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Nice light

You have 3 watts left to use

How bout a cell phone mount with charger?

I don’t think anyone has done that yey


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But my cell phone warp charger requires 6A @ 5V = 30W...
...add a solar panel...? 😁

Andymann... yes we're giving you just a bit of a good-natured hard time... 'tis the Season to be jolly. 😎

I suggest doing some testing... haul the lights and a battery out in the dark and see if you really need both lights.
 

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I know I need a bridge rectifier and a in line fuse and maybe more. Just don't know the sizes I need to run. 🤷🏼‍♂️ TIA
 

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Have a read through this thread... most eventualities are pretty well covered. (y)
1 of these days someone almost needs to just make 1 really good post that cover most if not all the important info and then sticky it. i know i really wouldn't be reading through nearly 1500 post to possibly find a answer. feels like it would be easier to create new post than do that.
 

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1 of these days someone almost needs to just make 1 really good post that cover most if not all the important info and then sticky it...
The problem with that is that LED tech has been rapidly evolving, and so has lots of the associated peripherals and available accessories.

You're welcome to try, but it's still shooting at a moving target... imo. I think we'd end up with another thread very similar to this one.

I dunno... ?

[Edit: You did give me an idea, which was to add a note to the first post in this thread reflecting the above. Thanks. Y.R.]
 

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I know I need a bridge rectifier and a in line fuse and maybe more. Just don't know the sizes I need to run. 🤷🏼‍♂️ TIA
Well, "maybe more".........

As Yanmar just mentioned, these designs now are becoming a bit more difficult these days to make generic/simple(one size fits all) with so many new products (blowers and LED's) now on the market. Agreed that our once simple need/want more light light additions have become much more LED and machine specific with only fewer flavors of commonalities, the electrical engineering design standpoints and such.

That said, I think my recent add-on's relate well here with probably only 11K ways to get there...LOL, but this is my take on your Pro EFI machine using a similar LED and the way I've designed and currently run several, including my new EFI.

So, your Pro's EFI and it's stator config and trying not bring down the server with TMI..............

As mentioned, I've just completed a similar EFI setup (I run two additional LED, 55W and 20W) with a 60W alt and my take for you after looking at the Arien's doc's on your machine, yours appears to also have a 60W alt output, BUT yours has a shared AC feed to your........

1) ECU/"ECM"(not switched)

2) Headlight(not switched)

3) Heated grips(switched)

Mine uses AC like yours does for the headlights and ECU, HOWEVER mine additionally rectifies the AC to DC(unfiltered) with a external bridge for the heated grips and the chute/deflector motors.

At any rate...........

You'd like to add/run a 48W LED spot light (spec'd @ 10-30V), but also I assume(like mine), you still want heated grips, motors(mine), original lighting to all function properly..........

Your(our) biggest challenge adding ANY additional loads and keeping our above listed stuff running, esp our EFI machines is that we DO NOT want to take the stator's required AC voltage magnitude down with loads so much that the ECU's AC voltage level drops out and......

a) The ECU doesn't function/can't run the blower's pump, injector, sensors, etc, etc properly.

*b) It can't charge the NiMh battery at a reasonable RPM.

We can assume based on Ariens design/battery and voltage used, it's probably and safely said that the stator AC's voltage should not dip below the battery's voltage(1.2V*6 series NiMh cells), so no less then 5.1VAC(7.2VDC) AND add at least 0.35VAC(0.5VDC) for the ECU's charge regulator circuitry's overhead for battery charging. (5.1VAC + 0.35VAC) * 1.414 ~= 7.7VDC.

[VAC{rms} * 1.414 = VAC{peak} = Vp, Vp ~ = VDC using full wave rectifier and adequate filtering]

So, rule of thumb, no less then 5.1VAC to keep the ECU alive and not risk running down/off the battery alone, BUT safest yet no less then approx. 5.5VAC for charging the battery too!!(this includes the overhead of the circuit internal to the ECU).

First order of business, get rid of that Halogen if you haven't already, go to an LED, this will help save some of that power that you can use setting up your LED spot light.

Your LED (48W) beings that it's rated to run "10-30 volts" implies (to me) it contains a " LED Driver IC/Chipset" internal to the unit........This is a good thing, they're easier to design with and is like both my LED's on my EFI . This type is probably more reflective of most nowadays LED's out there with internal drivers/chipsets that can work ALSO directly powered with AC. See my chute light, it is hooked directly to the AC output of my stator, no rectifier or cap needed, BUT my chute LED is only 1.5A or 20W @ 12V.

Moving on.....

I THINK if you hook your LED (48W) up directly to your AC, it should function like my chute LED, BUT it probably will take your stator's voltage too low (esp if with heated grips turned on AND running ECU/engine stuff). Recall our limit is 60W at more or less full RPM/speed and your LED as it is, will w/o a limit in place, use/suck 48W given 12V (when and if it sees 12V at high'ish RPM's). See above rules of thumb.

If this is the case, as is my light bar (55W) on front of my EFI, you have to "limit the current" to the LED as a "work around" and force it to always run no higher than at or near it's lower voltage/power limit spec.

To do this, I use a rectifier diode (bridge type, at the least a min of 10A forward current, 100V reverse will do) tapped directally off the stator's AC output, then a filter cap(22,000uf 25VDC) on the DC side of that rectifier and then a "buck converter", then the LED spot light............ Adjust the buck converter such that you only ALLOW it so much current (2, 3A for example) at a decent idle in so much as to not take away/reduce too much from your overall needed voltage. See above rules of thumb.

When you limit current and the LED is still lit up nicely(guessing some 70/80%), it turns out the LED will be running at or near their lower spec's voltage limit (10-30V) of 10V, this is where they can run at this lower current (2, 3A for example) and still produce decent light.

When setting up the buck converter, you'll use it in "constant current mode". To do this, temporally hook its input up to a 12V battery, turn both the current and voltage pots down all the way, then turn the current pot back up a turn or two, now with NO LOAD, adjust the voltage pot up until you see the output voltage turn on to about 11'ish volts, now turn the current pot back down maybe one turn.

Next, remove test battery setup and insert/mount the buck converter into the blower's setup you have now (output of the cap), hook up the LED to the converters output and fire up the blower. With it idling a good idle (say 1500 RPM's) and the LED, heated grips and the original light(replacement LED) ALL switched to on, turn up the current pot while measuring/watching the blowers AC voltage.

Without the LED quite on yet, you will be measuring the AC voltage (somewhere around 15V for example guessing) and as you turn up the current on the buck convertor, the LED will come/pop on and the AC voltage will begin to drop. Now you "chase the dragon", up the current enough to run the LED well, BUT not so much you take the AC at the given RPM too far down. See above rules of thumb.

This will be your/the worst case lower limit set point where everything will juuuuust work ducky, i.e., giving all items the required power they needed to work at this low of RPM AND not letting the light bar take too much and still give off light. At any high RPM or grips off, etc, it is all free lunch...........;)

My hopes are this all makes sense, it's really not the complicated, just some dirty details to pay attension to that can't be overlooked if you want the design to be robust and work properly without falling in the pool doing it.


*The ECU's PCB contains onboard components that convert(rectify) then condition(filter and regulate) the AC to DC then it's fed back out to charge the NiMh, if the AC supply gets too low, the charging circuit quits due to lack necessary power (I*V) to charge with.
 

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I've got a stator putting out 60W AC on an Ariens Deluxe 28, I'm looking to add two 18w LED pods (36w total). Should I use a bridge rectifier or an AC/DC converter to do the job? I've seen both endorsed here.
 

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Might work with both and not even need a rectifier/regulator, need spec's to know with more certainty, also sounds like you got enough power w 60W and no EFI makes thing even simplier, good start........... Got a part number? and/or a link to the LED's specs?
 

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Might work with both and not even need a regulator, need spec's to know with more certainty, also sounds like you got enough power w 60W and no EFI makes thing even simplier, good start........... Got a part number? and/or a link to the LED's specs?
Here’s a link to the lights from Amazon:

Auxbeam 4" LED Pods 18W Flood LED Light Bar 1800lm Driving Light Off Road Lights for SUV ATV UTV Trucks Pickup Boat (Pack of 2) Amazon.com


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Operating Voltage: 9-32V

It appears to have a "LED driver IC" with that wide range of operating voltage and they don't state "DC", just "9-32V"........Hook'um both up in parallel with each other then directly to the AC output of your stator and fire it up, bet they work just dandy by themselves....Add a switch if need be of course.
 
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