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2022 Great Lakes Edition
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I know I need a bridge rectifier and a in line fuse and maybe more. Just don't know the sizes I need to run. 🤷🏼‍♂️ TIA
Well, "maybe more".........

As Yanmar just mentioned, these designs now are becoming a bit more difficult these days to make generic/simple(one size fits all) with so many new products (blowers and LED's) now on the market. Agreed that our once simple need/want more light light additions have become much more LED and machine specific with only fewer flavors of commonalities, the electrical engineering design standpoints and such.

That said, I think my recent add-on's relate well here with probably only 11K ways to get there...LOL, but this is my take on your Pro EFI machine using a similar LED and the way I've designed and currently run several, including my new EFI.

So, your Pro's EFI and it's stator config and trying not bring down the server with TMI..............

As mentioned, I've just completed a similar EFI setup (I run two additional LED, 55W and 20W) with a 60W alt and my take for you after looking at the Arien's doc's on your machine, yours appears to also have a 60W alt output, BUT yours has a shared AC feed to your........

1) ECU/"ECM"(not switched)

2) Headlight(not switched)

3) Heated grips(switched)

Mine uses AC like yours does for the headlights and ECU, HOWEVER mine additionally rectifies the AC to DC(unfiltered) with a external bridge for the heated grips and the chute/deflector motors.

At any rate...........

You'd like to add/run a 48W LED spot light (spec'd @ 10-30V), but also I assume(like mine), you still want heated grips, motors(mine), original lighting to all function properly..........

Your(our) biggest challenge adding ANY additional loads and keeping our above listed stuff running, esp our EFI machines is that we DO NOT want to take the stator's required AC voltage magnitude down with loads so much that the ECU's AC voltage level drops out and......

a) The ECU doesn't function/can't run the blower's pump, injector, sensors, etc, etc properly.

*b) It can't charge the NiMh battery at a reasonable RPM.

We can assume based on Ariens design/battery and voltage used, it's probably and safely said that the stator AC's voltage should not dip below the battery's voltage(1.2V*6 series NiMh cells), so no less then 5.1VAC(7.2VDC) AND add at least 0.35VAC(0.5VDC) for the ECU's charge regulator circuitry's overhead for battery charging. (5.1VAC + 0.35VAC) * 1.414 ~= 7.7VDC.

[VAC{rms} * 1.414 = VAC{peak} = Vp, Vp ~ = VDC using full wave rectifier and adequate filtering]

So, rule of thumb, no less then 5.1VAC to keep the ECU alive and not risk running down/off the battery alone, BUT safest yet no less then approx. 5.5VAC for charging the battery too!!(this includes the overhead of the circuit internal to the ECU).

First order of business, get rid of that Halogen if you haven't already, go to an LED, this will help save some of that power that you can use setting up your LED spot light.

Your LED (48W) beings that it's rated to run "10-30 volts" implies (to me) it contains a " LED Driver IC/Chipset" internal to the unit........This is a good thing, they're easier to design with and is like both my LED's on my EFI . This type is probably more reflective of most nowadays LED's out there with internal drivers/chipsets that can work ALSO directly powered with AC. See my chute light, it is hooked directly to the AC output of my stator, no rectifier or cap needed, BUT my chute LED is only 1.5A or 20W @ 12V.

Moving on.....

I THINK if you hook your LED (48W) up directly to your AC, it should function like my chute LED, BUT it probably will take your stator's voltage too low (esp if with heated grips turned on AND running ECU/engine stuff). Recall our limit is 60W at more or less full RPM/speed and your LED as it is, will w/o a limit in place, use/suck 48W given 12V (when and if it sees 12V at high'ish RPM's). See above rules of thumb.

If this is the case, as is my light bar (55W) on front of my EFI, you have to "limit the current" to the LED as a "work around" and force it to always run no higher than at or near it's lower voltage/power limit spec.

To do this, I use a rectifier diode (bridge type, at the least a min of 10A forward current, 100V reverse will do) tapped directally off the stator's AC output, then a filter cap(22,000uf 25VDC) on the DC side of that rectifier and then a "buck converter", then the LED spot light............ Adjust the buck converter such that you only ALLOW it so much current (2, 3A for example) at a decent idle in so much as to not take away/reduce too much from your overall needed voltage. See above rules of thumb.

When you limit current and the LED is still lit up nicely(guessing some 70/80%), it turns out the LED will be running at or near their lower spec's voltage limit (10-30V) of 10V, this is where they can run at this lower current (2, 3A for example) and still produce decent light.

When setting up the buck converter, you'll use it in "constant current mode". To do this, temporally hook its input up to a 12V battery, turn both the current and voltage pots down all the way, then turn the current pot back up a turn or two, now with NO LOAD, adjust the voltage pot up until you see the output voltage turn on to about 11'ish volts, now turn the current pot back down maybe one turn.

Next, remove test battery setup and insert/mount the buck converter into the blower's setup you have now (output of the cap), hook up the LED to the converters output and fire up the blower. With it idling a good idle (say 1500 RPM's) and the LED, heated grips and the original light(replacement LED) ALL switched to on, turn up the current pot while measuring/watching the blowers AC voltage.

Without the LED quite on yet, you will be measuring the AC voltage (somewhere around 15V for example guessing) and as you turn up the current on the buck convertor, the LED will come/pop on and the AC voltage will begin to drop. Now you "chase the dragon", up the current enough to run the LED well, BUT not so much you take the AC at the given RPM too far down. See above rules of thumb.

This will be your/the worst case lower limit set point where everything will juuuuust work ducky, i.e., giving all items the required power they needed to work at this low of RPM AND not letting the light bar take too much and still give off light. At any high RPM or grips off, etc, it is all free lunch...........;)

My hopes are this all makes sense, it's really not the complicated, just some dirty details to pay attension to that can't be overlooked if you want the design to be robust and work properly without falling in the pool doing it.


*The ECU's PCB contains onboard components that convert(rectify) then condition(filter and regulate) the AC to DC then it's fed back out to charge the NiMh, if the AC supply gets too low, the charging circuit quits due to lack necessary power (I*V) to charge with.
 

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Might work with both and not even need a rectifier/regulator, need spec's to know with more certainty, also sounds like you got enough power w 60W and no EFI makes thing even simplier, good start........... Got a part number? and/or a link to the LED's specs?
 

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Would you happen to know the wattage of your stator?

I think(perhaps someone else here has the spec) those engines only had like 2 or 3 amps and that's like 20/30'ish watts....Each of those flood LED's are 30 watts for 60'ish watts total. Try it see what it does, worse case they're dim or just won't come on all all. No worries either way, your blower will be fine either way.

That incandescent bulb(21 watts typical) can be replaced typically by something like THIS(11 watts) or THIS(2.8 watts), so switching to either will buy you some wattage that can help add to the possible under'age you might have with the two flood LED's.
 

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Regarding the light you and Onacer posted, would I need to hook up a recifier and capicitors if I was just changing the bulb??
Good catch...

✔【Attention】This bulb support used range is DC9-30v, in some special models can not be used:used in some alternating current motorcycle,connect car electric machinery or some truck(High starting voltage height DC38V).

They do claim "chip set", but mixed with "DC9-30V range" which, to me say's it'll also work on AC, but I'm not so good at Chinese re-interpreted to English re: the motorcycle app in the above statement, so I just put my spare 2.8 Watt model on a AC 60Hz power supply @ around 15VAC.......

Light Gas Wood Circuit component Electric blue


You should be good with pure AC, yes. That stator may already have a rectifier built in, some do, some don't, won't matter looks like. I run this same bulb on my TB and I believe(not firm on documentation source) that headlight circuit is also pure AC.
Water Automotive lighting Light Vehicle Automotive tire


Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Slope


If you need the 11 Watt model tested, let me know, I have those in my Honda for back ups, BUT easily tested as well.
 

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I have pulsing/flickering at anything other than wide open throttle. I checked voltages and I only have 10.6vac coming off the stator at wot and as soon as I turn down throttle at all the flickering increases.
As always, check that connections are all in good shape, BUT just sounds like your lights are overloading your stator.......Think your stator is a 60W, what type light you running?
 

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So the 10.6VAC sounds about right @ stator's output, might be a touch low esp if you unplugged it as Ariens says my 60W EFI's stator shuold be 11.5VAC - 14VAC @ WOT.........You MIGHT have a stator winding loop or two shorted, not sure......What type meter are you using? A lower end meter might give an error of 1V or 2V, depends esp on a raw noisy ole stator measurement.

HOWEVER, after the rectifier and caps(it cleaner for measuring) it becomes around *(10.6VAC*1.414 = 15VDC) unloaded, including diode drops(15V -0.6*2 = 13.8VDC).........Loaded(lights on) measuring 10VDC sounds about right, the lights are probably 40W, 50W, 60W?


*10.6VAC is a "RMS" voltage reading we get from our meters on the standard AC setting, which when rectified and filter it becomes mostly a "peak" value and then more or less stays(when unloaded and filtered) around this peak level for the DC value........ To convert from RMS to peak, the RMS value is multiplied by 1.414.

**Our house AC voltage of 120VAC is also in RMS, but it's peak reading is 120*1.414 = 170Vp
 

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A 36W along with your 8.5W, those should both run nicely at WOT, esp if the grips were off off.

You mentioned 10.3VDC up in #1545, with just the 36W and the 8.5W on, that sounds too low @ WOT, thinking your stator has some shorted windings if it in fact it is a 60W type, which I think it is suppose to be.

At idle, with both on could be pushing it though, I'd guess the stator will put out around half or 30W at idle and that 60W rating is probably somewhere near WOT
 
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