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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old Toro S-620 here in Minnesota. It's a one-stage that doesn't have a chute on top. I think I'm ready to get something that "works better". I have a typical suburban 3-car garage driveway, but this thing really can't throw snow very far, so I end up having to move a lot of the snow twice, and it takes a long time. My neighbor let me borrow his 22" 2-stage this week and I was amazed at how fast I was done.

Can anyone tell me how the S-620 would compare to a better one-stage? Do I need a 2-stage, or would a different one-stage with a chute be a lot better than my S-620 and sufficient enough for me? I'm trying to decide between a 2-stage or one-stage, new or used in either case.

I'm curious to hear some viewpoints. Thanks!
 

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That S-620 is a good machine when everything is adjusted properly.
Check the rubber blades, they should be 2.625" when new. This will have a big effect on a machine that otherwise runs good. Check the belt, it can be worn out or a little worn effecting how far it throws. The whole area where the paddles spin should be treated with some kind of lubricant or wax. I've used Pledge furniture polish in the past with great results, but WD40 works too. Just spray it liberally when it is dry and don't wipe it off.
As long as the engine is achieving the correct RPM, that machine should be just fine.
I have a little brother Toro S-140. It is only 14" wide and runs with the big dogs with no problem other than directing the snow. This little guy can throw about 25 feet with a full width path at over 6" deep. I even clear the plowed snow from the bottom of the drive with ease. I keep it in my Suburban so I can clear the plowed areas in my shop parking area. It handles it as good as the 2 stage (5/22 Craftsman) in the shop yet is so light I don't have to work as hard.
Yes, a machine with a more directional chute will make your snow removal a little bit less time consuming.
Bigger machines are great when you have lots of snow often, but I like the little guy for anything less than 6".

BTW- if you don't want it anymore, let me know...I love those old Toros.
 

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The Toro Power Clear 421 I purchased to supplement my 30 year old 8 hp 2-stage has done everything I asked of it so far. The 2-stage hasn't left the garage.
So far, the heaviest snowfall we have received is about 6" and that one had very little wind so I didn't have any real drifts to contend with.
An earlier 4" snow had a lot of wind I had 8 to 12 inch drifts that time.
The snowplow throws a lot of slushy snow back on to my sidewalk and that was about 6" to 10" in places.
The 421 single stage handled it all with no problem.
It throws light fluffy snow 30 to 40 feet and the slush about 6 to 12 feet.
It's light and it does the job very quickly.
My driveway is such that I have to do a lot of turning and changing the direction of the discharge. The QuickShoot makes that a very easy thing to do.

Find a neighbor that has a single stage with the chute and see how it works for him. Maybe he will let you clean some of his snow with it. :)
 

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Here is what I do (since I have 2 cars and not a 4X4) I use the big Bolens 2 stage and then I go back with my 2 cycle single stage because the big one clears the heavey stuff then the single stage cleans it down to the pavement and then I add the snowmelt and presto perfectly clean. Yes it is a bit of more work but then again my driveway is a hill and my neighbors always ask "How do you get your driveway so clean"
So there is my "MONK" method. (Yes its OCD and ADD)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
2.625" for the paddles? Are you serious? I just measured the rubber part, and I've only got 1.5" of black rubber. I'm still under 2" if I measure the metal part that grips the rubber. Can I expect it to throw snow a lot further if I change the rubber paddles? Someone recently told me that there should be no room between the paddles and the housing, and obviously there is lots of room on mine.

All in all, it sounds like my S-620 should be fine if I replace a few things. Fortunately, the engine runs very well and has no trouble starting. I'm diligent about keeping the gas new and running it dry before spring. I do know that the belt is slipping, so I was already planning on getting a new belt this week.

Thanks for all the info, this is why I asked!
 

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2.625" for the paddles? Are you serious? I just measured the rubber part, and I've only got 1.5" of black rubber. I'm still under 2" if I measure the metal part that grips the rubber. Can I expect it to throw snow a lot further if I change the rubber paddles? Someone recently told me that there should be no room between the paddles and the housing, and obviously there is lots of room on mine.

All in all, it sounds like my S-620 should be fine if I replace a few things. Fortunately, the engine runs very well and has no trouble starting. I'm diligent about keeping the gas new and running it dry before spring. I do know that the belt is slipping, so I was already planning on getting a new belt this week.

Thanks for all the info, this is why I asked!
The entire width of the rubber, including the portion mounted in the drum.
I just replaced them on a S-200 (same part #) and it went from not being able to move any snow, to WOW. The space between the rubber and housing should be minimal, just enough room for the rubber to pass through. The bigger the gap, the less snow can be pushed by the paddles as the snow will be missed by the rubber.
The theory behind that design is that the paddles rotate relatively fast taking very small bites at a time. If the gap is bigger than the "bites", then the snow will bypass the paddles. The result is very little snow will be blown.
The replacement paddles I found on-line were about $20 with shipping and only took about 10 minutes to install. You can Google search for snowblower parts and find several suppliers.
I've revived many machines that people were getting rid of because they didn't throw snow.
Good luck! Keep the old girl going.
 

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Can anyone tell me how the S-620 would compare to a better one-stage? Do I need a 2-stage, or would a different one-stage with a chute be a lot better than my S-620 and sufficient enough for me? I'm trying to decide between a 2-stage or one-stage, new or used in either case.
A year late but I thought I would throw in my 2¢ !

The last gen Toro 2 strokes (CCR24xx-CCR36xx) are pretty awesome machines. Lightweight (a bit more than your S-620) and powerful. IMHO, there is no reason to get a 2 stage unless you regularly get more than 6" of snow at a time.
 
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