhere dry to air/dip dry over days, reuse as needed.
 

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1979 (or so) Toro 724 (38050) and 2018 Ariens Platinum 24
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I idle my machine down just outside the garage, and while it cools and engine temps stabilize post-work, I give it a full cleaning with a small bristle broom, engage the augurs for a second to remove anything lingering, and then back it into the garage, and it sits on a catch mat, with a couple of pieces of wood keeping the bucket up out of the wet. I have used various large floor mats over the years, but the Ariens mats seem to be the best fit:

 

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With my old Bolens I found that water would pool inside the impeller housing and sit at the bottom where it would freeze into a nice block of hard ice.
I always ensured that none of the 3 impeller blades were facing down to get frozen into the ice, as well as once in a while I would lift the handlebars in order to drain out the water before it would freeze.
I now have a Honda HSS724CTD and I am hoping that I can figure out a way to keep this from happening. I thought about lumber under the tracks so the water would naturally flow out of the bucket.
Haven't figured out a good way yet. I have very little room in my garage during the winter and my snow blower has to be pushed backwards into the garage by lifting from the bucket and stored with the handlebars against the back wall. This way I can store gasoline, generator and such on the floor behind the handlebars. I can put a 240vac heater on the floor in front to melt the snow in the bucket and chute. Still it is difficult to push the blower backwards up onto some lumber in order to tilt the bucket down to drain. As I say, it is a work in progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Or get the wood up off the floor, I don't think the humidity from a melting snowblower in and of itself will ruin it, especially in winter.
Actually Presto Logs will start to fall apart just from humidity. I have about 30 that are left over from last year, and they are getting fuzzy and some are breaking. I should probalby rearrange my wood storage so the presto logs are further from the garage door, but there are other issues with that. (where would I put my electric log splitter)
 
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