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Hello everyone,
My neighbor gave me an old Toro 3521 tonight. Her husband passed away about 5 yrs. ago and it has not been used since then. I told her if I could get running I'd clear her driveway in the winter time. Anyhow since it has been sitting for at least 5 years and maybe even more. I need to clean\repair the carb from the pics you can see it is very gummed up. And the choke shaft is broken. I think this is a TECUMSEH MODEL H35-45598R with 632378 carb. My question is it appears at one time there was possibly an air filter or something attached to the carb, but I can't seem to find any info or pics of one. I do have the box that covers the carb assembly. Would anyone out there have a picture of the carb on their 3521 in working order you could post for me. Also any tips on things to check to get this thing running outside the obvious like oil, fuel filter, lube, check belts that sort of thing?
Thanks..









 

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welcome,

first most snowblowers, especially older ones do not use an air filter. just the sheetmetal box that you have. air filters generally would clog with snow and its not dusty out when snowing so there is no need for one.

second, that metal bracket screwed to the face of you carb is actually a clamp from the inside of an electrical box designed to hold metal "bx" type electrical wire in place in the box.

i dont know why it would be there. or what reason someone may have put it there. maybe the sheetmetal "bread box" as they were sometimes called got pushed in and was too close to the carb?. either way you dont need a filter and you can deep six the piece of metal.

that carb is a pretty basic and easy rebuild. a good kit will come with all gaskets, a low needle and the high needle on the bottom of the carb going through the float bowl. as well as the float needle.

or you can get a service carb for around 40 on the low end to 80 on the high end.
depending on shape of the inside of the carb and the 15 for the rebuild kit sometimes the whole replacement is easier. i had a rebuild go real easy just yesterday. but had another where the carb was so corroded inside i coughed up 80 for a replacement.
 

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ps ....if you get me the carb model number and brand or the engine number and spec number i can look up the carb. i know i have at least 4 or 5 old carbs kicking around and i could pull the choke shaft out and stick it in an envelope and send it out. just a stamp or two

send a pm if interested
 

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Great Info.. What did we ever do before the internet and all the forums. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.. I'll be teaching my 8 year old boy how to rebuild this carb.. Hopefully it will be a fun project for us. We'll see how bad it is on the inside :eek:
 

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there is a bracket that goes onto the carb and lines up with the small hole on the metal cover. sears parts direct has it for $4.47. sears has exact carb for $94 with the proper choke shaft to stick through the cover. the knob that goes on top to control is $3.14

a replacement (without choke shaft ) is around 80. go with 94 well worth the extra 14 for an exact replacement. but only if the rebuild does not work out.

i will send all the diagrams and part numbers as soon as i can.
 

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If you are spending $94, you might as well just make it $100 and get a new 6.5HP Honda Clone :)

 

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Hi ariff, welcome to the group. Sounds like it will be a good project for you and your son to do together.

Here are some videos that you might find helpful. If not these, this fellow has a series of videos that are useful for home mechanics.


There is some excellent tutorials on this site as well.

Small Engine Equipment Troubleshooting, Repairs and Safety

Good luck ,and have fun.
 

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Carb

Welcome to the forum

Good advice given, may be able to add a couple of things to make it alittle easier. The adapter that holds the cover over the carb should have a lever to work the choke (on most carbs I have, though some have a separate arm off the choke shaft itself). You'll want that. I don't see a fitting for a primer bulb on the carb, so you may or may not have that.

As grungy as that carb looks, you'll want to clean it all, most likely needing to clean out the area under the 2 welch plugs (small round discs, one above the float and one in the side of the carb). Be careful taking the one out of the side, there's not alot of clearance under it. You put a hole in them and stick a pick or something like that to leverage them out. There are some holes in the side one that go into the throttle bore, you need to insure they are open as they do plug up with gummy gas. A strand of phone wire is the perfect size to open them up. They best way to put new welch plugs in (included in full carb kits) is to support the carb with a block of wood on the opposite sides boss area (built up area, you'll see it), align them carefully then use a small hammer and a socket that just fits inside the edge of the plug and tap it in.

As far as the dirt and grime goes, best thing I've found is brake cleaner, works even better than carb cleaner for me. Might need to use an old toothbrush or q-tip to work off the grunge, just insure you don't leave any stray fibers in the carb when done. Then put in your new seals etc. Be sure when replacing the needlevalve seal, put it in the right direction and seat it fully (I use the chuck end of a small drill bit to push it in). Watch the direction of the opening on the little wire that attaches the needlevalve itself to the float (open end to the right, looking from the bottom with the hinge towards you). You may have to adjust the tang on the float for proper drop, most though I've done didn't need it but it could happen. Before doing that, insure you have the needlevalve seat in fully.

Open the main jet (unscrew it a couple of turns) before screwing that onto the carb through the bowl. Don't forget the seal on that, also insure the seal around the top of the bowl is seated as you push it on. Those 2 seals are where most leaks occur IMO.

Initial adjustments are 1 turn open on the main jet and 1 1/2 on the midrange jet. Fine tune them once you have it running.

Take pictures on the engine and as you disassemble it if you're new to rebuilding carbs. It's alot easier to refer to a picture to see how things like the shaft from the governor were attached rather than trying to remember and not being sure.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey there I had one other question. I am not really able to get the throttle control to work properly. I only see a spring connecting the lever and controller. Shouldn't there be a rod or something more here? It looks like a return spring only to me.
Thanks again!
 

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Carb

Looks like that might be the right one. Best way is either by engine or carb number. Engine number should be stamped into the top of the flywheel cover near where the headbolts go through it. Carb numbers are far harder to match out at least by the places I get parts from.

That one does have a primer nipple and I noticed your engine cover has a bulb. I assume that piece of cutoff hose is for the primer.

Get that carb then looks like all you need yet (if you don't already have them) is the carb to cover adapter, the cover and the choke knob (if you don't want to just turn the end of the choke shaft).

Still looks like a good looking machine.
 

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The rod is on top. It goes between the top of that long arm and the top of the carb butterfly. As the engine revs it pulls that long arm one way to slow the engine down and that spring pulls it back the other way to speed it up. That is how the governor works.
 

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dont touch any of that until the rebuild is done. the lever on the left is your governor lever. if the motor is not running under load it is not going to open full throttle. it will only give enough when it is at full throttle that it needs. if at full throttle sitting there, it will just open the throttle a bit, when you put a load on it the governor will pull the throttle open more as it needs it. if you work the throttle lever without the engine running you wont see much movement in the throttle shaft.

ps found 2 choke shafts. 2 sizes. let me know how the rebuild goes. i will have to keep that sight in mind, great price. the lever for the choke previously mentioned, is a straight shaft on yours. the knob i sent about earlier goes on that after your metal cover, obviously, and the metal bracket i mentioned connects carb face to the metal cove, no filter
 
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