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Hello all,
I have restored the wheels on a Toro 8/26 project, and it's time to pick out new tires. Does anyone have suggestions on what I should get? The machine is a Toro model 38150, and the size on the sidewall of the original Toro tire is 4.80/4.00-8. Would anyone suggest staying with the Toro tires, or another brand? Also, should I put any new tires on with tubes? Thanks for your time.:feedback:
 

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Whatever you decide be sure to mooch a little graphite tire lubricant from your local tire dealer or buy a small can of it as it is very handy for lubing wheel studs, lug nuts and bronze bearings on wheel shafts too.

When you get the new tires and tubes:

1. spread the graphite lubricant inside the tire with a kitchen towel covering the entire interior of the tire and on both tire bead edges.

2. spread the graphite lubricant on the clean tire rim and be sure to spread it on the inner and outer tire rim edges in a thicker band of lubricant. If you have some isopropyl alcohol to clean the rims with using a clean paper towel all the better-in that way you will be able to feel for any metal burrs and sand them off.

This part is when you are ready to install the tube:

1. insert the tube in the tire and inflate the tube to a low pressure and allow the tube to expand in the tire and leave it for a while to allow the rubber to expand within the tire and also allow the tube to become lubricated with the graphite lubricant.

2. spread the graphite lubricant on the exposed portion of the tire tube.

3. deflate the tube with a valve core tool and then reinsert the valve core and screw the valve cap back on the valve stem.

Now to the tire:

4. slide the assembled tube and tire on to the rim on one side only making sure the tube is closest to the valve core hole; the tubes have a a valve core that is closer to one side than the other.
Be sure to remove the valve cap and then push the stem through the valve stem hole and then take the valve core tool and tighten it on the valve stem to hold it in place.

5. the tire should have no problem sliding on the tire rim and then you can inflate it with the valve stem core removed to 12 pounds and and then allow the tire and tube to properly expand and stretch the tube to prevent the tube from becoming stuck in the tire. Be sure to leave the air hose connected and the air shut off when 12 PSI is reached. leave the tire and tube for an hour and then
allow the tube to deflate completely and then insert the valve stem core and reinflate the tire and tube to the correct pressure.

After this is done you can mount the tire on the axle shaft.


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Graphite lube for tire installs?

I am still learning something new everyday

.

I tell you, leonz is branching out. i don't think either of his last 2 recommendation included a product that begins with F and ends with M.






I also would never have thought of using Graphite on a tire/rim. I've only seen people use soapy water, and that apparently a no-no, probably from a rust standpoint, I assume.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the response guys! TDIPaul, did you put tubes in your tires?

Leonz: Thanks or the information. I would have never thought to use graphite lube like that.
 

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No tubes

I just wire wheeled the inside of the wheel to get it as smooth as possible, repainted the wheels and then installed new stems with grease on the trunks.

They have been airtight.

Installing tubes is the worst job
 
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