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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,

I have a Toro 824 Snowblower circa late 80s. I obtained it from a nearby neighbor who’d upgraded to a new model.

Anyhow, upon receipt the engine wouldn’t start and a diagnosed it down to the point where I was checking the magneto. In the process of detaching the Interlock from the engine housing, there was a spark. Keeping the interlock detached allows for there to be a spark and the engine run fine.

The engine starts regardless of anything else (key position on or off) as long as the interlock is detached. To shut off the motor, I touch the interlock to the frame.


I don’t know much about electrical systems. But I’d love to get the machine to turnoff with out touching the interlock.

Any advice would be appreciated.

 

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I am not familiar with an 80's Toro, but typically the magneto has 2 wires, power and ground. The ground is connected to a switch, the ign key switch and/or the carb linkage. Perhaps what you are calling the interlock is the carb linkage, but that should be mounted to the engine and not be capable of being moved to a chassis part. The throttle control on older machines usually has a high speed setting and a low speed setting and then an engine off setting where the throttle lever with attached magneto grounding wire comes into contact with the grounded part of throttle base mechanism and grounds the magneto to the engine. There is usually a grounding wire from the magneto attached to the ign switch so that in ON position the magneto is not grounded and the ignition OFF position the magneto is grounded to the engine.

It appears the magneto grounding wire is not attached to the ignition switch but is attached to the "Interlock" that does not have a grounding feature built in. I would move the grounding wire from the interlock to the ignition switch.
 

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If you are talking about that handle interlock. RIP The BLOODY THING OFF of there. parts are now NLA 4 it.
 

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msptoro824,

When you said that it didn't matter whether the switch was on or off, I immediately thought the contacts for the switch are somehow shorted together, or the wiring to the switch is shorting somewhere to the frame and therefore it wouldn't matter what position the switch is in.

As such, you'd expect the machine not to start, because if the switch is shorted, it is like having it set to the "off" position all the time.

When the switch is not shorted, and working correctly, in the "off" position, it links that wire going to ignition module to ground. Therefore, no spark.

When you disconnected that wire you took the switch out of the circuit. Now the module isn't grounded out all the time, and you get spark.

If it's otherwise working ok, and you have to touch that wire to the frame or engine block to shut it down, you could either find a replacement for the switch, or if it's not available anymore, you could always just connect that wire to a toggle switch mounted somewhere convenient, then back from the other terminal on the switch to a good ground.



Just remember if you do that, if the toggle switch has in indicator plate to show on and off, your machine will regard the toggle position the opposite of what the indicator says.....lol. In other words, if the toggle switch indicates it is off, the engine will run. If the toggle switch indicates "on", that means the wire to the igniton module is grounded, and the engine won't run. :wink2:


I did something similar with an old mower for which I could no longer get parts. That old thing is still running, even though my add-on toggle switch looks a little goofy.....:grin:.
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