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Now this is some snow moving equipment. Yee gawds, watch the force that thing puts into it!

 

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I remember as a kid growing up on a farm, we used to get snow drifts on our roads that would close them off all together too. Nothing as deep as in that video, but the township road commissioner had a big Caterpillar road grader with one of those V shaped plows on the front of it, and he'd have to get a running start at the drifts and "WHOOSH" the snow would fly out in all directions until the grader couldn't go any further. Then he'd back up and do it all over again. Great fun watching as a kid, and still fun as a grown up kid today.:p
 

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Wow, cool video!

Thats the Tug Hill Plateau, in New York State, east side of Lake Ontario.
The winds blow west to east right across the length of the lake and dump huge amounts of Lake Effect snow on that region every winter..Its a fairly lightly populated region, but for the people who do live there, they enjoy an average of 300 inches of snow each winter (25 feet).

Scot
 

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Snow

Funny the reference to snow and farms, I grew up on a farm too. We always hoped to get snowed in - no school, but we had the normal farm chores like milking cows, tending the hogs & chickens etc to still deal with.
Worst I ever remember was the blizzard of 1959, we had a snowdrift that went up to the peak of the house ( a story and a half) due to the wind.
We always cussed the road grader driver when they came through and opened the roads.

Most fun I ever saw was when the Rock Island RR crews came to open the tracks from the deep stuff. Most times it was a flatcar loaded with RR ties for weight and a V-Plow on the front. They used a steam engine in those days just for that, had that flat car on the front of the engine, come running like a bat out of heck and let it go and throw the engine into reverse. The flat car would plow into the snow banks and the snow went flying. If the flat car stayed on the tracks, they'd hook onto it, back up a ways and go at it again. They also had a crew with prybars to put it back on the tracks if it jumped.

Best picture I ever saw was from back in 1936 IIRC, my Grandmother went into labor with my aunt and there was a blizzard. Neighbors cut their fences so my Granddad could get Grandma to town (complications) using horses and a cutter. Anyway the tracks were in deep snow and the RR bought in a steam locomotive with a rotary plow on it on the same day. One person got a picture of it where it was cutting through some of the deeper drifts on the tracks. Doesn't look like they were blowing right then, there was a bunch of guys on top of the snowdrift and you could see the top of the smokestack and top of the cab above the snow, nothing else.
 

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all this milking cows and slopping hogs makes me glad i was a city boy :D
although i do remember being stranded at my grandparents farm a time or two as a kid during the winter. riding the pigs bareback during the summer, see there's a little counry in this boy ;)
 
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