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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

I have an Ariens Compact 24 920021 with an LCT engine (PW6HK18650178EABGIOQUVX59E1M). During the process of getting it ready for summer, I decided to remove the drain bolt on the carb bowl to drain as much gas from the bowl as possible. I had done this at least once before without issue, but this time, I unfortunately got much more than I bargained for and would really appreciate some advice on how to proceed with the problem I created.

After the gas was drained from the bolt, I went to screw the drain bolt back into the bowl and immediately noticed the bolt wouldn't screw all the way back in (even by hand). Upon closer examination, I somehow stripped the threads on the bolt, so it's now as shot as shot can be. I was annoyed to find out the bolt itself is not available to purchase by itself, but instead, I had to purchase the carburetor repair kit (20001441 / 20001184). When I went to screw the replacement bolt in to the bowl, the new bolt again did not go in all the way. The replacement bolt does go in to the replacement bowl without issue. Assuming I have the correct part, which I believe I do, this leads me to believe I also stripped the bowl and will need to replace it, as well.

If the above is correct and the bowl needs to be replaced, how difficult a job am I looking at? Can I get by with just removing the bowl and replacing it with a new bowl and bolt, or once I take off the existing bowl, does it get more complicated than that and I'll need to take off the entire carburetor? That's likely not something I'd be comfortable doing (unless there's a great video that shows how to both remove and reinstall the same one I have), so I'd be looking at hiring someone that can do an onsite repair, as I don't have an easy way to transport the snowblower. When you have a chance, please let me know the complexity and/or what needs to be done to fix this issue once and for all. Thank you!
 

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You should replace the old bowl with the new one. Before you begin, screw the new drain bolt (with it's gasket) securely into the new bowl. Remove the old bowl and look for the black rubber bowl gasket. Your kit should include a new bowl gasket. In my experiences with LCT engines, the bowl gasket is almost like a flimsy rubber band that's easily distorted. It's a wee bit tricky to install the gasket with the carb attached to the engine because you're installing it up into the carb and it might drop out from gravity. It can be done but just make sure the gasket is uniformly seated into into the carb's rim. You shouldn't have to remove the float to do this. Then, gently move the new bowl up into place and slowly screw it in. It's a good idea to position the bowl such that the drain screw is on the outside to make future removal easier. Go carefully and check to make sure the gasket isn't being pinched or moving out of it's rim. You can tighten down the screw once you're confident the gasket is aligned. I'd start up the engine and check for any leaks at the bowl gasket or drain screw gasket.

If the bowl gasket falls out of place before installing the bowl, you can apply a VERY light coat of grease to the gasket to help it stick into place on the carb's rim. Try to avoid doing that unless absolutely necessary. Getting the bowl gasket properly in place and staying in place as you attach the bowl is the only challenge.

Older Tecumseh and Briggs carbs have much more robust carb gaskets but the very thin LCT gaskets are easily distorted when installing the bowl.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You should replace the old bowl with the new one. Before you begin, screw the new drain bolt (with it's gasket) securely into the new bowl. Remove the old bowl and look for the black rubber bowl gasket. Your kit should include a new bowl gasket. In my experiences with LCT engines, the bowl gasket is almost like a flimsy rubber band that's easily distorted. It's a wee bit tricky to install the gasket with the carb attached to the engine because you're installing it up into the carb and it might drop out from gravity. It can be done but just make sure the gasket is uniformly seated into into the carb's rim. You shouldn't have to remove the float to do this. Then, gently move the new bowl up into place and slowly screw it in. It's a good idea to position the bowl such that the drain screw is on the outside to make future removal easier. Go carefully and check to make sure the gasket isn't being pinched or moving out of it's rim. You can tighten down the screw once you're confident the gasket is aligned. I'd start up the engine and check for any leaks at the bowl gasket or drain screw gasket.

If the bowl gasket falls out of place before installing the bowl, you can apply a VERY light coat of grease to the gasket to help it stick into place on the carb's rim. Try to avoid doing that unless absolutely necessary. Getting the bowl gasket properly in place and staying in place as you attach the bowl is the only challenge.

Older Tecumseh and Briggs carbs have much more robust carb gaskets but the very thin LCT gaskets are easily distorted when installing the bowl.
That's very helpful - thanks so much. I'll give it a try.
 

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Good explanation Rod330. Those carb gaskets are annoyingly tricky to install properly. I have used a dab of grease to hold in place on the carb bowl too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, the replacement is done, and it went reasonably well (I think). I definitely agree the gasket above the bowl is tricky to get to stay, but I believe I got it. I did make one mistake in overtightening both bolts and crushed the gaskets in the process. I figured you'd want them as tight as possible to avoid leaking, but I see that's not the case. Fortunately, I had the old gaskets to use, and I don't believe I tightened the bolts so much that I crushed them the second time around.

I am very curious if everything is OK (i.e. nothing will leak when starting it), but I didn't plan on adding gas until at least fall (hence loosening the drain bolt the caused this issue in the first place to drain as much gas as I could). I do have ethanol free gas for my mower, but I'm not sure if that will stay good long enough until if and when I need to use the snowblower in the winter. Thanks again for everyone's help.
 

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Well, the replacement is done, and it went reasonably well (I think). I definitely agree the gasket above the bowl is tricky to get to stay, but I believe I got it. I did make one mistake in overtightening both bolts and crushed the gaskets in the process. I figured you'd want them as tight as possible to avoid leaking, but I see that's not the case. Fortunately, I had the old gaskets to use, and I don't believe I tightened the bolts so much that I crushed them the second time around.

I am very curious if everything is OK (i.e. nothing will leak when starting it), but I didn't plan on adding gas until at least fall (hence loosening the drain bolt the caused this issue in the first place to drain as much gas as I could). I do have ethanol free gas for my mower, but I'm not sure if that will stay good long enough until if and when I need to use the snowblower in the winter. Thanks again for everyone's help.
in the future , use petroleum jelly to hold gasket in place. just a dab will do ya.

i use Ethanol free gas and gas stabilizer . Start engine turn off gas and let it run until it stalls. Should be good to go for first snow.
 

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I do have ethanol free gas for my mower, but I'm not sure if that will stay good long enough until if and when I need to use the snowblower in the winter. Thanks again for everyone's help.
I'd put the fuel in it now to make sure it doesn't still leak. But absolutely HATE having to work on machinery when it's cold outside. As mentioned, if it doesn't leak turn off the fuel valve, let the engine run until it quits for lack of fuel, and you can let it go from there. I would also remove the drain bolt to let the remaining fuel out but if you are absolutely certain that you're going to use it next winter you can skip that part.

It's just that around here I may or may not need to use the snowblower this year and it could be sitting for several years, so I drain everything in the fuel system dry at end of season.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I do have ethanol free gas for my mower, but I'm not sure if that will stay good long enough until if and when I need to use the snowblower in the winter. Thanks again for everyone's help.
I'd put the fuel in it now to make sure it doesn't still leak. But absolutely HATE having to work on machinery when it's cold outside. As mentioned, if it doesn't leak turn off the fuel valve, let the engine run until it quits for lack of fuel, and you can let it go from there. I would also remove the drain bolt to let the remaining fuel out but if you are absolutely certain that you're going to use it next winter you can skip that part.

It's just that around here I may or may not need to use the snowblower this year and it could be sitting for several years, so I drain everything in the fuel system dry at end of season.
Thanks - I'll probably do that to be sure. One question based on something you said: if I do decide to remove the drain bolt because I can't be certain I'll use it this winter (I'm relatively confident but obviously I can't be 100%), will removing the drain bolt also get rid of the gas in the fuel tank, or will that just get what's in the carburetor and the fuel tank will need to be siphoned separately?
 

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Well, if you remove the drain bolt from the carburetor to drain the fuel from the bowl, you should also have turned off the fuel valve from the fuel tank to the carburetor. Otherwise then yes, it would also drain the fuel tank. If there is no fuel valve in the line between the tank and carburetor it is a good idea to install one.
 

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Well, if you remove the drain bolt from the carburetor to drain the fuel from the bowl, you should also have turned off the fuel valve from the fuel tank to the carburetor. Otherwise then yes, it would also drain the fuel tank. If there is no fuel valve in the line between the tank and carburetor it is a good idea to install one.
I do have a fuel shut off valve, and your explanation makes perfect sense. Thanks again.
 

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in the future , use petroleum jelly to hold gasket in place. just a dab will do ya.
Agree on the technique, but I recommend KY Jelly (or something similarly water soluble). Petroleum compounds (including grease or Vaseline) can break down a gasket that itself contains any sort of petroleum component.

Plus... you then have an answer to the joke "What ELSE is KY Jelly good for?" {grin}
 

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Agree on the technique, but I recommend KY Jelly (or something similarly water soluble). Petroleum compounds (including grease or Vaseline) can break down a gasket that itself contains any sort of petroleum component.

Plus... you then have an answer to the joke "What ELSE is KY Jelly good for?" {grin}
okay thanks. good to know. i read about the PT on a small engine forum and was having success using it. I'll switch to KY but my wife will get suspicious maybe.
 

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I've been using Vaseline to lubricate/position o-rings & gaskets for about 55 years... No issues with degradation to date. It will always be my go-to for these uses. In applications where gasoline is present, the Vaseline disappears promptly. In other applications like the o-rings on hose reels, it lasts for several years before requiring replacement, without seeming to impact the life of the Nitrile, Viton or Aflas material at all.
 
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