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Maybe I’m missing something, but why not just machine the whole pulley to 1” and have a Keyway cut into it? Then use an old fashioned keystock to secure?

I don’t think the bolt/thread is any big concern, you’d just need to have a spacer made to set the pulley depth correctly. This should be “elementary” stuff for a machine shop.

Edit: ahh I see why that wouldn’t work. I suppose what I would do is weld a collar onto the “skinny” part of the pulley so it could be machined and keyed to 1”.

Or, just have a new pulley machined from bar stock or match a proper size industrial pulley accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Maybe I’m missing something, but why not just machine the whole pulley to 1” and have a Keyway cut into it? Then use an old fashioned keystock to secure?

I don’t think the bolt/thread is any big concern, you’d just need to have a spacer made to set the pulley depth correctly. This should be “elementary” stuff for a machine shop.

Edit: ahh I see why that wouldn’t work. I suppose what I would do is weld a collar onto the “skinny” part of the pulley so it could be machined and keyed to 1”.

Or, just have a new pulley machined from bar stock or match a proper size industrial pulley accordingly.
Yes, that last one could be done, too.

I'm really clueless when it comes to what machine shops charge for anything. Is it all by the hour?

What do you think creating a whole new pulley would cost, versus welding a collar on, and expanding the hole in, the old one (which I think would be inexpensive)?
 

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If they can weld a spacer and bore out the hole, that would be cheapest I would think, but that’s just my guess. There would be less hours involved; typically they charge for time and material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 · (Edited)
Weld this set screw collar onto the 3/4" end of the pulley by welding and filling-in the evenly-distributed space between the set screw collar and the pulley.
After it's welded there has been created an end that is 2.25" OD, rather the 1.25" OD. The diameter will be slightly larger than the 2" OD of the pulley's belt guide. Then drill the 1" hole and machine a key-way. Sound reasonable?
 

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Weld this set screw collar onto the 3/4" end of the pulley by welding and filling-in the evenly-distributed space between the set screw collar and the pulley.
After it's welded there has been created an end that is 2.25" OD, rather the 1.25" OD. The diameter will be slightly larger than the 2" OD of the pulley's belt guide. Then drill the 1" hole and machine a key-way. Sound reasonable?
Yes; my only concern is you (they) would need to take extra caution on welding the collar to the pulley, as it would need to be welded right on the pulley’s belt guide edge. Certainly not impossible.

It would be better to machine that spacer down (or from appropriate round bar stock) so the OD is smaller than the pulley OD, say 1.75”, so the weld could be done away (under) from the belt guide edge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Yes; my only concern is you (they) would need to take extra caution on welding the collar to the pulley, as it would need to be welded right on the pulley’s belt guide edge. Certainly not impossible.

It would be better to machine that spacer down (or from appropriate round bar stock) so the OD is smaller than the pulley OD, say 1.75”, so the weld could be done away (under) from the belt guide edge.
The length of the 1.25" OD "nipple" over which the 1.5" ID collar will be welded is about 15/16". Let's call it 1". The collar is 3/4" wide. Here's how I'd do the welding.

-- Place the collar on the center a 6x6x1/8" steel plate and tack-weld it into position with one tiny tack.
-- Place the pulley, nipple down, into the center of the collar and clamp it into position so that a sandwich is created -- a sandwich which, as a whole, can be easily re-positioned according to need.
-- There will now be a 1/4" wide x 7/16" deep space, a valley, between the top edge of the collar and the wall that keeps the belt on the pulley. Fill that space with weld to the top of the wall. The collar will be 1/8" higher than the wall.
-- Grind off the tack weld that secures the nipple-end to the plate and move away the plate.
-- Now you will see the end-face of the collar and the end face of the nipple perfectly aligned. There will be a 1/4" wide x 3/4"" deep space (a valley) between the 1.25" OD of the nipple and the 1-1/2" ID of the collar right down to where the recently-applied weld is in front of the pulley's belt wall. Fill that entire space with weld slightly above the faces of the nipple and collar. Grind that excess off even/flat.
-- Expand hole from 3/4" to 1" and cut key-way.
-- Done.
Sound reasonable and easy to do? I think an experienced welder could do the welding in, what, 10 or 20 minutes? An expereinced millwright could drill the 1" hole and cut the key-way in maybe the same? You tell me. Maybe the welding/millright class at a high or trade school would be the best bet, as nitehawk55 has suggested.

(If I was still working at a power-generating station, I would hand the pulley, collar and above instructions to a friend of mine in the maintenance shop and ask him to see what he could do. I'd go home the same day with the modified pulley. Too bad that option is no longer available.)
 

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The length of the 1.25" OD "nipple" over which the 1.5" ID collar will be welded is about 15/16". Let's call it 1". The collar is 3/4" wide. Here's how I'd do the welding.

-- Place the collar on the center a 6x6x1/8" steel plate and tack-weld it into position with one tiny tack.
-- Place the pulley, nipple down, into the center of the collar and clamp it into position so that a sandwich is created -- a sandwich which, as a whole, can be easily re-positioned according to need.
-- There will now be a 1/4" wide x 7/16" deep space, a valley, between the top edge of the collar and the wall that keeps the belt on the pulley. Fill that space with weld to the top of the wall. The collar will be 1/8" higher than the wall.
-- Grind off the tack weld that secures the nipple-end to the plate and move away the plate.
-- Now you will see the end-face of the collar and the end face of the nipple perfectly aligned. There will be a 1/4" wide x 3/4"" deep space (a valley) between the 1.25" OD of the nipple and the 1-1/2" ID of the collar right down to where the recently-applied weld is in front of the pulley's belt wall. Fill that entire space with weld slightly above the faces of the nipple and collar. Grind that excess off even/flat.
-- Expand hole from 3/4" to 1" and cut key-way.
-- Done.
Sound reasonable and easy to do? I think an experienced welder could do the welding in, what, 10 or 20 minutes? An expereinced millwright could drill the 1" hole and cut the key-way in maybe the same? You tell me. Maybe the welding/millright class at a high or trade school would be the best bet, as nitehawk55 has suggested.

(If I was still working at a power-generating station, I would hand the pulley, collar and above instructions to a friend of mine in the maintenance shop and ask him to see what he could do. I'd go home the same day with the modified pulley. Too bad that option is no longer available.)
Yes that would work fine. I think the time estimates are pretty close. I do think you’d want to alternating “stitch” weld the collar, alternating sides to keep it from distorting. Maybe spread that few minutes of welding out over a half hour or so to keep it from getting too hot (and also distorting)

They probably won’t be able to fill the 3/4” deep gap, but they also really don’t need to. Just as long as the collar is securely attached to the pulley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
I should have mentioned that the pulley's two belt-guide walls are a hair shy of 1/8" thick each, which IMO is quite substantial. Once the equal space all around the collar and pulley are weld-filled, the end thus created is going to be very, very strong. The wall thickness around the present 3/4" hole is 0.25". The "combination" wall-thickness surrounding the new 1" hole will be 2.25" - 1" = 1.25" divided by 2 = 0.625" Now, that's beefy! If one wanted to spend some more money, one could have the collar OD turned down so that the final thickness of the wall surrounding the 1" hole would be, say, you-name-it, instead of 0.625". For one you-name-it example, turn it down to the same diameter as the belt-wall -- 2". Nice and neat and still plenty beefy at a wall thickness of 0.5".

Planning this out in detail makes me want to make one of these pulleys for an engine with a 1" output shaft. Maybe even buy a spare pulley and do it, "just in case". But I'm going to put new parts in my engine and continue to use it for, hopefully, more than another year(!) :), so I don't need a spare pulley.........yet. I pray that my engine does not turn out to be a lemon.

While doing a bit more study of the Predator 212cc engine (built by Loncin), I stumbled on the following video. It is very informative about the differences between the hemi (my engine's design) and non-hemi versions. What I found particulary interesting was the trouble the video's creator had with the hemi design, while never having any problem with the non-hemi design. He gets into this toward the end of the video. This has certainly been my experience with my Loncin/Toro hemi 252cc engine. If I were to buy a 212cc Loncin to replace my engine, it would have to be a non-hemi.

This 212cc engine is apparently extremely popular for vehicles of various kinds and, therefore, is very popular for modding. A minor modification can easily bring up its hp to that magic 8hp. There are tons of videos describing these mods in great detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
As I sit here typing, waiting for delivery of my engine parts, one question keeps dogging me. What will I do if my engine turns out to be an irreparable lemon?

No, I'm not going to get really upset and depressed and take my old 1-year-old non-functioning machine to the eco station. Instead, I'll buy a new, low cost engine and modify the shroud, not anything about the new engine (except maybe install a remote throttle control on the handle).

In fact, if I could turn the clock back only one week, rather than buy "genuine Toro" parts, I'd do some variation of one or more of the options below. It would be a very fun, very practical project, as long as our Overlords don't decide that this type of unsafe, dangerous behavior should be illegal and pass laws making it so.

If I could have found a suitable engine locally, there is a very good chance that my snow-blowing machine would be available for service today. (Of course doing this would have definitely voided the wonderful Toro 2-year warranty! :))
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And the likely result? Below is a Quick Chute model that has had a new engine installed. (I wonder how many hp the paddle system can actually handle, don't you?)
 
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