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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I’ve been fooling with a Troy bilt 2410 for the last couple days and I’ve been watching some videos on YouTube on the carb there’s a black plastic piece it’s in a v shape and has a couple springs running from it I’m pretty sure it’s for the butteryfly on the carb now my question is is that piece supposed to move side to side while the blower is running based on the amount of throttle or not? Because mine doesn’t move at all other then maybe an 1/8 inch play when I adjust the throttle it’s in one position and that’s where it stays but in some of these videos I see that piece moving freely
 

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Is that the throttle plate arm? Does it move the plate in the carburetor's throat, the round plate closest to the engine? That plate should definitely be able to move freely (if you move it directly, with the engine off), so that the governor can do its job.
 

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Yes it’s the one closest to the motor itself like I said the piece on top itself doesn’t move at all and if I cut the choke all the way out it runs very high rpms but if it’s stuck in the open position then it’s running WOT and that would explain the rpms correct?
 

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Yes. But don't keep running it like that! With the governor unable to function, nothing is limiting the engine's RPM. With no load, and the throttle wide open, the engine can over-speed, and tear apart its internals. Can you get the throttle plate to loosen up if you put some oil on it (where it goes through the carb), and work it back and forth by hand, with the engine off?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes I know I haven’t run it like that at any extended length because it doesn’t seem right to me at all I have been running it at 3/4 choke to keep everything slowed down and it does very good at that speed. I have tried working it with no luck I may try a little pb blaster on it to see if it gets it freeded up it was stored for a few years with gas in it so I’m guessing it’s a little gummed up in there
 

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Maybe some PB Blaster at the top, where the throttle shaft goes down into the carb, and also spray it on the inside of the carb's throat, where the throttle shaft meets the top and bottom of the throat? Just to apply it directly everywhere you can. If the shaft comes out the bottom of the carb as well, you could also spray it there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok it’s soaking as we speak. It runs well but it does seem to me it’s getting too much fuel but again I’m pretty sure it’s stuck at WOT I was worried it was a governor issue but I’m gonna guess this has something to do with it
 

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Update a little pb blaster and a screw driver and a little pressure and it’s running perfect the throttle was indeed stuck wide open and now the governor is doing what it’s supposed to and the motor is running very nice thank you for the help I appreciate it
 

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Jrdriver: I'm having the exact same problem today! I'm quite new at this stuff...can you please post a little more "detail" on what you had to do it fix this (where did you push the screw driver, where did you spray, etc.)? We're expecting 8" of snow tomorrow and I'd love to be able to use it. Thanks!
 

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Likely where the throttle plate shaft exits the carb, and gently using the screwdriver to get it to move. Carbs can have the throttle plate gum up and stick - it's not that uncommon - from sitting with old fuel too long or excessive dirt on the carb. Myself, I'd start with carb cleaner to get and crap off and go from there . . .
 

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econforti, on top of the carburetor, you'll likely see two items with linkages (or something else) connecting to them, to make them pivot.

The one closest to the opening of the carb, furthest from the engine, would be the choke. You'd have fairly-direct control over that one, you'd be able to set it open, or closed, or maybe somewhere in-between.

The second one, closest to the engine (further in from the opening of the carb) is the throttle plate. The governor mechanism would connect to this one. If the engine has a throttle lever, it would have some influence on this one, but you don't really control the throttle plate directly, the governor is also involved.

You want to make sure the second item, closest to the engine, is able to move freely and easily, from pretty much fully-open, to pretty much fully-closed. I'd start by just trying to move it with your fingers, and see what happens. You can definitely use carb cleaner spray as well, or penetrating oil (like Liquid Wrench, PB Blaster, etc) at least on the outside of the carburetor, where you can see the throttle shaft go into the carb. You can spray the oil into the carb as well, but I'd start with the outside, I guess. You don't really want to soak the inside of the carb with oil, or at a minimum, the engine will smoke for a while when it's running.

If the throttle is stuck open, you don't want to keep running it like that. With it spinning too fast, it can damage its internals, destroying the engine.
 

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And to follow up, unless the engine has a throttle and was shut down at idle, the gov typically holds the throttle wide open when not running, hence the reason they tend to get stuck there . . .
 

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I found the throttle plate, sprayed it down with some carb cleaner, wiggled it around for a minute and the machine is now running great! Thank you all for sharing your knowledge. I've literally never messed with an engine before and between you all and YouTube I probably saved myself $150+.
 
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