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Discussion Starter #1
I suspect this is general question, but just in case it is specific to a brand or model I have a Toro CCR 3650. It is single stage machine with a two cycle
engine. Two weeks ago I cleaned up a 7" snow with no problems. Today I tried a 10" snow. Both were light and fluffy. Two round trips on the 130' driveway went fine. Then it started to push the snow forward as though the
chute was clogged. But the chute was clear. I found it would throw, but only a few feet, if I went very slow and took only a few inches of snow. Speed up or take a wider chunk of snow and the machine acted like the chute was clogged. I noticed a change in the sound of the engine when that happened, but I don't know how to describe it. The rubber on the auger is smooth and is close to the body (or whatever the cylinder it turns in is called). The fuel mixture is well shaken and from the same batch and can I used two weeks ago and in a chainsaw I used last week. Suggestions about possible cause and cure are welcome. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Fixed, thanks, getting Toro parts

You are both correct. It was the drive belt. Thank you.

I did not even know it was a belt drive. Based on your diagnosis, I took off a side panel, the one that was away from the wall and thus easiest to
get at. By luck, it was the correct side, the left side in case I'm not the only one that did not know. The belt looked fine with no frayed edges or
glazed surfaces. But there was a lot of black powder around, so I knew you were right. After a new belt, all is well. Thanks again.

I think Toro wants us to deliver the machine to a service center rather than allow DIY repairs. Two dealers told me they could not identify the
correct replacement belt from the name Toro CCR 3650, but I needed a model number. The second dealer found the model number because he had a CCR 3650 in the shop. After I got the driveway cleared, I went to look for the model number. I still had all the paperwork from the original purchase, including the bill of sale, the owner's manual, Toro brochures, and the store's sale flyer. I found the model number once identified as a model number, once called a part number, and two more times where it looked like it could have been an identifying number of the paper it was printed on. The dealer that provided the belt told me he would need the serial number for many parts, since Toro changes the design of many components during the life of a model.

Toro may be hard to deal with, but the snowblower is fine. This was the only problem in over five years.
 

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You probably could have tightened the old one up to get some more life out of it. When you had the cover off you should have noticed a cable going to a roller. There should be adjustments to the roller to change how tight it gets when you pull the handle. There might be an adjustment directly on the cable too. Your model number and serial number should be printed on a sticker on the back side under the handles.

When a belt starts to get loose it will start to slip and burn itself. The more it burns the more it slips and it is just a big circle. You should tighten it up periodically.
 
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