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Yep, it's pretty much end of snow blowing season for me. So I want to make sure I take good care of my recently purchased Pro 32. This was an expensive purchase for me and I hope to keep it in great running condition for years and years. So after much reading and research on the matter, this is what I plan to do:

*Fill tank with 91 octane corn-free fuel and treat with Star Tron (as I do with every tank of fuel anyway.)
*Run engine for a few minutes to distribute treated fuel throughout system.
*Turn off engine
*Turn fuel valve to "off" position
*Top off fuel tank to very top
*Done

I tend to agree with the train of thought that says having fuel in the system is better than trying to run it dry. You'll never truly get it completely drained of all fuel anyway. By having treated fuel in the system hopefully it will prevent seals from drying/rotting etc. And having a steel gas tank, it will also prevent rust from forming. Any one else following this protocol successfully or did you have issues?
 

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That's pretty much how I store all equipment. Just with one additional step: Before shutting the engine off, I turn the fuel valve off and then spray fogging oil into the intake to stall the engine.



For spring startup, it's pull the spark plug, clean and check gap, pull the engine over with the plug out to get any excess fogging oil out of the cylinder, put the plug back in, fuel valve on and fire it up (complete with some smoke as the fogging oil burns off).
 

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I Try to leave the tank about 1/4 full of non oxy fuel. Shut the fuel off. Start her up until she runs the carb dry. Run her about once a month during the off season. Top off the non oxy about half way through the summer with some fresh stuff. I'm not of fan of not running an engine for a long period of time.
 

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There really is no point in turning off the fuel shut off if you turn off the engine first. Do as Gibbsie suggested. Turn shut off off, then run engine till dry. No need to keep fuel in the tank.
 

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I personally keep my HSS stored with a full tank of stabilized non-ethanol gas. I shut the fuel valve and drain the bowl using the tool-less screw on the bottom of the bowl. I tend to move my machine around during the off season once or twice, so I’d rather keep fuel in the tank. It’s easy enough to simply drain the bowl again.
 

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There really is no point in turning off the fuel shut off if you turn off the engine first.
Not the case at all. Turning the fuel valve off ensures that a leak past the carb float valve won't flood the engine with the entire contents of the fuel tank while it's sitting. Anything gravity fed should have the fuel valve turned off after every shutdown for this reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not the case at all. Turning the fuel valve off ensures that a leak past the carb float valve won't flood the engine with the entire contents of the fuel tank while it's sitting. Anything gravity fed should have the fuel valve turned off after every shutdown for this reason.
That’s exactly my thinking too.

How likely are these Briggs steel fuel tanks to rust if left empty say for 8-9 months? That would be my main concern with siphoning it dry.
 

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Aside from doing all the normal end-of-season maintenance I drain the fuel tank, run the engine until it quits, then drain the carburetor bowl and anything left in the fuel lines. The issue here is that some years we don't get any snow at all, or just enough to sweep away with a broom. So it is not uncommon for a snowblower to sit for two or even three years without running it. Even the best fuel preservative is not going to work for that long and I'd end up with a tank, fuel lines and carburetor full of insoluble gunk.

No thank you. And I've never had an issue with rust in the tanks from condensation. Still, this year I'm going to do something different and store the snow blower inside with the generator in the unfinished part of the temperature and humidity controlled basement. I might even spring for the cover for it. Wouldn't want it to get all dusty in the off-season, y'know?:smile2:
 

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That’s exactly my thinking too.

How likely are these Briggs steel fuel tanks to rust if left empty say for 8-9 months? That would be my main concern with siphoning it dry.
I've heard of folks fogging their metal tanks inside with oil, though I cannot say I have done it myself.
 
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Again, there is no point in shutting off the fuel shut off valve if you shut off the engine FIRST. So- turn off the fuel shut off FIRST- WHILE the engine is running- let the engine burn thru the fuel that is left in the line, then when it dies, you can pull off the carb bowl (or press the little drain button on there if it has one) if you would like to drain out the remaining fuel. I don't usually drain the carb bowl because it is treated gasoline (Stabil-360 mixed with some seafoam for end of season cleaning)


As for that leaking past the carb/gravity fed crap- if it is getting past the carb, you've got a float problem and you want to know about it and get it fixed soon.
 

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Fuel additives have come a long way since 1955. I believe a lot of information on petrol characteristics that we're reading is based upon old knowledge. I think people should consider what exactly are enemies to a fuel system. 1) dirty fuel. Who inspects the inside, bottom of the fuel can at each refilling ? What about the fuel nozzle ? Inside and out, how clean is that ? 2) Oxygen - rust and varnish love it. If a fuel tank is filled to its maximum, the air is displaced offering little opportunity for condensation to develop. The addition of store bought fuel additives is good insurance to keep the varnish at bay

I stand with those who add stabilizer, fill the tank to its maximum and then start engine 3 or 4 times a year during the off season.

My service manual says to add a few ozs of oil to the top of piston in preparation for storage. I did it twice but I can't do it anymore. That oil does not burn off completely at startup or at running. It seems to me that all it did for me was to coat the sparkplug and the top of the piston with carbon.

I'm no engineer. I'm speaking of my experiences only. I own 2 strong running blowers. A 20 yr old and a 15 yr old. They start well, usually on the first pull. They start better than I do.
 

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Yep, it's pretty much end of snow blowing season for me. So I want to make sure I take good care of my recently purchased Pro 32. This was an expensive purchase for me and I hope to keep it in great running condition for years and years. So after much reading and research on the matter, this is what I plan to do:

*Fill tank with 91 octane corn-free fuel and treat with Star Tron (as I do with every tank of fuel anyway.)
*Run engine for a few minutes to distribute treated fuel throughout system.
*Turn off engine
*Turn fuel valve to "off" position
*Top off fuel tank to very top
*Done

I tend to agree with the train of thought that says having fuel in the system is better than trying to run it dry. You'll never truly get it completely drained of all fuel anyway. By having treated fuel in the system hopefully it will prevent seals from drying/rotting etc. And having a steel gas tank, it will also prevent rust from forming. Any one else following this protocol successfully or did you have issues?
I think your system is totally fine..I would say go with that, no need to consider anything else.

People have different systems that work for them:
drain the tank, don't drain the tank.
drain the carb, don't drain the carb.
turn off the fuel valve, dont turn off the fuel valve..etc.

All are subjective, none are definitively right or wrong.
I also use your system..treated non-ethanol gas is fine for my snowblowers for 7 months of storage, and fine for my mowers for 5 months of storage.

The only thing I do differently is dont fill the gas tank to the top, I only leave it about 1/4 to 1/2 full, (basically whatever was left in there when the season ended.) For the snowblowers, that sit 7 to 8 months between uses, I drain the gas and add fresh for the start of the new season.

Scot
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I appreciate all the replies, they have been very helpful. One thing mentioned was that some like to run the engine periodically in the off season. I generally don't do that for any equipment I own unless I plan to use it. The reason is that unless you get the engine good and hot at full operating temps, you will get condensation in the oil that won't burn off. That's what that white milky gunk is on the oil dipstick tube. I figure it causes more harm than good.
 

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I'm in the "fill the tank with non-ethanol fuel" camp, treat with stabilizer, shut off the fuel valve and charge the battery before storage.
 
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One of the biggest problems of leaving fuel in the carb during storage is that it keeps the needle in full contact with the seat usually with a small amount of pressure behind it , and it is this full contact that can ruin or damage certain needles and seats under prolonged seated contact.
The other problem is that the carb is not closed air tight and allows for gas vapor to escape over time reducing the the gas to a point that it is almost junk, even if it is treated with stabil or similar additive , these additives are for vapor captured or capped tanks and cans, and does not prevent fuel that can vapor out from becoming bad, as well there is such a small amount of fuel in the float bowl it takes it even less time to go bad.
I shut the fuel off while running let it die, and pull the float bowl wipe it clean, leave the fuel in the tank treated with stabil and and store it out of weather and direct sunlight.
The only other thing I do is take 2 wine bottle corks and use a little tape on them to make them fit the exhaust discharge so that they are blocked and then take a large heavy trash bag and put it over the engine and tie it as tight as possible around the engine base even putting bungee rope to hold secure.
This I do so I know that critters cannot get in without showing they did so, and as well we have a few different varieties of mud dobbers or some call mud wasp that will plug any hole it can with a dirt nest and this includes carburetors, even indoors in the nicest buildings and garages.
 
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