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Discussion Starter · #21 ·

One of these plus a 3kW heater. In 15 mins, most of the snow will have melted. Then wheel her in to your garage.

Or build a sauna in your yard, and store your blower in there when wet. Everything wet/icy/snowy gets dried off in our yard sauna.
Unfortunately our sauna is indoors. I use it more for pre and post heating skiis before and after waxing. :LOL:
Sounds like you need a shed .... :)

View attachment 203360
Obsessive comes to mind.:rolleyes:
 

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I keep our garage heated and just above freezing. We have a large car mat that we park on to catch all of the drippings and melted snow from the car when it is parked inside. After I'm done with the snowblower I move the car outside and put the blower on the mat to melt off. If you want to speed up the process you can point a small fan at the blower. I do the same with the snowmobiles. Once everything is melted off, I suck all of the water up with a shop vac and dump it outside.
 

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I store my Cub Cadet in the garage at my ski cabin. The garage is actually used for wood storage and work shop, not cars. I'm trying to figure out how to get most of the snow off the snowblower when I bring it in, to keep from having a large puddle on the floor. Most of the time our snow is pretty dense and often near freezing so it sticks to the blades and housing. I store Northern Idaho Energy Logs (AKA Presto Logs) in the garage, and they do not like damp conditions at all.

Any one have suggestions about getting a snowblower dry, without spending hours with a heat gun, air hose or towels?
IMO the only way getting a snowblower dry is to park it in a heated garage which is what i do. First off I clean what I can outside with a broom/car brush then tilt the front on a board over my drain in the garage. By the time I change then drink a coffee (45 min) I wipe it down with a towel. Ready for the next cleaning.
 

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With my old Bolens I found that water would pool inside the impeller housing and sit at the bottom where it would freeze into a nice block of hard ice.
I always ensured that none of the 3 impeller blades were facing down to get frozen into the ice, as well as once in a while I would lift the handlebars in order to drain out the water before it would freeze.
I now have a Honda HSS724CTD and I am hoping that I can figure out a way to keep this from happening. I thought about lumber under the tracks so the water would naturally flow out of the bucket.
Haven't figured out a good way yet. I have very little room in my garage during the winter and my snow blower has to be pushed backwards into the garage by lifting from the bucket and stored with the handlebars against the back wall. This way I can store gasoline, generator and such on the floor behind the handlebars. I can put a 240vac heater on the floor in front to melt the snow in the bucket and chute. Still it is difficult to push the blower backwards up onto some lumber in order to tilt the bucket down to drain. As I say, it is a work in progress.
My HSS928 has a drain hole in the bottom of the fan drum. If you leave the machine on a slight lean to the back the water will simply drain out of the hole. If the 724 doesn't have one, it might be a good idea to add it.
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Sorry Oneacer I didn't read your reply until after I posted this.
 

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I installed a frost free hot/cold water spigot on the driveway. I use one of those self retracting hoses with a quick disconnect for winter duty. I blow out a small area next to the driveway and rinse any snow and ice away with warm water. I put it in the garage with the hose and leave them to dry off for next time. It was well worth the effort.
 

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I have the opposite issue in my heated garage. In the wintertime the humidity can drop as low as 23% so I leave all of the snow in the blower and when it melts it adds much needed moisture back into the air. A lot of the moisture in a garage comes from moisture seeping through the concrete floor. When I built my garage, I placed 6 inches of gravel, 2" of Styrofoam, and a vapor barrier under the concrete to eliminate this issue. If your concrete floor is sitting on soil, simply store your wood logs up and away from the floor by a couple of feet and it should help considerably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I have the opposite issue in my heated garage. In the wintertime the humidity can drop as low as 23% so I leave all of the snow in the blower and when it melts it adds much needed moisture back into the air. A lot of the moisture in a garage comes from moisture seeping through the concrete floor. When I built my garage, I placed 6 inches of gravel, 2" of Styrofoam, and a vapor barrier under the concrete to eliminate this issue. If your concrete floor is sitting on soil, simply store your wood logs up and away from the floor by a couple of feet and it should help considerably.
Unfortunately my garage is not really heated, just picks up enough heat from the floor above and the insulation from the snow piled up outside, that it typically stays above 40 F in the winter. The other 1/2 of the basement has the HWH in an insulated closet, and better wall insulation so it stays a few degrees warmer. The higher humidity would not be a problem for split wood, but compressed logs really don't like it. Since we put in a Mini Split, we are burning a lot less wood, and actually keep the house at 62 when we aren't there. (minimum set point on a Mini Split) Our winters aren't usually very cold, though we will occasionally go below 0, low 20s to high 30s are more the norm. We have gotten several ft. of snow since Saturday, with more on the way.:)
 
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