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after doing a bunch of homework I want to finally buy an ultrasonic cleaner to clean Honda carburetors.

the selections are overwhelming.

my main question is what SIZE should i get? 3-6-9 Litre or other size ?i will only need one big enough to do one carb at a time.

and what brand do you all recommend? I don't want cheap but don't need an industrial/professional grade either as i will probably only do about 12-20 in a year.

I have seen them from $69 to $699 and just don't know what would work for my hobby shop. what works for you?

thanks.
 

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The HF one is cheap, I know I have one. What I learned is never leave solution in the tank overnight with the cover on. The plastic can and will turn opaque even with a non solvent solution for cleaning. Don't walk away from it as the heater doesn't always turn off when the timer for the cleaning cycle ends. Boiled off a tank of cleaning solution and ruined a carb that way.
One trick I thought was excellent was to put the carb/parts into a glass container or even a plastic bag with solution into the cleaner filled with water. The ultrasonic will still penetrate the glass but it's so much easier to clean up the bottom of the glass jar or just toss the bag than the plastic tray and cleaners tank. Just want to make sure the glass or bag is on the plastic tray and not on the tank itself. You don't want to have metal against the tank as it will wear a hole in your tank. I'm not sure about glass but I wouldn't take the chance.

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+1 on the HF unit. Mine is around 5 years old, has cleaned a few dozen carbs, and lots of other little parts and tools. I too put the cleaning solution in another container, and then that put that container on the plastic tray, with around 1/2 full water. Seems to work just as well, and no worries about corroding the tank.

I will probably upgrade at some point, always looking for a good used unit.
 

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I started with the smaller HF unit...and used it for three years, but it is too small for most carbs, I now use the lager one...about $89 if I remember, then the 20% coupon......
 

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Dumb question....do you first go though the normal cleaning process with carb spray and wire in holes before the ultasonic cleaner --- or do you just disassemble the carb and run it through the ultrasonic cleaner?
 

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Dumb question....do you first go though the normal cleaning process with carb spray and wire in holes before the ultasonic cleaner --- or do you just disassemble the carb and run it through the ultrasonic cleaner?
I'll spray them down with some brake cleaner first, to get the heavy grime off. The dis-assemble and run it in the Ultrasonic. And then run welding tip cleaners thru the holes. Pre-clean saves on having to change the cleaner in the ultrasonic to much. I use Simple Green.
 

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I soak in Simple Green straight in the sonic cleaner.....I dismantle the carb first......then blow out the passages with air, make sure the orifices are open with torch tip cleaners, put in a new welch plug and try her out.
 

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I try to clean heavy junk off the outside first, if possible. Then I disassemble it as much as I can easily.

For a float carb, the bowl comes out, jet & emulsion tube comes out, etc. For something like a diaphragm carb (chainsaw), I take off the plates at both ends, remove the diaphragms and things that will come out easily.

I have not removed Welch plugs, nor have I done mechanical cleaning, like running a wire through the jet. Admittedly, that would be important if there was a piece of grit/rubber stuck in it.

Then I heat & degas the solution, and clean them using Simple Green HD. I usually give them an hour, since I'm rarely in a rush. If I'm concerned, I may flip the carb over halfway though, or give it another whole cycle that way. I figure too much beats too little, at least within reason.
 

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I take out welch plugs and the needle seat and run all the orfices and jets with some sort of soft wire (to not damage them) and spray out completely. I'm sure it would help somewhat (and I have an ultrasonic) but I have never had a cleaning fail without using one either. I think the key is knowing where all the passages are . . .
 

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I would never use welding tip cleaners, the serrations in the wires on tip cleaners will damage jets and passageways by reaming them out. Honda makes a jet cleaning tool that looks and works like a tip cleaning tool without the serrations on the wires. The Honda tool has 10 different wire sizes on it. Small enough for the very tiny slow jets, up to the bigger ones for the main jets. Those jet cleaning tools are available at Honda Power Equipment dealers. You can also find them on EBay, look for the Honda jet cleaning tool, make sure it is the "Honda" tool before buying it. It has a blue case cover.
Another great solvent is made by "S100", the motorcycle cleaning solution that you just spray on and hose off for cleaning a motorcycle. That stuff works wonders on carbs. It is a waterbased solution that will unclog jets and other tiny passageways,even without running the jet cleaning wire through the jets. It will dissolve the varnish buildup, gum and sulfation in the carbs that no other carb cleaners will remove, especially the sulfation that coats the fuel bowls. It wont damage any surfaces, rubber, Viton float tips, paper gaskets or any metals. Just put it in a plastic or glass cup or jar and place your parts in it and let it soak for a while, you would be surprised how well it cleans and makes metal parts look like new again. It can be rinsed off with water or carb cleaner. It is much less expensive than an ultrasound cleaner, and if done right, it cleans as well or better than an ultrasound machine. The "S100" solution is available at most motorcycle shops that carry cleaning accessories for bikes. Honda dealerships have it marked as "Hondabrite total cycle cleaner", You can even spray it on your car and clean your nice car with it. It comes in spray bottles and various size refill jugs. I usually buy it in the 5 litre jug, but it even comes in 1 quart bottles also.
 

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I almost forgot to mention, if you ream out or drill out a carb jet, you will ruin it. Carb jets are made with a "Venturi" in them. When you ream or drill them out, you take out the "Venturi" part of the jet.
The "Venturi" causes the fuel flow to speed up moving through the jet, where it will mix with air in the emulsion tube before it enters the main venturi of the carb. That helps to vaporize the fuel better, for better and cleaner burning in the cylinder to produce better power and fuel economy.
A lot of posts talk about people replacing the main jet in Honda carbs with bigger jets. If you need more fuel to make it run richer, put the bigger jet in it, don't drill or ream out the jet. If you ream out the jet it will just piss out big droplets of fuel into the main venturi of the carb and it wont atomize or vaporize properly, and wont burn properly in the combustion chamber. It can cause fouled plugs, black smoke, fouled engine oil from the raw gas wetting the cylinder wall and getting down into the engine oil, rich running conditions, power loss and poor fuel economy.
 

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I almost forgot to mention, if you ream out or drill out a carb jet, you will ruin it. Carb jets are made with a "Venturi" in them. When you ream or drill them out, you take out the "Venturi" part of the jet.
Do you have a reference for this? I hadn't heard this before. But I've heard many times that is *is* OK to drill out a jet. As well as people here seeming to report success with drilling them out.

Is the idea that the original hole itself is not simply drilled straight through?

Or that every size of jet starts as a different-shaped piece of brass, for that specific hole size?

To be honest, neither would have been my guess. It would seem surprising to me if every jet started with unique dimensions, based on what size hole was going to be drilled in it.

I got a parts list recently for a Walbro carb of mine. It shows the jet that's used, with the orifice size. It also lists a part number for a Blank jet, with no size specified. I'm going on the assumption that this is the base brass jet, with no drilled hole at all. And that they then drill the size needed for that carb.

I don't have proof of this, but it seems pretty reasonable to me. That would allow machining one base jet, and then drilling that single part to whatever size is needed.

I drilled out a jet recently and it appeared to run well, though I didn't check for a fouled plug. If it really is unacceptable to drill one out, I'd like to learn.
 

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A also would like to see some reference for this. Is a venturi with no tap (passageway) at the throat still a venturi or just a restrictor?
I'd believe that some may have tapered entry and exits but I'm not convinced simply enlarging the calibrated orifice will cause damage simply because of the overall shape change.
 

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From an aviation site: "If you want to believe the original manufacturer Marvel Schebler, you shouldn't drill any jet. Get the proper one for your engine. The reason is a jet is usually not a straight constant diameter hole and may be tapered or stepped. A jet is designed to give the proper mixture throughout the full throttle range for a particular engine. Don't screw with the only thing keeping you in the air." This may be overkill for a snowblower, but reasonable advice anyway. I was always told the same thing when I was rebuilding OPE and outboards in the 1960s.
 

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Do you have a reference for this? I hadn't heard this before. But I've heard many times that is *is* OK to drill out a jet. As well as people here seeming to report success with drilling them out.

Is the idea that the original hole itself is not simply drilled straight through?

Or that every size of jet starts as a different-shaped piece of brass, for that specific hole size?

To be honest, neither would have been my guess. It would seem surprising to me if every jet started with unique dimensions, based on what size hole was going to be drilled in it.

I got a parts list recently for a Walbro carb of mine. It shows the jet that's used, with the orifice size. It also lists a part number for a Blank jet, with no size specified. I'm going on the assumption that this is the base brass jet, with no drilled hole at all. And that they then drill the size needed for that carb.

I don't have proof of this, but it seems pretty reasonable to me. That would allow machining one base jet, and then drilling that single part to whatever size is needed.

I drilled out a jet recently and it appeared to run well, though I didn't check for a fouled plug. If it really is unacceptable to drill one out, I'd like to learn.
With 4 decades of experience with small engines and motorcycles, plus working with Honda engineers and their extensive training and building race or performance engines.
A lot of race engine technicians know about what I mentioned. A jet on a good high quality, performance carb has very precision machined jets. Most of it is done with a laser when they manufacture the jet.
Some cheaper carbs jets are nothing more than a hole drilled in them, but most carbs, especially ones that have to meet EPA requirements are machined with a "Taper", or as I called it, a "Venturi".
Most of your "Old Timer" techs know about how a jet is made. I do have some of the official Kehin and Mikuni carb technical drawings and blueprint info of how the carb jets are made. That info was made available at the Factory training schools when they were teaching fuel systems, it was very interesting.
I'm sure you could probably find some of that info online somewhere. Most all the stuff I had was from the Factories, so that is probably their "Trade Secret" info that was only given out to "Authorized Techs" at the time.
You might be able to find someone, an "Old Timer" that works at a Auto or Speed Shop, performance shop that is very familiar with carbs that could give or show you a cross section drawing of a jet.
Jets are numbered according to the size, some are a metric diameter of the hole or bore at its narrowist point, and some numbers refer to the amount of fuel that can pass through it.
I hope some of the info I gave you will help you to understand about carb jets, as they are starting to be a "Thing of The Past" now with everything being switched over to fuel injection now days.
 

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From an aviation site: "If you want to believe the original manufacturer Marvel Schebler, you shouldn't drill any jet. Get the proper one for your engine. The reason is a jet is usually not a straight constant diameter hole and may be tapered or stepped. A jet is designed to give the proper mixture throughout the full throttle range for a particular engine. Don't screw with the only thing keeping you in the air." This may be overkill for a snowblower, but reasonable advice anyway. I was always told the same thing when I was rebuilding OPE and outboards in the 1960s.
Hi Tabora, I just rebuilt a Marvel Schebler Carb for a 1960's Minneapolis Moline tractor. A lot of older farmers were very familiar with them, as they were a common carb back in the day.
Thanks for the input and lets hope we can put our snow equipment away for the season soon, I;m ready for warn weather again soon.
 

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To all you guys out there who like to clean carbs and the jets, the Honda Jet Cleaner Set tool part# 07JPZ-001010B was available at a Authorized Honda Power Equipment Dealer as a Honda Special Tool.
Motorcycle dealers could not get the tool because it was considered "Tampering with Emission Control Systems". But Power equipment dealers can get the tool.
Some dealers will sell you the tool, other dealers wont sell it to the public because it is considered a "Special Factory Tool" that can be used to take work away from the servicing dealer and also to "tamper with emissions".
You figure, most service work done at Power Equipment dealerships has to do with clogged carbs, so if they sell you that tool they will loose money and business/work from you because you will be able to fix your own carb instead of taking it back to them so they can "empty your pocket" with the labor charges to clean your carb.
 
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