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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello again,

When I was blowing snow with my Toro 826 yesterday, I noticed that there seems to be a metal grinding noise and some vibration when the auger is engaged. According to some sources, this could very likely be the bearing gone bad. The machine is a late 1970's model, #38150 or #31763 based on what I was told last year on SBF (unfortunately, I was not able to locate a serial # anywhere on the machine - it's either painted over or removed).

Anyway, a quick parts lookup on Toro's website revealed that the main auger bearing (called "Ball bearing with collar") is part # 251-224. This part, however, gets very few hits in Google.... and a lot of the "bearings" under the same part # Google comes up with seem to be related to other stuff (like rollers, etc) and don't even look the same as an auger bearing in the pictures.

To add to the confusion, it appears that Toro changed the bearings to bushings sometime along the line, so the bearings are probably long discontinued by now. Unfortunately, they do not list what part # of "spherical auger bushing" is needed in lieu of the discontinued bearing.

:wacko:


In any case... if someone could point me in the right direction that would be awesome. I don't mind the bushing over the bearing (because I don't do a lot of blowing anyway - hehehe), but as it stands I can't find either one. The bearings are pretty much all gone/unavailable and the bushings have an unknown part # for my machine.

Are the "spherical bushings" all universal or are they machine-specific? I am wondering, because some eBay sellers don't even list part numbers for those... just the inner/outer diameter.


Thanks in advance for any help!


:(



P.S. Here is a nice "how to" from a guy who did it on a 521:


 

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You need to take it apart and pull the bearing. You might want to have a 251-224 on hand. Once it's apart you hopefully can read a number on it and confirm it's a 251-224 or get a number that you can cross to get something else.

They are plentiful on ebay: 251-224 bearing | eBay
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You need to take it apart and pull the bearing. You might want to have a 251-224 on hand. Once it's apart you hopefully can read a number on it and confirm it's a 251-224 or get a number that you can cross to get something else.

They are plentiful on ebay: 251-224 bearing | eBay

Thanks. I'm pretty confident it will be #251-224 that I need. The problem I have is that the bearings on eBay don't seem to look (in pictures, at least) as what I actually need. I agree that taking the machine apart would be the best way to assess the part, but like you say, if I do that I'd like to have the new part on hand.

To my understanding, the actual bearing is spherical (in the shape of a ball), whereas the eBay offerings appear to be standard flat bearings. I don't understand why the "same" part number yields so many different bearing options :



 

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The two lower photos appear to have a spherical shape to the exterior.

The Toro number is correct but when you try to cross it over to an SKF, CR, ... bearing manufacturer number it gets confusing. It might be a 123456 but there might be a prefix and or suffix that indicates the outer shell is straight, spherical, there is a metal gasket, rubber gasket, no gasket, machined for a retaining ring, ..... but the 123456 stays the same.

The missing parts of the 123456 is why you'll pull up different variants when searching.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the reply and pointers. :)

In regards to the same part numbers yielding different bearings, I understand that the search engine is not perfect. What I was referring to, as an example, is the second bearing in the list above (pic I posted from eBay).

It says "Toro 251-224" in the description/title, but it is clearly a flat bearing for a roller or something. I've experienced the same with websites that sell parts - they list the part number for Toro, but the picture is not actually what it's supposed to be. I figure maybe a lot of these places are using generic pics of bearings, but what would be the point of doing that?

Anyway... I'll keep looking, maybe I'll find something suitable or some third-party info on the proper bushing replacement/part # for my bearing. I'm not impressed with Toro's web support for their older products.

:(
 

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they list the part number for Toro, but the picture is not actually what it's supposed to be. I figure maybe a lot of these places are using generic pics of bearings, but what would be the point of doing that?
:(

It's cheaper and easier for them then trying to take or buy a photo of each bearing they sell. They have to worry about copyright so then can't just photo shop it.
They are also relaying on someone fully knowing what they want and who doesn't need to rely on a photo.
That's not always me. I feel way more secure "seeing" the actual part I'm ordering. I'll pay more buying from someone with the actual photo rather than a seller posting a representation if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)

Well, I'll be damned... your Google must work different from mine, lol! (perhaps it's the regional settings/IP address origin or something). How do you know it replaces the 251-224 bearing though? It doesn't list it in the description... :confused:

Replaces These Parts

TORO

12-8789
128789
26-6100
266100
63-3450
633450
Thanks!



It's cheaper and easier for them then trying to take or buy a photo of each bearing they sell. They have to worry about copyright so then can't just photo shop it.
They are also relaying on someone fully knowing what they want and who doesn't need to rely on a photo.
That's not always me. I feel way more secure "seeing" the actual part I'm ordering. I'll pay more buying from someone with the actual photo rather than a seller posting a representation if possible.
Exactly! I too like to see what I'm buying, especially online. Just because YOU know the part number you need for your application doesn't mean the retailer does also. Stock errors occur all the time, everywhere... like the time a local auto parts store sold me the wrong alternator for my truck. It was fun putting the old one back in after having taken it out, driving back to the store only to be told they need to "order" the right one and that it would get there in a week. :mad:

In any case, I just might pick up what Jackmels suggested, as soon as I verify that it is a direct replacement for Toro part# 251-224. Toro sure doesn't make it easy, do they?

:rolleyes:


EDIT: Found one even cheaper: $10.40 USD, free shipping:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/331742590072?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


Took a chance on it. I really hope I don't need any extra parts to make it fit in there... like a special brace, bracket or something.

.
 

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I have a couple pictures in my photo album showing a puller I made to push the shaft out of the bearing. I waited until summer to do mine, there was a lengthy bit of downtime involved.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have a couple pictures in my photo album showing a puller I made to push the shaft out of the bearing. I waited until summer to do mine, there was a lengthy bit of downtime involved.
Point well taken, thanks!

I already have a couple of pullers that should do the trick... but I have a vehicle in the garage for the winter that's taking quite a bit of room, so any repair involving tearing apart the Toro wouldn't be much fun to do right now.

:icon-thumbsdown:


I'm sure the bearing (or bushing - whichever Toro mystery part is in there right now) will probably hold for the winter. It seems to be noisy, but still does the job.

.
 
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