Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Seems like a weird question, but I need to transport this thrower 40+ miles twice on a snow day.

I don't have a truck or own a trailer (not like I'd want to trailer anything on a highway with deep enough snow to require a 26" thrower), but I do have a 500lb capacity hitch basket on an AWD vehicle with dedicated snow tires and 350lbs of tongue weight on a 2" hitch.

How heavy are these old throwers? I'm guessing close to 200 lbs, it's a whole lot of steel and cast iron, plus the tecumseh 8hp engine.

Is driving this thing around on my trailer basket a sensible thing to do? It would save me a ton of manual labor if I could.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
any scrap/"recycling" yards in your town? check in at the scale house and ask if they can weigh your vehicle w & w/o the machine in the basket - also, seems to me someone on this site will have the answer from a spec page on that machine
consideration w/driving it in the basket is be sure it's secure in the basket (amazing what "falls" out of people's vehicles.. snowblowers, gas grills, beds... all seen on the road) and what if any damage is going to done to the machine while it's riding back there

good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
If you have a bathroom scale, set the bucket on the scale and lift on the handles so the machine is vertical and read the scale. Perhaps a protective cover to prevent damage to the scale. Best to drain carb and fuel tank first. Oil should not be a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,905 Posts
My 24" Ariens Pro is about 270 lbs, from the manual. Given the wider bucket, and the fact that it's probably older than mine, I'd guess more like 250 vs 200, and I wouldn't be surprised if it was more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Do yourself a big favor and get a pick-up truck to put it in for transporting it that far.
When you see all of the crap that will get on it from the road that will end up on your snowblower, you will be shocked, like salt, snow slush, ice and any other dirt and crap.
You will have some damage and ice build up, and it will be ruined in a hurry. The electrical system can get flooded out, and controls flooded and frozen, plus any road salt will be all over it and cause rust.
If it would ever fall off of your basket and do damage to anyone else's property, your insurance might not cover it unless you have "Cargo Insurance" coverage.
Whatever kind of "Road Spray" that will end up on it may cause some damage and headaches for you with the amount of mileage travel you want to do with it. Otherwise you would want to seal it up inside a water tight container mounted on your basket to transport it that distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,275 Posts
Rent a closed trailer from U-Haul and buy some hold down straps from tractor supply.
This will be easier to deal with and the snow mule will be dry and the V belts will not be
all wet from the slop on the road.

At worst you can purchase a new 4 cycle toro single stage snow pup to haul back and forth
as it will be easy to transport. All you will need to do is drain the gas out of it before you load
it in the trunk before you leave and once more before you come back home.

It may be less costly to rent a closed trailer for a weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,905 Posts
I interpreted the question as being for a recurring situation. Moving it twice, on the occasions that it snows, to use the same machine for 2 properties. Not just doing this as a one-time thing.

If I misinterpreted, please let me know. But I think renting a trailer for each storm would get prohibitive.

I do certainly see a benefit to keeping the machine clean, dry, and free of salt spray!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Seems like a weird question, but I need to transport this thrower 40+ miles twice on a snow day.
Even cheaper than even a decent used 4WD pickup is to simply buy another snow blower, used or even new, and it'll give you a lot fewer headaches and maintenance work to do than doing that drive several times during the winter. Your profile says you live in Michigan to I'll take the liberty of assuming you get a fair bit of snow there.

I've never even been to Michigan, let alone in the snow, but even here in West Virginia driving 80+ miles round trip in the snow is not something I'd willingly do very often. Any chance you could just hire someone to do the snow clearing at the other location? That might be yet another option that is easier, cheaper, and a lot less stressful than driving to and from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Seems like a weird question, but I need to transport this thrower 40+ miles twice on a snow day.

I don't have a truck or own a trailer (not like I'd want to trailer anything on a highway with deep enough snow to require a 26" thrower), but I do have a 500lb capacity hitch basket on an AWD vehicle with dedicated snow tires and 350lbs of tongue weight on a 2" hitch.

How heavy are these old throwers? I'm guessing close to 200 lbs, it's a whole lot of steel and cast iron, plus the tecumseh 8hp engine.

Is driving this thing around on my trailer basket a sensible thing to do? It would save me a ton of manual labor if I could.

Thanks
The 350lb tongue weight will be multiplied the further you are away from the tongue, or receiver of it. The basket and weight will be located a few feet back from the receiver, which may equate to around 500 or more pounds at the receiver.
Also it will equate to over 500 lbs weight on the rear axle due to the leverage factor. Now think of the rear axle as a pivot point. You will have the added weight over the rear axle and tires, but you will have just the opposite over your front axle and wheels, meaning your front axle weight will be lighter because of the leverage/pivoting effect of the rear axle. Just like a "See-Saw".
You will have less weight and traction on your front/steering tires, meaning it will steer differently, and if you are on snowy roads, you will have less steering traction which can be dangerous if you loose your steering and front braking traction. The traction you may gain on the rear axle will be negated by the loss of traction on your front axle.
You would be better and safer to put the weight in the bed of a pick-up truck and place it towards the front of the bed for even weight distribution and traction on all wheels. Then cover the snowblower with a tarp and secure the cover so it doesn't come off and it will be protected somewhat from the elements while transporting it.
Pulling a trailer in the snow is not too much fun, especially if you are not experienced with that in the snow. You have the added weight of the trailer and the handling of it in the snow, trying to brake, start out, turn and back up with it, the loss of fuel mileage, when the trailer is much more heavier than the cargo weight of a snowblower, and if you can even get the trailer rented in such short notice due to a sudden snow storm.
In your case, I don't think it would be worth it to go and buy a trailer just for hauling your snowblower around. Who knows how many times you will need it, we can't always guarantee the weather predictions, and the cost of the trailer, registration and insurance, you wonder if it would be worth it if it may not be used. Plus pulling a trailer in the snow is a whole different world driving than just driving a vehicle without a trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,040 Posts
Not to beat a dead horse...but a nice 2 stage blower can be has for $300 or less.....just buy one and park it at the other place. I have one at my Mother's, and Girlfriends.....BTW I got a truck , trailer and ramps..but why go through all of that when you know you will have to transport multiple time????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Not to beat a dead horse...but a nice 2 stage blower can be has for $300 or less.....just buy one and park it at the other place. I have one at my Mother's, and Girlfriends.....BTW I got a truck , trailer and ramps..but why go through all of that when you know you will have to transport multiple time????
Basically he'd be better off getting a second machine. He'd have to maintain both of them, but they would only be doing half the work as just one machine would be doing maintaining both places, plus the extra work of hauling the machine around. So that would be a lot less work and wear on the two machines, compared to using just one for both places.
I would say that would be a lot easier having two machines, one at each place, than hauling one around all the time in bad weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I'm going to suggest having 2 machines, because... Those baskets are not too tight in the hitch and will sway quite a bit when driving; with over 200 lbs there, any adjustment in drive lines will not feel too great when the basket essentially whips the 200 lbs...most likely you'll feel cery uncomfortable. If you're in heavy snow, you can easily loose your rear traction.

2. If you insist on transporting the machine, (I assume you are using an SUV here with that tiungue weight), you might consider loading it in the back. The weight will be closer to center on your rear, and the ride will be less precarious. Keep in mind you might have to leave your hatch up, which may be a bit cold, but the ride, traction, and steering will be better than hanging the weight off your hitch.

I loaded a Husqvarna 28" blower in a mid sized Mazda CX-5 (drove the sucker on some ramps into the car). There were tie down inside, and the machine stayed put for the 60 mile ride home.

If you still insist on using the basket, don't forget to cover with a tarp to keep it clean.

Best option in end, like others have notes is to keep a machine at each pkace.

Good Luck!

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,565 Posts
40+ miles seems like quite the drive on a snowday. if you have to take your blower with you each time i would maybe even suggest finding something a bit smaller. i was using a my little ariens 5/20 for snow removal just because it is light enough for me to load into the back of my suv by myself. i would maybe guess it weighs about 100lbs. pretty easy to load/unload. anything bigger would be more difficult unless your pretty strong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
40+ miles seems like quite the drive on a snowday. if you have to take your blower with you each time i would maybe even suggest finding something a bit smaller. i was using a my little ariens 5/20 for snow removal just because it is light enough for me to load into the back of my suv by myself. i would maybe guess it weighs about 100lbs. pretty easy to load/unload. anything bigger would be more difficult unless your pretty strong.



Depends on how much you like driving in the snow I've done more just cruising around and enjoying the "bad" roads with no destination in mind. Though I come fully equipped with studded winter tires on my pickup and chains in the cab and a tow strap or two and a shovel in the bed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,565 Posts
i have no problem driving in snow. i use to sometimes beat the plow trucks out onto the highway and would be hitting snowdrift on a 4 lane wide highway. now saying that i will not head somewhere on a snowday if i know there is going to be a ton of traffic. there has been some days where it has taken about 30 minutes to travel about 2-3km in one of the larger cities south of me and the only reason it took so long was because of the snow and bad drivers.
 

Attachments

1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top