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Discussion Starter #1
Before I go out and by a tube for the little pneumatic tubeless SnowHogs on my recently acquired Bolens 21 inch machine, I was wondering if anyone here has had any luck/success with putting in the green bottle stuff, Slime, on a tire that is weeping/leaking through the side wall (i.e. checking from age).
 

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Before I go out and by a tube for the little pneumatic tubeless SnowHogs on my recently acquired Bolens 21 inch machine, I was wondering if anyone here has had any luck/success with putting in the green bottle stuff, Slime, on a tire that is weeping/leaking through the side wall (i.e. checking from age).
I have Slimed the trailer tires for my catamaran and they still leak a bit at the rims, but the sidewall/tread areas appear to be solid. Over-inflate the tires by about 50% and turn them every-which-way for about 1/2 hour and bounce them off the garage floor to get the Slime everywhere on the rubber inside.
 

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I use it on ALL my small tires and most work well, only ones I’ve had issues with was badly dry rotted but I’ve actually removed a ripped tube, put in a stem and sealed the bead, added slime and the tire is still holding air, Sister in law now has that blower and she has never added air and was still good when I prepped it for winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, there SnowHogs, good tread, very small, 9x3.50-4 ,( i.e. 4.10-4 ) …. Those are the pup tires … :)

I'm going to try Slime before I take them off the rims … If I have to dis-mount them, I am just going to get a pair of new ones, as a pair new is only 35.88 w/ free shipping on Amazon.

I have always been curious about that Slime stuff anyways ….
 

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If you tube those tires instead you'll get more mileage out of them. Dry rot will quit working with slime and can be very messy when you go the new route afterwards. Tube 'em and the tire won't lose anymore air.
 

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I've changed about 1000 motorcycle tires and a couple of snowblower tires. The problem I've seen with SLIME after it's left in a wheel for a extended period of time is it creates a lot of rust inside the wheel, on aluminum wheels it corrodes them. Think about, your putting something wet inside the wheel, I don't know if it freezes or not. My advice, at $36 for a new pair, would be to replace the tires and not have to worry about them when the winter storms hit.
 

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I mtn bike, have been a tubeless fanboy for decades.
Both the green Slime & Stan's NoTubes works. If not then you're not using enough. Trust me, the stuff will seal.
 

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Only my very humble opinion but I wouldn't use Slime in anything. Either bite the bullet and spring for new tires or tube the old ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, the tubes are only 2.99 at harbor freight, … and I have never used Slime before as per the posted reasons, and being the broad area of the sidewall, looks like tube it is.

And if I have to, ill just get new ones. I'll save trying Slime for another day.
 

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Yeah, the tubes are only 2.99 at harbor freight, … and I have never used Slime before as per the posted reasons, and being the broad area of the sidewall, looks like tube it is.

And if I have to, ill just get new ones. I'll save trying Slime for another day.

Many tire dealers and OPE repair companies in my area will not work on tire and wheels that have been slimed and I can't really blame them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
@micah,

Very true, and I could imagine why. But on the other hand, I could see where it might get someone out of a quick bind, but all your really doing is delaying the inevitable, which is fix the issue permanently.
 

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Best bet is to break the beads on both inner and outer. Scrub the rims with a wire brush, then wipe them clean. Pull the valve cores out of the tires and over inflate to reseat the beads, then disconnect the air supply, and screw the cores back into the stems. Should solve nearly all bead leak problems--if that doesn't do the trick, then go the Slime route. I've only had to use it once, then ended up replacing the tire in less than 6 months. Good luck.
 

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The "Slime" for "Tubeless" tires is finely ground chopped up rubber bits mixed with a "Anti-Freeze" type solution, like glycerin/water that helps to "Clog" a puncture hole, and the glycerin helps to condition and make "Sticky" the rubber particles when they start to exit the puncture hole.
Dry Rotted side-walls, sometimes it helps if you have enough in it to clog the spots where the air leaks, but it doesn't work all the time.
Usually you are better off to either install an inner-tube, or replace the tire.
The water mixture in the slime will corrode a steel or aluminum rim after it is in it for a while, and it does make a mess when you have to dis-mount the tire if there is a lot in it, plus the "Slime" only stays good for a certain amount of time, maybe up to 2 years, then it begins to "Clump-up" like little rubber balls inside the tire and won't work to seal a leak once that happens.
 

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I've had great success using liquid laundry starch to seal up side wall cracks. Put it in the tire just like slime, but the starch is cheap enough you can fill the tire with it if you want. It really only needs enough in the tire to cover the leak every time it rolls around. The starch does freeze. So, I mix it with an equal amount of antifreeze.

www.mytractorforum.com-laundry-starch-tubeless-tires
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Just grabbed the tubes from Harbor Freight, 3 bucks …. pulled the tubeless valve, refresh rim, put in tube … brand new again..... :)
 

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Just grabbed the tubes from Harbor Freight, 3 bucks …. pulled the tubeless valve, refresh rim, put in tube … brand new again..... :)

Ya done real good. Now no more worries.




"If you don't have time to repair it right the first time when will you ever find the time to do it correctly the second time?"
I remember our mechanical drawaing instructor telling us that way back when I was a sophomore in H.S in 1969.
 
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