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Hey guys, need some advice.

I got in new tires and tubes for my Ariens 20" compact snow-blower (model 922006 / 922003). The tire size is 410-4 (4.10-3.50 x 4) on this unit.

I obviously need to re-inflate the new tires to some kind of pressure.

The max PSI on the tires says 24 PSI.

I looked in my manual, and I don't see any reference to tire pressure in there.

So... I need you guy's opinion on what I should do. I've read on some forums that people like to run them low at about 8-12 PSI, and I've heard some people like to run them higher, up in the 20-25 PSI range.

What do you guys do? Any help / advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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i like to run my un-chained tires at 10-12 psi ,.... i bought a tractor tire pressure guage so i could keep the psi accurate ( OCD).
i keep my chained tires at the max rated psi tho to keep the chains somewhat tight on the tires.
thats just what i do, im sure there are many different thoughts on this subject !
 

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14-15psi called for on my machines.
 

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Just like in a vehicle, tire can get better grip when deflated in mud and snow. (By delflated I mean anything under recommended psi.) more machines have rounded tires and being deflated allows more tread to grab. I don't use chains so I can't give opinion on that.


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Just like in a vehicle, tire can get better grip when deflated in mud and snow. (By delflated I mean anything under recommended psi.) more machines have rounded tires and being deflated allows more tread to grab. I don't use chains so I can't give opinion on that.


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All of the 1970's Ariens wheels I have seen do not indicate any PSI on the side of the tire.
The Ariens 1971 10,000 series manual says 10 to 12 psi.
im sure the 22,000 series of the same era used the same tires.

Since you know the max rating on your new tires is 24 psi, I would go just under that...
you could safely choose anywhere between 10 and 20 psi and be fine..
the difference will be how firm or soft you want the tires to be..
I would go slightly on the softer side, which will put the most tread in contact with the driveway..
For these tires, 15 psi is probably just about right.

Scot
 

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I have the same size as yours and found as my snow hogs got older that less pressure does give better grip, I was at 20 psi now I run 13-15. They are also going into their 21 season and will be replacing them next summer.
 

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i like to run my un-chained tires at 10-12 psi ,.... i bought a tractor tire pressure guage so i could keep the psi accurate ( OCD).
i keep my chained tires at the max rated psi tho to keep the chains somewhat tight on the tires.
thats just what i do, im sure there are many different thoughts on this subject !
Wait, why is a tractor pressure gauge necessary?

I ask because yesterday I tried checking tire pressure on my troy-bilt. I used one of those accutire electronic gauges, but it didn't read a pressure rating. Furthermore, no air was coming out when I pressed on the needle with the gauge.

At first I thought the tire was deflated, but the tire looks like it is inflated (ie. it's not flat).

I am wondering: do these knobby tires hold their shape even without air? I am worried that the pressure gauge is broken and when I do try to add air to the tires they will explode. (The gauge works on my car tires just fine)
 

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I have that exact tire in the SnowHog, cute little thing, my little Bolens, that I just got for free.

I run appx 20 lbs. in it, ran it the last storm, everything worked beautifully.

No matter what pressure, just make sure not to overinflate, or make them so soft you can squash them with your hand, and that both sides are at the same pressure.

@Helish,

I have seen tires that small, and of considerable age, tend to develop into a hardened state, thus resembling a filled air state, just sitting there under no stress or tension. You still want them inflated properly in a working environment though.


JMHO
 

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Wait, why is a tractor pressure gauge necessary?

I ask because yesterday I tried checking tire pressure on my troy-bilt. I used one of those accutire electronic gauges, but it didn't read a pressure rating. Furthermore, no air was coming out when I pressed on the needle with the gauge.

At first I thought the tire was deflated, but the tire looks like it is inflated (ie. it's not flat).

I am wondering: do these knobby tires hold their shape even without air? I am worried that the pressure gauge is broken and when I do try to add air to the tires they will explode. (The gauge works on my car tires just fine)
a tractor gauge may not be necessary with todays fancy electronic everything, but i find it much easier to keep low pressure tires evenly inflated with a gauge specifically made for that purpose.
 

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Hey guys, need some advice.

I got in new tires and tubes for my Ariens 20" compact snow-blower (model 922006 / 922003). The tire size is 410-4 (4.10-3.50 x 4) on this unit.

I obviously need to re-inflate the new tires to some kind of pressure.

The max PSI on the tires says 24 PSI.

I looked in my manual, and I don't see any reference to tire pressure in there.

So... I need you guy's opinion on what I should do. I've read on some forums that people like to run them low at about 8-12 PSI, and I've heard some people like to run them higher, up in the 20-25 PSI range.

What do you guys do? Any help / advice would be greatly appreciated!
i run mine at 10psi
 
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