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I don't remember the tire size off the top of my head but I'd like to get or make some tire chains for my snow thrower. Where does everyone get theirs from? Average prices? Cheaper to make them possibly?

Thanks for any info in advance.
 

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I notice a lot of the used snowblower dudes often have used chains for a much better price. New chains aren't cheap.
They often will have some better new tech tires available too.
 

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Cheaper to make them possibly?
Probably not. One problem is that the cross chains are hardened and that is not a commonly stocked item. If you could find a place to order it, you would probably be required to buy the whole roll. Then you need the cross chain end links, 2 for each cross chain. That adds up quick. Then the side chain and some quick links... Doubtful that you will come out saving any money. Even if you bought pre-made cross chains like these https://tinyurl.com/y7apdjaj you would probably need to cut them down. So you will need at least an angle grinder or bolt cutter and a vice to crimp the end links. Takes some time and may not be worth it to you

Now I'm not saying it can't be done. In fact, I did so just a couple of weekends ago using very old automotive cross chains I bought of ebay years ago. If I remember right, I paid $12 for 2 boxes of 50 cross chains from an old auto parts buyout.





 

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I was going to offer to sell you a used set cheap but even at $10 plus shipping, you would better off just buying a set off the internet. I see a site that sells most snowblower sizes for $21-$28 with free shipping. No way you can beat that unless you you find a set on craigslist locally and pick them up without paying shipping.
 

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I put the Sno-Hog tires on all my machines, never looked back ...no more rocking, bumping, shaking the machine apart anymore.
Just wondering if you have inclined/steep areas to work your machine? The Sno Hog nobby tread vs the Xtrac deep lug tread? Any commen?
 

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Just wondering if you have inclined/steep areas to work your machine? The Sno Hog nobby tread vs the Xtrac deep lug tread? Any commen?
Snow Hog was no good for me at the end of my driveway where it sloped a little. It only work if you have a heavy snowblower and large wheelbase. Chain is a must. Don't wait to install it. People even put chains on Xtrac, but that kinda defeat the purpose of Xtrac. Poly skid shoe is another improvement.
 

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Meh, personally I think chains make the snowblower way to jumpy/bumpy. Instead I just installed a bunch of sheet metal screws in the lugs and get awesome traction with a smooth ride. They also make other ice screws for things like atvs and snowmobiles but when 100 screws are $5 or so vs double digit for others, I'll stick with sheet metal ones. I used them in Anchorage for four years and barely work 1/4 off the screw head. My driveway here in Colorado is hardly sloped and the snowplows never leave enough of a windrow for me to need studded tires so I removed them.
 

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Years ago I put the Snow Hogs on my machines before the XTrac were a thing. I personally think the XTrac perform better than the Snow Hogs, which do perform well also.

Now all my machines (7) have the XTrac, and even the machines with Snow Hogs on them are being converted over to XTrac as they wear out, … which 2 of those already wore out the Snow Hogs, as I used to do driveways for money years ago ….

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Meh, personally I think chains make the snowblower way to jumpy/bumpy. Instead I just installed a bunch of sheet metal screws in the lugs and get awesome traction with a smooth ride. They also make other ice screws for things like atvs and snowmobiles but when 100 screws are $5 or so vs double digit for others, I'll stick with sheet metal ones. I used them in Anchorage for four years and barely work 1/4 off the screw head. My driveway here in Colorado is hardly sloped and the snowplows never leave enough of a windrow for me to need studded tires so I removed them.
When I first used chain, I was shocked at how jumpy/bumpy my snowblower was. On snow though, it was surprisingly smooth and give excellent traction. If you think about it, that jumpy/bounding/hammering action is what helped the chain bite into the snow. It even work on ice. There is no going back using tire snow screws/studs. If one fall out, your car might run over it. I also don't like their sharp edges/teeth on pavements. Xtrac is my first option, if it works.
 

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Years ago I put the Snow Hogs on my machines before the XTrac were a thing. I personally think the XTrac perform better than the Snow Hogs, which do perform well also.

Now all my machines (7) have the XTrac, and even the machines with Snow Hogs on them are being converted over to XTrac as they wear out, … which 2 of those already wore out the Snow Hogs, as I used to do driveways for money years ago ….

View attachment 167483 View attachment 167484
Older Ariens have axles closer to the front, so they have more weights on the wheels, but less weights on the buckets. Xtrac make those snowblowers more appealing. At least, for the people that know about snowblower. Don't know if you would get your money back for them, though.
 

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When I first used chain, I was shocked at how jumpy/bumpy my snowblower was. On snow though, it was surprisingly smooth and give excellent traction. If you think about it, that jumpy/bounding/hammering action is what helped the chain bite into the snow. It even work on ice. There is no going back using tire snow screws/studs. If one fall out, your car might run over it. I also don't like their sharp edges/teeth on pavements. Xtrac is my first option, if it works.
What do you mean "no going back"? Common sense dictates you don't use screws so long that they puncture the inner casing of the tire so the tire is perfectly fine and you can remove them any time with absolutely no issue. The screws can scratch pavement if you spin but you're much less likely to spin as you have traction, and once the ridges wear off they are basically 1/4" hexagons of steel (if you use 1/4" hex head and not 5/16" of course). Mine has toro tires that look like this except they are pinned (winter tire speak for holes already formed in the tread where studs would get inserted) with two holes per lug. They are a fairly hard tire and probably circa 1980 (when snowblower was new) as they are fairly weatherchecked. I had the screws and I used to do the same thing with my dirtbike tires as a kid when I wanted to ride on ice. Works great and is a proven thing for traction so instead of buying new tires and tubes I used less than $5 in screws.

The only way you are going to pull a screw out is if you are sitting and spinning and then maybe eventually you'll pull one out. Not likely as you're going to have much better traction, that is if you pick a screw that is perhaps 1/8" to 1/4" shy of puncturing the tire, basically get a screw that is as long as the lug is tall.
 

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Chain is easy to install and remove whenever that you want. Screws/studs put holes on the tire treads permanently, so there is no going back after that. Whatever that gives traction and work for you. Those wheels are at the end of their lives anyway, so it would be fun to screw them up a little.
 
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