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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so, I am dismanteling an old seized tec 8hp for fun, and for my own knowledge, one of the 2 pulley set screw is stuck, i put wd40 in in, but it just doesn't want to move, what should I do?
 

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You could try a good penetrant such as Liquid Wrench, Kroil etc. WD40 is not that great of a penetrant.
Apply the penetrant every day for a few days. Give the screw a few good wacks with a hammer using a punch or allen key, or air hammer with a pointed tip if you have one.
 

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Be aware that someone along the line may have had it apart and reinstalled with loctite. Heat is the only way especially if they used the high strength product. I assume it is recessed so heating followef by pb blaster or kroil. Let it sit and penetrate. Also when I worked in electric motor shop sometimes TWO setscrews had been installed with locktite on critical assemblies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Be aware that someone along the line may have had it apart and reinstalled with loctite. Heat is the only way especially if they used the high strength product. I assume it is recessed so heating followef by pb blaster or kroil. Let it sit and penetrate. Also when I worked in electric motor shop sometimes TWO setscrews had been installed with locktite on critical assemblies.
I don't think that is the case, as I was able to remove one with wd40 only, no heat
 

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Don't forget to have a good impact (screw) driver in your war-tools chest. With a good set of impact-rated hex drivers. Sometimes the combination of the sharp impact from the hammer and the sharp twist from the driver are enough to break loose some stubborn fasteners. I think I've had my 1970's vintage Snap-On driver kit since it was new. A bit spendy at the time, but it's certainly paid for itself many times over in the decades since.

 

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A gex bit in an impact driver may work.
 

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I invested in a $50 MAPP gas torch back in 2004 when I had to replace the rear calipers of the car I was driving at the time; the brake line fittings were pretty crusty and would not loosen even with the proper brake line wrench. I was able to loosen the brake lines on both calipers with the torch, so it basically paid for itself the first time I used it (it has since paid for itself many times over).

You will not regret the purchase.
 

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so it basically paid for itself the first time I used it (it has since paid for itself many times over).
Over the years, when faced with these problems and knowing a tool I did not own would solve the problem, I went ahead and invested in a good version of that tool. Buy a cheap one, and you will usually have to replace it. It's funny how these 'one time use' tools get used again when you are in a pinch. This is especially true for the commonly used stuff. How many guys here do not own a torch?*

As you said, the first time pays for the tool, from then on its gravy.

*Over the years I've thrown away a number of propane torches - picked up at house sales, or flea markets. Finally settled on an air acetylene Turbo Torch with several tips (mostly for plumbing use). I use that way more often than my oxy acetylene rig.
 

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I agree with Wrenching, look on Craigslist or Facebook and you can buy a used plumber's torch and B tank, acetylene gas, for the same price or a little more than a new MAPP, it's hotter and 1/20th the gas cost, hotter, still portable, more versatile. I have propane, MAPP, B tank, and oxy-acetylene. I use the B tank the most.
 
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