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Discussion Starter #1
So like the title says, as best I can figure my Craftsman Tecumseh engine #143.796132 is an HM80-155370N.

I don't know much about these engines except not to exceed 3600rpm. Anything special I should know about maintenance or any weak spot I should know about? Are they generally durable etc? Thanks fellas!
 

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Use 5 20 synthetic...don't over rev.....and they will last....they are durable enough. and if they fail....there is the Predator!
 

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I would add keep them level. Don't run it with the front auger up in the air and the handles pushed down which some people do with really big drifts.
 
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I try to run my Tecs a little slow. I overfill the oil by 1/2" just in case and change it often. Every time you finish running it, shut off the fuel and let it run the carb dry.
 

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My Tecumseh is almost 50 years old, and it runs great ... used to be my dads Snowblower ... just change the oil and use Stabil in the gas. Never had a bit of a problem with it. It is on a Yardman 7100.

My 2 Ariens were from previous owners. I put a Briggs on one and a Predadtor 212 on the other. I actually like the Predadtor and the Tecumseh over the Briggs, although I got the Briggs with electric start for my wife, but I just pull start it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I try to run my Tecs a little slow. I overfill the oil by 1/2" just in case and change it often. Every time you finish running it, shut off the fuel and let it run the carb dry.
It got an oil change last night. Sticker says 5/20 or 5/30 depending on temp. Machine has not been used all that much and in the 10 yrs I'm in the house. I would say that at least 4 of those years I never fueled it up for the season. The times I did if I only had 5-10 hrs on it the oil stayed. Little worried about acid etching but figured new oils are better at buffering.

Have no idea how old owner treated it although he seemed like a guy who did his maintenance.

With new driveway and impeller mod I want to try to use it more often. Like for those 3-5" snows that I always grabbed my Toro for. Toro is awesome but the 20" cut and lack of real self propel are drawbacks for my largish parking area and moderately sloped drive.

Thinking I'd like to rebuild the carb since the high speed jet acts a little funny. Sometimes it will bog after half way through clearing snow. Give the jet a turn and it snaps back to life. Maybe should just buy new since they're cheap enough.

I like that the carb has a float bowl drain. Running a carb dry simply by running the engine, even with choking and priming as it runs down still leaves some fuel in the bowl so that's something I think all carbs should have nowadays.
 

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If the fuel lines are dried and cracked change them now before you get a fuel leak behind the starter shroud where you can't see it-primer hose,too.

Check all the screws on the carb heat shroud fairly frequently if using the machine regularly-they like to fall out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If the fuel lines are dried and cracked change them now before you get a fuel leak behind the starter shroud where you can't see it-primer hose,too.

Check all the screws on the carb heat shroud fairly frequently if using the machine regularly-they like to fall out.
The machine did lose one shroud bolt sometime in the past. Had the heat shroud off last night and the primer line seems flexible as does the bulb itself. I did not check the fuel line but I ordered a new carb last night and will see what's going on when I change it.

The current carb is just a little balky. The main jet mixture screw is slow to respond to changes especially as you turn it out (rich). Nothing will happen then a minute later it will stumble until you lean it out then it can go the other way.

Also I have throttle up a little slow or it can stall and it sometimes backfires. Had the float bowl off and it was clean but the o-ring for the main jet is crumbling and some of that may have found its way where it don't belong. Also the float bowl gasket is cracked but not leaking gas. I shot some carb cleaner and ran some copper wire through the jet w/o much change.

Next step would be to pull the carb and fully clean and rebuild but that seems to be hit and miss according to what I've read and it's cheap to just buy a new carb.
 

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for the old tecumsehs, check oil b4 starting, change oil yearly because its a good thing todo. theyre almost bullet proof
 

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......

Next step would be to pull the carb and fully clean and rebuild but that seems to be hit and miss according to what I've read and it's cheap to just buy a new carb.
Everyone's free to do as they please,but I'll never understand this new trend of just tossing an original Tecumseh carb and replacing with a Chinese unit.A careful cleaning will often restore them to perfect working order,usually with no parts needing replacement.Plenty of step-by-step guides out there on carb cleaning,that would be my plan.JMHO.
 

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If you have time & willingness to clean it and get it right, that seems good. But if you just need it working, now, I can absolutely understand simply replacing it. Especially if you have limited time available, and don't want to clean & reassemble when you finally have a chance, only to find it's still bad. Maybe you have kids, and can't get to it for a week anyhow, so in the meantime a replacement could have arrived.

And you can certainly swap it, and then also thoroughly clean the original one later, "offline", keeping the machine functional in the meantime.

I'm just glad that there are at least more options available to people. And I am pleasantly surprised to see that some eBay carbs have adjustable jets, which the original Tecumseh carb may not. I recently discovered that I can apparently get an adjustable eBay carb for mine, if I chose, which would be an upgrade in that respect from the OEM carb.
 

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To paraphrase a popular political phrase: It's the oil level, Stupid! There isn't a quicker way to ruin one than letting them get low on oil.

My procedure for keeping any Tecumseh alive survive:

Before the season starts, I always:

Check and or change the oil. Synthetics make it easier to pull start if needed, but it is most important to keep it full. Topping it off with a bit of dino oil is way better than risking running it at the minimum line.

Drain the float bowl [my engine is so equipped] and access whether my fuel system needs service. Hoses, filters, clamps, cap, tank and O-rings.

Make sure my cooling fan can do it's job. Mud dauber and rodent nests must be removed and their occupants evicted.

Wipe the motor off so I can see any fresh leaks.

Don't lay the motor down on the recoil side when I split the tractor. This let's oil run into places it doesn't belong.

Fresh fuel. Don't care if it had stabilizer or not because old stabilized fuel is still old fuel. The stabilizers will make your engine run crappy. I siphon it clean and burn the old stuff in the lawnmower while cleaning up the autumn leaves. Fresh fuel for pre-season test is best.

Check the condition of the spark plug, cap and wire. Also give the kill circuit a once over.

Having done that and gone over the rest of the blower, I start it and run it through it's paces. I rarely adjust the carb until the cold weather arrives.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Everyone's free to do as they please,but I'll never understand this new trend of just tossing an original Tecumseh carb and replacing with a Chinese unit.A careful cleaning will often restore them to perfect working order,usually with no parts needing replacement.Plenty of step-by-step guides out there on carb cleaning,that would be my plan.JMHO.
Not going to toss it but for <$15 shipped I can pop it on and diagnose if I actually have a carb problem. Once it's on the bench I can take a good look and clean it well. Nice to have a spare.
 

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If you have time & willingness to clean it and get it right, that seems good. But if you just need it working, now, I can absolutely understand simply replacing it. Especially if you have limited time available, and don't want to clean & reassemble when you finally have a chance, only to find it's still bad. Maybe you have kids, and can't get to it for a week anyhow, so in the meantime a replacement could have arrived.

And you can certainly swap it, and then also thoroughly clean the original one later, "offline", keeping the machine functional in the meantime.

I'm just glad that there are at least more options available to people. And I am pleasantly surprised to see that some eBay carbs have adjustable jets, which the original Tecumseh carb may not. I recently discovered that I can apparently get an adjustable eBay carb for mine, if I chose, which would be an upgrade in that respect from the OEM carb.
"If you just need it working now, replace . . ."

Seriously?

"Now" does not mean wait a week(s) for the craptastic Chinese part to show, and then the time needed to rig the throttle etc. to it . . .

"Now" means spend the 30 minutes or so to clean the old one. Carbs are not magic, and the older Tecumseh carbs have about 4 moving parts (throttle, choke, float, float needle), one mechanical adjustment (float level), and there is absolutely zero magic involved. Not that someone could not screw up a rebuild (I have known folks that could screw up a sunny day . . . ) but it is one of the simplest tasks I have done in a long time. From the sound of your gaskets, a carb kit would be a good idea, and I always find those in stock locally . . . IE "Now". And unless you short-cut something and don't to a full rebuild/clean, the chance of a problem persisting is minimal. Remember, 4 moving parts! Unless the rest is mangled/deformed/etc. there really isn't much to fail.

Just did this on a 1979 HSK70 that sat likely 20 years with god knows what fuel in it. Shutoff closed, but bowl full . . . . Most godawful green goo I have ever seen in it. Rebuild and new fuel lines (upper was solid with rubber residue - zero flow, as was shutoff valve. New lines and cleaned shutoff, and other than one other issue (that would have been easy to blame on the carb, but wasn't) of the small intermediate manifold between the carb and the block being loose from the block, causing an air leak, it now runs flawlessly and starts on 1 pull in 12 degrees . . . . and back in service likely before the right clone carb could have been found and ordered.

Just another point of view. Good, older, equipment like this was built to be serviced. It's only recent attitudes that have pushed folks into treating everything as disposable . . .
 

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Unless there is something catastrophically wrong with the original carb, I rather take the time to clean it than replace it.
 

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I don't bother cleaning anymore...unless it a carb that I can't get from China. I keep 1/2 dozen of the small and medium block Tec carbs on hand at all times...some adjustable, some not. I haven't gotten a bad one yet.
 

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Everyone's free to do as they please,but I'll never understand this new trend of just tossing an original Tecumseh carb and replacing with a Chinese unit.A careful cleaning will often restore them to perfect working order,usually with no parts needing replacement.Plenty of step-by-step guides out there on carb cleaning,that would be my plan.JMHO.
Depends What Your Time is Worth. I'd rather spend $12 and fix the problem, especially if your engine has a Fixed Jet Carb. Replacing it with an Adjustable Carb Allows You to Dial it in.
 

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Yes time is money in many cases, I usually have a few jobs to do and have to be in bed early so a lot of times a $12 carb is much easier and worth it, I also take the old carbs and clean and fix them to use if needed on the next job. So many times they get used but when someone is waiting right before a storm, I will toss a new one on and deal with cleaning the old one later.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No expert by a long shot but I've cleaned and rebuilt my share of carbs. Never had another Snow King and this one has had limited use by my hands so I don't have a good baseline of performance. Problem with snowblowers is unlike your lawn mower, generator, leaf blower etc, you can't run them under a good load without snow so I'm stuck guessing.

It has operated well but have had the intermittent minor issues described above and I feel like it's a bit off. Since I'm not 100% it's a carb issue I'm using the new one to eliminate it as a variable. So as a $14 diagnostic "tool" this is the right way to go this time, for me.

Plan on going to go through the whole fuel system this weekend.
 
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