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Discussion Starter #1
does tecumseh make thier own carbs for their engines?

or is it a different manufacturer?....if so, who?

anybody know the part number/model number for an entire carb on a HMSK105 engine?
 

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It depends, I know there is a Walbro on my mower with B&S produced engine, but the enigine block is cast with both Toro icon and the carb has B&S icons but it's a Walbro built to Toro specs(that's of course NLA). Sometimes (mostly in the past), I think Toro and other big manufacturer's engineers would design an engine based on proven technology, and I think they'd contract with one of the engine manufacturers to produce their exclusive design. I think most of this has gone away with American industry and they no longer bother. Perhaps if it's a Taiwan or Japanese product they might. Perhaps a real Toro guy would know more about what they do. If it's Tecumeh, You should inspect it and if usable, try and clean it if it's one of the older adjustable carbs, If not you may try a $15 chinese carb but examine the pics carefully and see if the design is the same (not similar, the same ) and perhaps your linkage parts may fit on the new carb.
To determine the exact carb, you're going to need to supply the Model and Serial number usually located on the fan shroud.
 

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#632334
 
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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the replies,

i was going to take my carb apart and rebuild it, i priced a rebuild kit at about $15-20, then i saw entire carbs for the same price, which im assuming are aftermarket "cheaper versions"

so im trying to decide what to do, replace or rebuild,

im assuming these aftermarket carbs are probably not as good quality as my original carb is, so it might be worth it to rebuild my carb, even though the cost is the same, i will end up with a better product in the end,

is my thinking correct??
 

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I usually try to rebuild the carbs, but I have time to do so. I check the carb carefully, including, pitting, rusting, etc, and for wear on the throttle and choke shafts, and if good, then clean well and order the kit. Many on this site get aftermarket carbs, and have had good luck. I think a few will reply with the sellers that they've done well with. Just check the pics well to make sure the inlet fittings, choke lever, etc line up properly.

tx
 
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Also check for the choke lever spring position(drilled into the carb body) if replacing....With a kit you get the plugs which could aid in cleaning a problem carb more thoroughly. Check for aluminum corrosion in the float chamber above the fuel level. If it's serious then you may want to replace the whole thing. If it's sit without fuel and only the bowl is mucked then you may want to chem dip the body and clear the tiny passages with wire and then air.
 

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I just ordered 2 of the carbs mentioned, $9.50 each, with primer hose & bulb +$1.
 
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what do you mean by this?

you buy an aftermarket carb, and then put all the parts from it into your old carbs body??
Basically yes, but just the parts I need, with this option you do not get the plugs(that need to be destroyed to get at the small passages), but what you do get is a backup carb should the original carb not be successful, a backup attempt can be made. Sometimes you can test the original carb with compressed air to see if the passages are still clear, In which case it can usually be rebuilt without removing the plugs. Another thing to pay attention to is the float chamber venting passage. When they sit, atmospheric moisture can collect and corrode the unseen top of steel chamber plug and interfere with chamber venting. I've made them work even if there is some corrosion there (without removing that plug), but I use chem dip and narrow wire to insure everything is breathing properly. The problem with that shortcut is that it is just a quick fix and the plugs really should be removed and replaced becuse they will continue to produce corrosion that finds it's way to the bottom of the float bowl and can disable the carb again. But, if you need it running TODAY, and likely the rest of the season as well, it can work.
 

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whats wrong with the carb that you think it needs a rebuild or replace? as long as they don't leak and needle/seat work as they should i just leave them alone. no point messing with it if it is all working as it should. if you do order a carb i would also suggest an adjustable one like Jlawrence suggested. that way you can actually tune it if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
whats wrong with the carb that you think it needs a rebuild or replace?
nothing actually,

i just bought this blower this summer, so i am just going over it with a fine tooth comb so to speak, inspecting everything and replacing small parts as nessessary, i am a bit OCD in that way, i like to make sure everything is in good working order before the snow hits, i dont want to have to be repairing something in the middle of winter, i would rather replace small items BEFORE they break down,

so far i have taken apart the auger gear box to inspect it, it was in decent condition with the exception of one bushing, so i cleaned the "clams" and gear, replaced the bushing, reassembled it with new "00" grease, i also replaced the auger shaft bearing while i was in there,

i also replaced the drive and auger belts which were cracked and worn,

next i inspected the drive train, i replaced the rubber drive wheel, as it looked fairly worn and a bit cracked,

so now i feel the "body" of the blower is in perfect working condition, i am moving onto the engine,

i plan on removing the carb and disassembling it to clean it and inspect it, then i will decide what is nessessary to rebuild (if anything at all) maybe all i will end up doing is cleaning it out, we will see,

i want this blower to be reliable, and last a long time, and i feel it should after all this work

after the carb i am pretty much done, i might throw a new spark plug in it also
 

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Jerryvvv, i am with youb100%. The first thing that I do when i buy something used is to take it apart. I figure i eant to see how it should be when it is working, as opposed to trying to figure out how it should be when it is broken. Wife thinks I'm nuts, and she is probably right , but hard to argue with success.
 

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The first thing that I do when i buy something used is to take it apart. I figure i want to see how it should be when it is working, as opposed to trying to figure out how it should be when it is broken.
Good idea.
You have to know how something works, before you can figure out why it doesn't . :geek:
 
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Discussion Starter #16
i took my carb apart and inspected it....it looks a bit rough in some spots, and some of the linkages,

money isn't really an issue for me right now, so i think i am just going to spend the $20 bucks and replace the carb, so i don't have to worry about it,

a follow up question......

do you guys think it would be better to use the main jet out of my old carb in the new carb?
 

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Keep everything together, only swap if you have a problem.
 
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Keep everything together, only swap if you have a problem.
He's probably going to need the new bowl and gaskets at minimum...If the needle and seat are working in the old one, keep them together. If it were myself I'd also use the new float and shafts. Most important is to clean and wire the passages and body thoroughly, see if air passes without obstruction. (Again if there is alu corrosion problems you may just want to use the new carb, use pure gasoline)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
He's probably going to need the new bowl and gaskets at minimum...If the needle and seat are working in the old one, keep them together. If it were myself I'd also use the new float and shafts. Most important is to clean and wire the passages and body thoroughly, see if air passes without obstruction. (Again if there is alu corrosion problems you may just want to use the new carb, use pure gasoline)
thanks again for the info, but i think you are misunderstanding my question, or maybe i didn't explain well enough......

i am planning on using the new carb that i ordered, body and all

but im thinking about removing only the main jet from it, and installing the main jet from my old carb

so putting my old main jet, in the body of the new carb
 
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